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TalentCulture Corner Office With Regis Mulot, EVP Global HR, Staples

In this Corner Office article, Cyndy Trivella, Events Manager with TalentCulture, spoke with Regis Mulot, Executive VP Global Human Resources at Staples. They talked about the state of the workplace and how mentoring, innovation and multi-generations are impacting the progress of business. As with past interviews, this article will highlight the perspective and experience of someone who has made the move to the “corner office.”

Cyndy: I had a great conversation, recently, with Regis Mulot at Staples. Regis has an impressive HR background. Before joining Staples, he was the VP of HR, Community and Corporate Citizenship for Levi Strauss, based in Brussels, Belgium, supporting employees in 24 countries in Europe, the Middle East and Northern Africa. Earlier in his career, he held senior HR leadership roles at Broadnet Europe, GTECH EMEA, and Chronopost.

Cyndy: Regis, because of your global experience, I’m interested in knowing about your point of view on innovation. First, do you believe it keeps companies relevant and timely, and if so, why do many companies still fall into the trap of “we’ve always done it that way?”

Regis: As we all know, change and risk-taking are challenging for individuals and organizations. We often see companies such as start-ups that are known to be innovative, struggle to maintain this core value over the long-term because it’s difficult and does not come naturally. Successful companies have institutionalized innovation within their organizations, making it part of the culture and leadership mindset. They put processes in place that enable associates to “work on something new” during their workday and innovate so that the company will ultimately prosper.

Cyndy: True. Being innovative means allowing change and does require a particular focus and shared long-term vision that must be culturally accepted to be enduring. Staying on the topic of innovation, I know the modern-day workplace and how it’s shaping the future workforce is an area of interest for you. One of the more important conversations we’ve been hearing about is mentoring. Why is it so important for there to be multi-directional mentoring in today’s workplace?

Regis: Mentoring programs have always been a “win-win” solution when mentees and mentors learn from each other. With the increased pace of our current business environment, change is constant and it is very difficult to stay at the forefront of new customer behaviors. Multi-directional (or Omni-directional) mentoring is a great way to address this, as it facilitates knowledge sharing and reinforces the need to break the functional or hierarchical silos. Good ideas and best practices don’t always come from the experienced leader, in many cases innovation, including the technological knowhow, is best taught by more junior associates. If this type of mentoring is done effectively, both sides will benefit from the experience.

Cyndy: I know many people who would agree with what you’ve said. Everyone has something to learn from another person and age shouldn’t be a factor. In line with what you just said, do you believe there are generational differences in the workplace or is this a perception cooked up by the media and others?

Regis: I don’t buy into the idea that Millennials are fundamentally different from Generation X or even Baby-boomers. However, the younger generation has a learning aptitude that is different, as they leverage social media, work across multiple platforms simultaneously, and prefer an environment that is almost paperless. The more experienced members of the workforce seem to express a little more caution when experiencing change, as was highlighted by our recent move [at Staples] to an open, collaborative space and away from the more traditional private work areas. So, even though learning is different between generations, there is no fundamental difference between the two. We are all looking for human interaction, consistent feedback, and better work life balance in a world that is accessible 24/7.

Cyndy: You bring up a good point here about people capitalizing on different ways of learning and you mention social media. Tell us more about how this venue lends itself to increased learning for employees.

Regis: Learning is about accessing relevant information in an environment where associates can be challenged, get insights, test concepts and retain. Social media provides a perfect venue where people can easily find pertinent materials, benchmark competitors and reference best practices at various companies. Personally, I use Twitter and LinkedIn to educate myself, as inspirational teachers and leaders often utilize these forums to share their knowledge with the masses. The combination of social media coupled with the emergence and popularity of mobile devices has created an environment for associates to be in a continuous learning mode with access to content anytime or anywhere.

Cyndy: Yes, social really is a wonderful up-to-the-minute venue for knowledge gathering. And with the advent of smart phones, learning can be done on the fly and anywhere companies have remote workers, which increases connectivity and communications for team building… a good thing.

Regis: Yes, the workplace is no longer comprised of people working together in one building. Business is global, and with that companies need to rise to the challenges of managing, training and communicating with remote workers.

Cyndy: Regis, we’re out of time. Thank you for speaking with me and sharing your perspective with our audience.

Regis: Thank you; I enjoyed it.

 

photo credit: Business Work via photopin (license)

5 Truths: Insourced Leaders Promote From Within

Insourced focused leaders should be tuning into ways to recruit and retain talent from within for strong results and increased employee satisfaction.

When my parents started in the world of work, there was an unwritten rule: put in two to five years on the job with a set job description and title before making your next move. Impress people, work 50+ hours a week, learn everything, and become essential to the organization. It was a recipe for success pulled straight out of 50s movies, and it was the way to move up the corporate ladder.

With every promotion, the interval between new titles might have gotten a little longer, but the company offered security and a sense of belonging. People might have been restless, but they knew where they stood. Companies retained talent, for the most part, because talent wanted to stay. There was a gold watch at the end, remember.

The path of career people who came up in the 80s, 90s, and now has been much different. Our perception of ‘meaningful work’ is different. Companies have a different attitude, too – I seldom meet anyone who’s been at the same company for more than five years. Perhaps this is par for the course for technical recruiters, or maybe it’s a sign of something different: companies have pulled the corporate ladder out of reach.

For some of my clients, in fact, there’s a belief that hiring from the outside is preferable to promoting from within – the ‘fresh blood builds a stronger company’ idea. While that trend may be good for recruiters, it isn’t cheery news for workers looking for promotions. I hear from people every day looking for work. Some are unemployed, but more feel trapped in a meaningless job or fear their skills have timed out. Many feel there’s no place to grow in their organizations. At the same time, companies bemoan the lack of employee loyalty and engagement.

HR Technology exists to help leaders solve at least a portion of these talent management issues. Maybe it’s time to make internal (upward) mobility a priority again.

What can leaders do to create a culture of loyalty while making growth and innovation a priority?

Here are five ideas to make the next rung of the corporate ladder easier to reach:

  1. Reinstate employee referral bonuses. A staple of fast-growth startups, referral bonuses give employees an incentive to stay – and to bring their talented friends onboard. It might seem risky or profligate in a time of slow job growth, but your top talent wants to work with other talented people, and their networks may be better than yours.
  1. Create an internal talent scouting network. Many managers fear losing their best people. Recognize managers who push talented employees to the next step in the organization. You might not be able to promote them right now, but they are demonstrating their commitment to the company, so find a way to acknowledge and reward them. Why not a 10 or 20 percent finders’ fee for bosses who nurture great employees?
  1. Cultivate fast-start work groups. You know who your best managers are. Choose the best from each department or business unit – especially in traditionally rapid-turnover areas, e.g. sales – and give them a management task: identifying and fast-tracking talent. Make it an MBO goal.
  1. Invest as much in management training next year as you spent on job ads last year. Fortune 500 companies appear to be headed in this direction but smaller companies may not have the leeway to send star performers to Harvard or Wharton for executive training. So look to other sources for courseware and build your own programs. Start with Harvard – MIT edX online offerings and work up and in.
  1. Institute a management and executive book club. Not all business-themed books are a bore; talk to the manager who’s most effective, or consult with someone from your Board. Find out what they’re reading and distribute copies to your managers. Pop quiz in 15 minutes.

Research shows it takes two years for external hires to perform as well as internal candidates promoted on the job. Ensure your organization has a promote-from-within strategy – every company needs a farm team.

A version of this post was first published on forbes.com on July 24, 2012

Photo Credit: nina_sochon via Compfight cc

4 Ways To Define Trust In The New World Of Work

It’s no big revelation that trust is the gas the drives the car when it comes to relationships; without it, you may roll to a dismal halt. Families depend on it; marriages are built on it. Pretty much any kind of partnership requires it, and without, the foundation of nearly any relationship is seriously weakened. It’s no different at work. But defining trust in the workplace it is a little different.

The meaning of trust hasn’t shifted. But the nature of how trust functions has. How? Geographically, demographically, even culturally, how we view trust and what it means has evolved, as have the rituals we use to build it. The same kinds of activities that might have raised eyebrows and closed ranks in the past can have the opposite effect now.

1) Accept that innovation will happen.

There’s a great lesson to be learned from Uber (again): how a rogue group of employees bypassed the workflow channels to create a new product. Since there was no time to bring a new idea (hashed out during an after-hours “jam session) to life during regular business hours, they created and organized it during a two-day workathon over the weekend. Was it elitist? Nope. Part of the impromptu quick-start of the product was that it could not be without the input of everyone in a range of departments and across functions. It was an open-minded, “Hey, how can we do this?” approach. Is this sneaky? Not if it’s part of company culture.

2) Value individual autonomy.

Studies like Deloitte’s on culture and employee engagement found that 87 percent of organizations surveyed cite culture and engagement as one of their top challenges. And 12 percent of employees are more motivated by work passion than career ambition — a number that will surely rise. The new workplace has to include self-motivation as a driving force behind employee engagement — which means (no matter the geography, whether digital or physical) that employees are given the freedom to grow, learn, and push themselves. The give stems from a workplace that trusts its talent. Companies that don’t weave this into their own culture are risking a higher rate of attrition than those who do.

3) Admit that humans have emotions.

Trust is not just a marketing slogan or a word on money. Lack of trust can dredge up a storm of emotions in anyone, from a spouse to an employee. Yes, we should all try to take the high road, as my colleague and friend Tamara McCleary points out. But in the workplace, the onus is with management to be able to lead with emotional intelligence. If an employee has an issue and it’s bungled due to some expectation of acting professional, at least these two things will happen: 1) resentment and 2) opacity.

4) Understand that we need to be friends.

A recent survey showed that groups of friends were able to perform tasks and make decisions better than a group of strangers. In terms of teamwork, being friends does indeed keep the car moving. But if we’re increasingly isolated due to changing work environments, far more telecommuting, shorter expected stints with an employer, and a host of other factors, how can we forge productive, inspiring, team-building friendships? We might take a cue from companies who make employee interaction and activities an active part of workplace culture.

Which once again, leads me back to that exercise in cooperation, the Google CoBike — that on-campus, multi-seated bicycle, which by now is part of Silicon Valley lore. If you want people to feel valued, work together, and trust each other, then make sure your workplace values people above all else. Trust will work wonders where nothing else will: increase engagement, productivity, communication, and decrease attrition. Trust me on this one.

Image credit : Shutterstock

A version of this post was first published on Forbes on 12/12/15

This is Why Your Hiring Process is Stuck in the Past

The hiring process is in a constant state of change — at least, it should be. The skills-laden job posts and run-of-the-mill interview questions of yesterday might have once succeeded in landing great hires, but that’s just not the case in today’s competitive job market.

To win over today’s best talent, companies need to remain innovative and competitive in how they hire. Unfortunately, too many companies are relying on outdated screening tactics and hiring methods.

To help you determine if your hiring process is stuck in the past, here are four old-fashioned hiring strategies and how to bring them into the 21st century:

  1. Leaving hiring up to one person.

Most organizations have a designated person for recruiting and hiring, but this strategy belongs in the past. Hiring should be a collaborative effort between human resources, leadership, and the department that’s looking to fill a position. After all, two heads (or 20, for that matter) are better than one.   

How to update: Get more people involved in the hiring process, from sourcing to screening to interviewing. LinkedIn’s 2016 Global Recruiting Trends report revealed that 26 percent of the 3,894 talent acquisition decision makers surveyed consider employee referral programs to be a long-lasting trend. So, incentivize employees to refer people they deem a good fit for the job by rewarding referrals that lead to hires.

  1. Screening via phone interviews.

The phone screen has had it’s run, but it’s time to say goodbye. Thanks to modern screening methods, the phone screen has become a less efficient way to get to know job candidates before the in-person interview.

For starters, phone interviews don’t paint an accurate picture of a candidate, as they don’t support a visual connection. Not to mention, it can be time-consuming to sit on the phone with one candidate after another. But, most importantly, phone interviews are difficult to standardize, which presents a big issue when it comes time to compare candidates against each other.

How to update: In place of the traditional phone interview, use one-way video interviews to screen job candidates. The nature of one-way video interviews makes it easy to assess and compare candidates — and in much less time.

What’s more, candidates favor them, with nearly half (47 percent) of candidates surveyed by Software Advice preferring them to other screening formats, such as the phone interview (which only 36 percent prefer).  

  1. Keeping your search local.

There’s no denying the benefits of hiring locally, however sometimes the local talent pool just doesn’t cut it. Considering that 35 percent of employers reported difficulty filling jobs due to a lack of available talent, according to ManpowerGroup’s most recent talent shortage survey, hiring managers need to expand their recruitment reach beyond their own backyards.

How to update: Advancements in technology have made it easier than ever to tap into global talent pools. Social professional networks, for instance, have become the top source for quality hires (43 percent), according to the aforementioned LinkedIn report.

While social media has made it easier to source and connect with long-distance talent, video interview platforms have made it possible for those candidates to take part in the interview process — without having to spend a small fortune on travel expenses.

  1. Communicating through email.

Email will always serve as a powerful communication tool, but is it the best means of communication for reaching the newest generation of job seekers? Another report by Software Advice suggests that texting job candidates is on the rise, with 43 percent of job seekers (under 45 years old) considering recruiters who use text messaging “professional.”

How to update: While initial outreach and acceptance (or rejection) is better suited for email, notifying applicants of new job openings, confirming application receipt or interview times, and other such communications are ideal for text messages. Just be sure those texts are sent at an appropriate time and in a professional manner.  

When it comes to hiring, there’s only one thing that has remained the same throughout the years: find and secure the best person for the job. It’s how you do it that is continuously evolving and improving.

What do you think? What are some other outdated aspects of the hiring process? Share in the comments!

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5 Essentials of Strategic Renewal

Every organizational strategy needs regular updating regardless of how successful you’ve been. It’s simply not good enough to develop your strategy and put it on the shelf, expecting that it will work indefinitely.

Always be looking for and recording the factors that have changed since you crafted the last version of your plan. The business environmental involves dynamics that are relentless and unpredictable and it’s better to be prepared for them by proactively renewing your strategy every year.

Here are 5 basics of the renewal process:

1. Revisit Your Strategy. If you don’t have a strategic game plan for your organization, create one. Ensure that your growth objective, target customer groups and competitive claim are all still valid given your current circumstances. Markets and competitors change rapidly and it is vital that what you claim to be your uniqueness is still relevant and true.

2. FOCUS. FOCUS. FOCUS.
Concentrate on as few objectives and action plans as you can. Avoid the pitfall of many organizations that think this is a brainstorming exercise where the more objectives you can define the better off you will be.

The reality is that if you have too many things to do, you won’t achieve any one of them particularly well.

Define the minimum number of objectives that will allow you to achieve 80% of your strategy. Apply your scarce resource only to the issues that will yield renewal success so figure out a handful of things to do and get on with it. Attack the critical few not the possible many.

3. Modify Your Business Processes.
Renewal requires that you analyze your business processes and modify them to be compatible with your revised direction.

Don’t assume your existing processes will work; they were created to execute your old plan not the renewed version.

And if you decide that cost reductions are required, do the process change FIRST; cutting costs without changing the WAY you do business could impair how you serve your customers.

4. CUT The CRAP.
Strategy is just as much about NOT doing things as it is about choosing a new direction. Once you have determined your renewal path, eliminate the projects and activities that are no longer a priority but simply drain the organization of time and energy.

Most organizations have difficulty doing this; they relentlessly hang on to the comfortable activities of the past and wonder why they can’t make headway on their new course.

The fact is, you don’t have the bandwidth to continue with the past and adopt a new set of priorities for the future. Assign a CUT the CRAP Champion for your team and charge them with the task of cleansing your internal environment of things that are not consistent with your renewal plan.

5. Plan On The Run.
Don’t get fooled into believing that your renewal strategy will go as planned. It won’t. There are always unforeseen events that happen and execution elements that fall short of expectations and you will have to make adjustments to your plan “on the run”.

Avoid sticking to your original course when the evidence proves its a lost cause. Develop a handful of key performance metrics and examine your progress at least monthly (in times of turbulent change, weekly monitoring may be in order).

Learn from your ongoing results and adjust your plan accordingly. The plan on the run formula: plan – execute – learn – adjust – execute – learn – adjust…

Build constant strategic renewal into your culture.

BE DIFFERENT than the herd.

Make the renewal competency your competitive advantage.

Bright Shiny Objects And Their Effect on Innovation and Technology

Innovation and technology have become cornerstones of our society. Whether we are the innovators of the creation or the end-users, we thrive and demand more of what we want and keep pursuing it to an attained end result. So how do we understand the difference between valuable and enduring innovations versus what appears to be the next best thing, but really isn’t?

As humans, we gravitate toward the innovations that are believed to move humankind forward. However, as evidenced by history, we often believed in a new and shiny object that appeared to have potential, but fell woefully short on delivering the expected results.

Objects du jour are a fact of life. Introduction to new, and what we all must have, is a constant in our society, but how do we distinguish and evaluate what is really valuable and what’s a fad? For the consumer, what’s important is knowing that their time and money are being used wisely. Likewise, the innovators are interested in the profitability of their creation and appeal it holds for the consumer. The irony here is that the innovations which don’t fade into oblivion can be difficult to identify as having merit to many consumers.

Putting A Price On Value

Many people believe the old adage, “you get what you pay for.” In some instances this is true, but it’s not a blanket statement we should use to explain the differences between reality and perception. Reality is when technology is tried and true by a number of people and there is a consistency to the outcome. Perception is like folklore. We want to believe it. We try to believe it, but regardless of what we want, the fact-of-the-matter is, we can’t wish something into being what it is not. In the face of perception, myth and reality become one. This juncture is where logical cognition withdraws, and belief in what we so desperately want, takes control.

In a society driven to deliver the “next best thing since sliced bread,” endurance, testing, user feedback and real-life use can be overlooked. The laws of supply and demand can supersede what is a realistic invention and what is simply the perception of what people believe they want and need. Even companies that are known as being innovators of desirable technology can slip up from time-to-time and launch a consumer lemon.

The Cost Of Perception

In the early 1990’s, Apple created a device called Newton. Newton was introduced to the public as the answer for having a mobile, personal desk assistant (PDA.) Newton was not inexpensive. At its launch in 1993, Newton cost $800 for a device and was so well-received at the time of its introduction at a MacWorld convention, it reportedly sold out within minutes. Expectations were high. End-users were eager to believe Newton would be an answer to their needs. Within the span of the next 12 months, consumers found that Newton was not what it was perceived to be. Users reported that Newton was functionally a disaster along with sporting a host of other technological failures, such as lacking sufficient handwriting recognition and poor systems memory. Newton was a flash in the pan. Albeit, some hardware and software developers, today, believe Newton paved the way for future mobile technology by introducing the modern-day smart phone.

For all the faults and failures of Newton, it did trigger interest in future opportunities, suspected possibilities and potential uses. It wasn’t a useful device in its time, but through present-day ingenuity and creative thinking, Newton may have laid the foundation to innovative thinking about the technology that spawned its functionality.

Lessons Learned

The saying, “What goes around, comes around,” is commonly heard. Look around your office, home, and car. Consider each item in those spaces. Chances are you’ll see the off-spring to a lesser known, now defunct predecessor that outlived its usefulness. This is the cycle of innovation… taking what once was and giving it a more useful modern-day purpose. When considering the cycle of innovation and the effect it has on business, there are two paths to choose.

The brands with a long history of innovation understand the options when selecting a path. These organizations keep striving to create the next generation of their brain child and learn better ways to appeal to consumer demand. One big take-away is that these enduring companies listen to their customers. They take end-user feedback and investigate ways in which they can retool their creation to keep it relevant and useful. A common marketing tactic, some organizations employ, is simply making what’s old seem new again. They do this by repackaging their goods to appease the current-day consumer. This action addresses the power and significance of public perception in the innovation cycle.

Brands that attempt to pursue business, without regard for current demands and user feedback, have a long, hard road to travel. Often, these companies are phased out for a better, easier-to-use and more cost-effective product or service, as in the case of Apple’s Newton. The cycle of innovation still applies here as nature’s way of eliminating the irrelevant with more useful advancements.

So where does your brand fall in the consumer spectrum of value innovation? The answer to this question is something every company and organization should continually assess. To not critique your brand value is otherwise inviting obsolescence and impending failure into your business model.

HR: You CAN Get There From Here

R.E.M sang the words and they are sometimes, jokingly, attributed to people from Maine – “you can’t get there from here.”

For those in HR, it’s not an uncommon thought – there are so many changes to workflows that seem straightforward and so logical to implement, but getting buy-in sometimes seems impossible or not worth the fight. Or just as frustrating, you may not know where to begin to make changes to help improve HR’s contribution to the business.

The good news is that it doesn’t have to be this way. Furthermore, you can be the instrument of organizational change that improves the bottom line for your company.

What’s the key?

Take it slowly – one step at a time – and follow the data.

Small Steps, Big Improvements

You just might be amazed at the improvements you can realize with seemingly minor adjustments. The key is implementing change incrementally, in small chunks that can be readily embraced by the people you’re serving.

Here’s a 4-step process for implementing real, beneficial change that improves the value HR contributes to your business. Note also that it is an ongoing, iterative process that never really ends.

  1. Target One Area For Change

You might have a long list of processes that are ripe for change, either due to a company directive or an area where you feel you can make an influential change. This might be reducing the time to hire for open positions, improving employee engagement or improving succession planning. It could even be as simple as automating some procedures. These are high-level goals that might seem unattainable or unrealistic to accomplish without a major company initiative and major resource investment.

  1. Review the data

Data presents a window to the opportunities before you. By looking at data such as current time to hire, level of engagement, skill gaps, characteristics of high performers, employees at risk of leaving and more, you’ll be able to isolate bottlenecks as well as opportunities for improvement. This will allow you to modify your processes and workflows where necessary. Simple changes can often yield enormous benefits.

For example, the data might show one simple operation (or single person or team) might be the only element preventing a significant improvement in your company’s time to hire. Maybe the approval process is bogged down at a particular place in the workflow. Change that one piece of your operation and the results can be monumental.

Or, data might highlight a particular team’s lack of engagement. With this knowledge, you can readily spot the root cause, whether it’s the manager, the employees or something else. Whatever the case, the organization will be better for spotting this information sooner than later.

  1. Re-Engineer HR Processes

With automation and data analysis embedded into your processes, you’ll now be in a position to make better decisions and improve the workflow of your talent acquisition and performance management operations. You’ll be able to handle exceptions faster and quickly adapt to external forces such as regulatory compliance changes. You’ll have insight to make better organizational decisions, such as who is best suited to fill new leadership positions.

Next, you can continue to review the data, confirm improvements have been made and continue to refine. Or, you may need to look at other potential areas of improvement. Then, keep going, continuing to improve processes and workflow. By continuing to look at the data to rationalize current procedures or change your workflows in an agile manner, you’ll be in a cycle of continuous improvement as you enhance your ability to contribute to your organization’s goals.

4. Transform Your Organization

Having achieved significant wins and real change for your company, the final phase of this data-driven journey is true organizational transformation. The data might reveal what actions to take in order to ensure certain top employees stay with your company. It can shed light on which managers and teams are doing the best job – and why. It will show you which people in your organization are most (and least) engaged.

With this data in hand, you can begin to make changes within your workforce to address the underlying causes of problems while better capitalizing on efficiencies and successes. This is an ongoing, never-ending process.

Bypass Obstacles One Improvement At A time

There are typically many roadblocks, real or imagined, when implementing change within HR or related functions. Taking small, achievable steps rather than attempting seismic transformation can lead to quick, huge benefits that have the added fortune of high organizational buy-in, due to the low-impact nature of the changes. The insight gleaned from data can lead to incremental changes in how you conduct business, which can result in faster time to hire, better hires, improved retention rates, improved engagement and much more.

Small steps, big results – you can get there from here.

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Planning For Tomorrow: Generation Z

While a lot of companies are still struggling with millennials, a smart HR manager is already looking at the generation Z, oldest of whom are turning 18 and slowly entering the workforce.

Generation Z will be, by all estimates, even trickier than millennials for whom  money is not as important as potential for growth and self-improvement. First studies with the newest generation, conducted by Adecco, show that although potential for growth is important to them as well, it is not such high a priority (41% for Millennials vs 30% for Generation Z).

Although they have been criticized for having a 8 second attention span, research by Altitude suggest that “Gen Z have a carefully tuned radar for being sold to and a limited amount of time and energy to spend assessing whether something’s worth their time“ and “One-way messaging alone will likely get drowned out in the noise.“

Evolving Your Business

This is something that HR specialists, managers and team leaders must adapt to. If employee engagement and two-way communications are important when dealing with Millennials, then in 5 years time it will be a vital part to attract and keep talent from the newest generation. Luckily, there are a lot of options.

It will require a very fine tuning of a company’s environment (culture and communications) to attract young people while unemployment is going down. The same studies mentioned previously show that for young people getting a dream job is more important than ever.

An attractive work environment is a place where an employee wants to work. For Millennials, it requires a positive relationship with a supervisor, clear two-way communications and a chance to improve yourself. I’m sure it’s the same for generation Z but they want more of everything. And they want it to be online. Communication must be fast, mobile and available on your iPhone. Work should be engaging (think of social online games),There must be enough independents that they can prove themselves and earn immediate recognition.

There are already a lot of tools for this sort of interaction (most of them start-ups created by Millennials). Some of them (like Office 365) offer complete solutions as an EPN but this is actually not what most companies need. It’s better to find one or two apps that cater to a specific need. For instance, if you need a project management tool, you can try Basecamp, or if you need a feedback/reporting tool, Weekdone progress reporting app allows for quick PPP or OKR based solution, that give an overview of everyone’s work without spending those 8 seconds.

Online communication tools add a feeling of social media to working, which is very important to both Generation Z and Millennials. Whether it’s game-like achievements or collecting points, it’s familiar for the young. Don’t forget: this generation has never lived in a world without a smartphone or iPad. For them, 24h Internet access is a normal thing. And they prefer communicating “in spurts of shorter, but more frequent, bursts of information” aka texting.

They expect not to lose all this when going to the office.

Staying ahead
The rewards from attracting Generation Z early are many. First of all, you’ll be ahead of others that gives you a chance to win over the best possible talents. Secondly, the Millennials (who’ll soon make up most of the workforce) want the same things so you’ll have made your company a perfect work environment for most of the workforce out there.

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Why Benchmarking Sucks

Benchmarking has its roots in the Total Quality Management philosophy. It’s a technique aimed at taking advantage of what other organizations have learned and successfully implemented and improve their own performance.

The Benchmarking Process Is Simple: Determine Who Is Best In Class At Something And Copy Them

Benchmarking is usually aimed at a business process or operations. Go-to-market processes for products, order fulfillment and human resource practices are among the many organizational functions that get benchmarked.

Disguise it any way you want, but benchmarking is nothing more than following who is believed to be the leader of the herd. And if you’re behind, the view never changes.

Benchmarking is a “tool of sameness”; it adds nothing to the success and survival capabilities that organizations must develop in today’s world of fickle customers, volatile economies and fierce competition.

Copying sucks the life out of businesses; it is non-strategic and yet consumes a disproportionate amount of resource in most organizations given the value it creates. In fact I have seen the copying process given such high priority it stultifies creativity and innovation.

It lowers the bar and reduces everyone in the herd to the lowest common denominator. If herd members are all replicating and offering essentially the same product or service, for example, any uniqueness a particular member had soon fades and commonality with the herd takes over.

Copying Perpetuates Invisibility For Herd Members

The copiers remain unremarkable and continue to blend in with everyone else. Copying doesn’t make you stand-out, it makes you fit-in.

The real challenge in business today is to be able to clearly answer the question “Why should I do business with you and not the many others who are competing for my attention?”

Benchmarking shows you are a follower (by the way, even a FAST follower is still a copycat) and gives people ZERO reason why they should buy from you as opposed to someone else.

We need to get our thinking straight. Uniqueness comes from looking to be different, not copying what others do, even if they do it well.

It is time to change the best in class frame from “How can we be the same as the best?” to “How can we be different from the best?” In the best of circumstances, organizations have difficulty dealing with answering this question and if a copy mentality clouds everyone’s thinking the task becomes virtually impossible.

And let’s all agree that the question ” How are we different?” should be the filter for determining what strategies are pursued and what strategies are deemed successful.

A new lexicon in organizations is required to drive strategic thinking. Words and phrases like “contrary”, “off-the-wall”, “weird”, “kinky”, “crazy”, and “are you kidding me?” should guide us in determining our future direction and what we want to be when we grow up.

Put benchmarking where it belongs: a tool that might improve your operational performance from where it is today, but will NEVER make you special and remarkable in a market dominated by hungry competitors.

Image: bigstock

#TChat Recap: Business Strategies That Help CHROs Sleep At Night

 

This week we were joined by Mark Stelzner, Founder of IA HR, a consulting firm that helps HR leaders transform their organizations with confidence. This week we talked about business strategies that help CHRO’s sleep at night.

HR is at a point of change and has been struggling to keep up over the past years. There is a complexity of the work environment regardless of the size of the organization and people are focusing on everything from empowering the EDP to change management.

Many organizations out there are really focusing on the problems, not the solutions available. So how should we approach strategic change management?

Did You Miss The Podcast Show? Listen On BlogTalkRadioiTunes or Stitcher.

What’s Up Next? #TChat Returns Wednesday, June 10th: #TChat Radio Kicks Off at 1pm ET / 10am PT — Our weekly radio show runs 30 minutes. Usually, our social community joins us on Twitter as well.

Next week’s topic: The Art of Candidate Engagement — Our halfway point begins with our highly engaging Twitter discussion. We take a social inside look at our weekly topic. Everyone is welcome to share their social insights #TChat.

Join Our Social Community & Stay Up-to-Date! The TalentCulture conversation continues daily on See what’s happening right now on the #TChat Twitter stream in our LinkedIn group, and on our Google+ community. Engage with us anytime on our social networks or stay current with trending World of Work topics through our weekly email newsletter. Signing up is just a click away!

Passive-Recruiting

Photo credit: BigStockPhoto

#TChat Recap: The Predictive Power Of HR Analytics

We could easily be intimidated by data. Yet, we crave answers on how to make the best hires, reduce cost, drive strategy… the list goes on and on.

Many organizations now turn to predictive analytics: the ability to take what happened in the past and find common relationships and factors (leveraging human behavior and neural networks) to model and predict the future, enabling us to report back in analytics with recommendations for the future.

Finance, Sales, and Marketing departments have already realized the importance of predictive analytics. Now it’s HR’s turn to gaze into the crystal ball.

This week’s #TChat guests: Chad W. Harness, VP of Lead Human Capital Analytics Consultant at Fifth Third Bank; and Jen Phillips Kirkwood, ADP Analytics and Innovation Ambassador, shared their insights on the predictive power that HR can bring (we’re proud sponsors of the Predictive Analytics World for Workforce.)

First step? Get clear on objectives and take a close look at problems that are in need to be solved. Once we have painted a clear picture, ask yourself: How can HR help to support KPIs and find analytics that can yield real action?

If we don’t trust or understand the data, it’s easy to make knee-jerk hiring decisions.

By understanding key differences between data, metrics and analytics we can make better recommendations and decisions for the future.

So how do HR leaders start a predictive analytics initiative successfully?

There’s no doubt that predictive analytics will have an immense role to play as we move forward. HR leaders want to get there, and frankly, they have to get there. Once we have arrived, HR will be given a stronger voice that will drive strategy and help cost reduction and retention.

Just remember, it’s not only about the data, it sometimes comes back to a curiosity and willingness to change.

See What The #TChat Community Said About The Predictive Power of HR Analytics:

What’s Up Next? #TChat Returns Wednesday, April 8th!

#TChat Radio Kicks Off at 7pm ET / 4pm PT — Our weekly radio show runs 30 minutes. Usually, our social community joins us on Twitter as well. Next week’s topic: Adopting Social Software for Workforce Collaboration and Communication

#TChat Twitter Kicks Off at 7:30pm ET / 4:30pm PT — Our halfway point begins with our highly engaging Twitter discussion. We take a social inside look at our weekly topic. Everyone is welcome to share their social insights #TChat.

Join Our Social Community & Stay Up-to-Date!

The TalentCulture conversation continues daily on Twitter, in our LinkedIn group, and on our Google+ community. Engage with us anytime on our social networks or stay current with trending World of Work topics through our weekly email newsletter. Signing up is just a click away!

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Innovate Today To Build A Vision For The Future

In addition to leading an organization, I’m a consumer and stakeholder in other brands. Like many people, I recognize what companies appeal to the broader masses and which have a dismal reputation for poorly manufactured products or are laden with bad publicity due to a barrage of public outcry.  So as a consumer, I will size up an organization not only for what they do with and for their consumers, but also how a company innovates today looking towards the future. A philosophy I have adopted within my own organization.

Innovation, along with customer service delivery, is dynamic and differentiates your business from another. Differentiation isn’t just knowing the competition in your space, it’s bigger than that. It’s knowing your business model and your customers’ business inside and out, and further how you outwardly value those who matter most. Many companies don’t understand their value proposition. This means they cannot deliver on their promises, whether that’s to their customers, employees, or even their business partners.

Companies like Starbucks, Amazon and Zappos are good examples of companies that understand differentiation and innovation. Information flows in and out of these organizations in a truth-well-told manner and they’ve become recognized for this. Ultimately it’s put them into a different class of company. One factor that is recurrent in these three organizations is that the CEOs have set a vision and outwardly live this vision every day. They’ve not passed the buck, they’ve retained control and took responsibility for steering the ship.

Good companies conduct sound business outside of silos with a few exceptions such as Pharmaceuticals which is government sanctioned and overly laden with patents. Doing good business doesn’t mean giving away the farm or disclosing all your secrets to the World, but it does show the World that information flows to and from your organization and gives the impression that you and your company are approachable to do business. Approachability shows transparency and vision, both can be used to set your business apart from the competition.

There are a ton of articles that discuss vision and innovation and the direct affect they have on the solvency and on-going existence of organizations. There is no one look or feel of innovation. It comes in many shapes and forms and works well when used wisely and liberally. Stagnation and lack of innovation will likely lead to the demise of organizations that refuse to heed the warnings.

So what are you doing to differentiate your organization in a market that’s over-saturated with an abundance of product offerings and services? This is a question that every smart CEO and business owner needs to be asking themselves. A good place to start is knowing your mission and vision. This goes beyond your brand, it is knowing your business plan and vision are on course and your short and long-term goals are attainable and being met. And, critically, understanding that plans must flex and evolve when needed. It, also, means your employees are provided a transparent view of the business mission and objectives and are supporting that vision because they’ve been provided the right tools to do their job and have the information they need.

Business is like a chain. One fractured link will impact the links around it and eventually the entire chain breaks. When you take care of all the links and recognize the intrinsic value each holds, it’s easier to see the bigger picture and that includes what the future can potentially look like for your company.  Locking in the company vision today will help create the business you want in the future.

 

#TChat Recap: Email Productivity A #NewWayToWork

“Email is the oil that runs the enterprise” – Carolyn Pampino

This week’s guest Carolyn Pampino, Design Director for IBM Social Business, focuses on designing better ways for business people to receive, act on, and share information – something that is vital in today’s virtual, social and hyper-connected society.

Let’s be honest, email can be overwhelming and painful at times. When Carolyn’s team researched email end-users, they found that there were a number of people walking around feeling guilty that they would miss that one extremely important message, buried somewhere in their inbox.

Email is unpleasant simply because it’s a method of communication that was invented in 1971, and has not changed or evolved to deal with an increased flood of communication. Messages that are not created as equals are treated as such, categorized by name, date, and subject.

To add fuel to the fire, we can access the overload of messages at all times through any of our devices.

Yet, traditional email it’s one of our most indispensable methods of communication, used across generations. So what can we salvage?

The goal is to make the end-user more productive and increase happiness. Instead of creating a new mail client, the amount of email that we have to deal with needs to be reduced, showing us what to focus on. Basically, make it relevant or make it go away.

So, can technology ease the burden that technology itself has created for us?  Will email be able to act like our personal assistant, streamlining our life? If it transforms to be more collaborative and intuitive, maybe, but it’s unclear how good.

https://twitter.com/cpampino/status/575805860900962304

See What #TChat-ters Said About Email Productivity A #NewWayToWork

What’s Up Next? #TChat Returns Wednesday March 18th!

#TChat Radio Kicks Off at 7pm ET / 4pm PT — Our weekly radio show runs 30 minutes. Usually, our social community joins us on Twitter as well. The topic: How To Manage The #NewWayToWork.

#TChat Twitter Kicks Off at 7:30pm ET / 4:30pm PT — Our halfway point begins with our highly engaging Twitter discussion. We take a social inside look at our weekly topic. Everyone is welcome to share their social insights #TChat.

Join Our Social Community & Stay Up-to-Date!

The TalentCulture conversation continues daily on Twitter, in our LinkedIn group, and on our Google+ community. Engage with us anytime on our social networks or stay current with trending World of Work topics through our weekly email newsletter. Signing up is just a click away!

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6 Things Your Fitness App Can’t Do

If you’re like most Americans, you may be wondering if this is the year you’ll be better at getting healthy.

Or, you may be one of the millions of people facing another New Year frustrated by your attempts to get fit.

Did you renew your commitment to health and fitness last year – and even work hard to meet your new goals – only to find yourself in the same place as last January 1?

Jumping on the newest apps like Fitbit or Strava will help you track your activity and can make you more aware of the exercise that you do, but for many, going digital has not turned out to be the secret sauce to success.

Even apps that are smart enough to build in positive reinforcement and feedback might not entirely solve the problems that face us as we try to get fit.

Why do even well-intentioned attempts with help from the best available technologies fail?

Robert J. Szczerba has hit on an answer: “Fitness technologies work best for people who are already motivated and have a disciplined fitness routine. For most people, particularly those who have not yet discovered how to motivate themselves, fitness tech devices are the electronic equivalent of the millions of unused treadmills and elliptical trainers cluttering many American basements.”

When it comes to transforming your health, you cannot put the cart before the horse, now can you outsource certain aspects of health and fitness to an app or a fitness guru.

Well-known fitness blogger and consultant Vik Khanna warns, “Relying upon fitness tech without a plan and solid motivational foundation is like aspiring to build a secure retirement but worrying about which mutual fund to choose, even though you have neither a budget nor savings.”

Khanna offers a helpful list of 6 tasks to accomplish first before embracing technology.

  1. Prioritize your goals – Fitness apps cannot understand your psychology or the problems you confront on a day-to-day basis. Before committing to a new routine, set reasonable goals and plan around what is possible in your busy weeks and weekends. It is not a bad idea to consult with people who care about you and understand what you can handle.
  2. Develop a plan – Once you know what you want to accomplish and the barriers and difficulties facing you, formulate a plan. Figure out a schedule and write it out. An app can generate a schedule for you, but it cannot see which goals are attainable in the context of your life.
  3. Build determination – Wanting to change is often different than having the determination required to enact change. Learning to break your goals down into achievable parts and work on them until you build your capacity for major change can make a huge difference in if you succeed or fail.
  4. Recognize your own efforts – Experts in the science of change have said that celebrating your small and large victories can be really important to getting your brain on board for creating new and healthier habits.
  5. Practice positive self-talk – If you are the kind of person who always sees the glass as half-empty, start working on telling yourself your glass is half-full. It is very hard to achieve anything with a head full of doubt even if an app is telling you what a great job you are doing.
  6. Make course corrections – Often when we hit a roadblock we throw out the whole plan. When your app is telling you to do something that you find impossible – try something else and don’t give up.

Fitness apps and resolutions can help you achieve your fitness goals – but they are not where you should start. If you really want to make your resolutions count in 2015 start planning for success by following these 6 simple steps!

About the Author: Dr. Deborah Teplow is CEO and co-founder of the Institute for Wellness Education. She developed the competencies and training curriculum that became the basis for the U.S. Department of Labor’s approvals in 2012 of wellness coaching as a new U.S. occupation and a Registered Apprenticeship Program.

photo credit: G0361117 via photopin (license)

In Management, Stupidity Is An Advantage

We live in a world laced with smartism, i.e., a universal presumption that being smart is better than being stupid. But in the modern work world, at least in management, it is better to be stupid than smart.

Realizing that this goes against everything you have ever been taught, here are just a few of the ways that stupidity and ignorance are superior approaches to management tasks:

1) The Dumber You Look, The More Stuff People Tell You.

If people think you are smarter than they are, they won’t tell you anything, because they will assume that you already know everything. This may include such items as your car is being towed, the company is being bought by Google, or the building is on fire. People love to feel smart, and if you let them feel intellectually superior, they will repeatedly indulge in that delicious feeling by telling you everything they know. Information is power.

2) Ignorance Is Opportunity.

When we attach shame to ignorance, we block the primary path to personal growth. Every journey of discovery begins with calm acceptance of the statement “I don’t know.”

3) The Slowest Thinker Is Always In Charge.

When a project needs a lot of folks to sign off on it, the last holdout always gets the fanciest dinner out to persuade them to get on board. When a team climbs a mountain, the slowest person tied on the rope line determines the pace, and thus becomes the de facto boss. And when people apply for a plum job, the last application sent in always lands on the top of the pile.

4) The Less Thinking A Manager Does, The More Thinking The Managees Have To Do, And Vice Versa.

Nature always requires balance, and the more managing that goes on, the less working gets done. The next time you curse your boss for being so stupid and lazy and disorganized, and thus making you work so much harder, take a moment and ask, “Is he doing this on purpose?” Your smartist need to indulge in feeling intellectually superior to the people in charge may be leading you down the garden path to unpaid overtime.

This article has taken an admittedly somewhat tongue-in-cheek tone, but this was done for a reason.

Talent, leadership ability, creativity — these abilities are easy to find. What is hard to find is someone who is not afraid of “looking stupid” by openly engaging in them. Most of us live in a world where we are constantly shamed for being different and imperfect. True leaders and innovators are people who are willing to expose their vulnerability in spite of this. They are willing to be seen making mistakes. They are willing to risk being shamed for “being a failure.” When it comes to paying for “top talent,” this rare ability to disregard the stifling power of shame is what you are actually paying for.

By countering shaming words with humor and humility, you gain power over them, and they lose their power over you. With a little study and practice, you too can become a superior performer, simply by “getting in touch with your inner idiot.”

About the Author: Justin Locke is a former bass player turned management philosopher. He is the author of the heretical management book “Principles of Applied Stupidity (How to Get and Do More by Thinking and Knowing Less); visit his website at www.justinlocke.com.

photo credit: jonolist via photopin cc

10 Ways To Escape From The Crowd

One of the more serious problems in society today is spacial separation; we are way too close to one another.

We find ourselves almost in the living room of our neighbor. Students sit shoulder-to-shoulder in classrooms and lecture halls. Sidewalks are jammed with a stream of people heading in the same direction to the same destination.

People’s brains are cluttered with the same traditional academic teachings with little room for an original thought.

We live in a crowded world with plurality forcing us to conform. The crowd is a blend of commonality. People move in a blur with no individual identity.

Crowds are imprinting agents. The mass creates pressure for anyone to get on the “average train” and be influenced by those around them.

It’s a serious situation in an economy that begs for remarkability, creativity and uniqueness to survive and succeed.

We MUST find ways for people to create space between each other both physically and mentally.

Physical separation exposes people to different environments with different agents of influence. Mental separation opens the mind to new thoughts with the capability of achieving remarkable things.

Here are 10 ways we can give the separation movement some help:

1. Change the conversation. Stop talking about how we can copy and be like others and start asking the question, “How can we walk away from the crowd?” Space is created by differences not similarities.

2. Reward people who screw up constantly. These are individuals who are on the edge, far from the herd. They live in space and should be encouraged to stay there.

3. Loosen up on the conformity thing. Recognize individuals who don’t follow the rules. Encourage students to color outside the lines to create something new. The education system requires a major overhaul.

4. Honor weirdness. Creativity is NOT a linear concept; it is expressed by ideologies and points of views unlike most others.

5. Hold teachers accountable for creating “new-idea meisters” in addition to how well students learn traditional concepts. Let’s do the unthinkable: pay teachers on the number of unique and creative students that leave their classroom!

6. Add emphasis to “the debate.” Sure. spelling bees have some value but why not provide more focus on the forum for thoughtful argument and disagreement? You can’t be creative and think out of the box in a spelling bee!

7. Get rid of uniforms. They are the signature of a crowd having similar minds and purpose; exactly what is NOT needed.

8. Avoid labels. Labels put individuals into buckets with the expectation that they are like everyone else in that bucket. It’s a disservice to the individual. Millennials? I see individuals with some similar values but many more with amazing differences if only we would pay attention to them. Stop classifying people; it sucks space.

9. Stay off public transportation especially in rush hour. Too any people; too much crowd snuggling; chance they could rub off on you.

10. Dump the “learning from others” notion. I get that there are some benefits from it, but after a point it becomes habitual and represents a barrier to thinking for yourself and coming up with creative ideas that have escaped fellow herd members.

Even if space is not a renewable resource we must find ways to not squander it and have confinement rob us of our originality and personal DNA.

Creating space is critical to a winning soccer strategy; it’s also a vital element of any personal and organizational growth strategy.

About the Author: Roy Osing is a former executive vice president and CMO with over 33 years of leadership experience. He is a blogger, educator, coach, adviser and the author of the book series Be Different or Be Dead.

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8 Actions You Can Take To Survive A Shift

When do you know a shift is occurring that will significantly alter the competitive landscape and terms of play?

There are some people who lead a shift and determine its direction. Steve Jobs engineered a series of discontinuities that not only changed the world of communication and social engagement, they also vaulted his company to another level.

But for most of us “mere mortals,” a shift is experienced after is has begun and marketplace changes are being felt.

Most retailers waited to see how online buying was going to evolve before morphing their brick-and-mortar business into virtual stores with cyber-selling.

The traditional media world is another example where the players are gradually incorporating digital and mobility capabilities into serving their customers and marketing their services.

It is rare that one is able to “see the forest for the trees” when discontinuity strikes; it is virtually impossible to see ahead and predict how it will all play out.

What is certain, however, is that those that decide to stand on the sidelines and observe the action forego any opportunity to influence the shift and have any control over the outcome.

Willing and active participants stand a chance of surviving; you either lean into a shift or be subsumed by it.

8 Actions You Can Take To Be a Shift Survivor

1. Be a learning organization, always listening for changes taking place in customer behavior. Study adoption rates of new technologies and customer solutions. Pay special attention to Millennials and women; they both wield the power to make you or break you.

2. Create a risk-taking culture. Shift survival = (doing) (lots of) (imperfect) (stuff) (fast). If you are not experimenting in the shift, you won’t survive it. Judge your survival competency on the number of failures you create.

3. Disrupt your current direction. Aggressively intervene on yourself and push for order of magnitude change. Modest change won’t satisfy the shift; monumental change might.

4. Apply “extension thinking” to overlay a trend in other industries on your business. Digital shift creates new value for people by connecting and controlling smart devices through cloud-based software platforms. What opportunities does this capability make possible for you? Study the trees and consider the broader implications.

5. Get your plan “just about right.” Reduce precision in the plan; increase precision in execution. Don’t try to create a perfect plan. It doesn’t exist, and while you are trying to discover it, you are not doing anything. Take an imperfect plan, execute it flawlessly, learn from the results you achieve and adjust it along the way.

6. Cut the crap that gets in the way of engaging in the shift. The projects and activities that may have been important in the old world may be grunge in the new, shifted version. How much stuff in the traditional print media business is crap in the digital world? How many resources are deployed in print vs digital? Preserving print robs you of the ability to engage the shift. Honor but expunge the old; you don’t have sufficient bandwidth to take on the new if you don’t.

7. Create VALUE that is relevant and unique for the customers you serve. Stop flogging products; start delivering experiences. Address the key wants and desires of the customers you choose to serve. Be the ONLY one that does what you do in order to stand out from the herd.

8. FOCUS. FOCUS. FOCUS. Do the few things critical to your shifted direction; avoid the possible many. Failure (and survival) is directly related to the amount of unproductive activity you have going on. Pick three (or four) projects and do them brilliantly.

Surviving shift requires different thinking and different action. if you presume that what got you here will get you to where you need to go, you’re fooling yourself.

About the Author: Roy Osing is a former executive vice president and CMO with over 33 years of leadership experience. He is a blogger, educator, coach, adviser and the author of the book series Be Different or Be Dead.

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Ignore Youth, Destroy The Economy?

I hate to sound all Michael Jackson, but children, they’re the future, man.

Yes, they are. The sad thing is that despite the roaring job market, we’re still not employing them at a rate that would be healthy to our economy. In the UK, 737,000 young people between the ages of 16 and 24 are classified as unemployed. That’s 16.2% — and in Europe the problem gets worse. In Spain, the figure has touched 57%.

The employment market is not dissimilar from the housing market. If you don’t let people onto the bottom rung of the ladder, houses at the top become harder to shift. The market stagnates, and progress suffers. In the jobs market, there are a host of consequences, which I’ll look at in this piece — but first, as if you need convincing, the advantages of youth.

Why You Should Hire More Young People

If you’re like me, you’ve more or less accepted that you’re not “young” anymore. It’s taken a while, but you’ve gotten there. You’ve acquired the battle scars of (approximately) 15-20 years in full employment, you’ve acquired your ways of working, and you’re part of the system.

Remember when you were younger and you had more ideas? More of a rebellious spirit in you? You need some of that.

Youth Is Innovation

It’s a hackneyed idea — perhaps a cliche. Yet, it’s a well-worn cliche for a good reason. As I progress into my 40s (next year, if you don’t mind), I find myself relying on younger people for that creative spark, for those ideas that will spark a campaign.

What I get is an alternative worldview. What I can do is take that, shape it, and put it into a framework that I know will work, and produce results for our clients.

The first step — if you’re anything like me — is to accept that you don’t know everything, and you never will. You can learn, and you can run to catch up, but when the ideas start to dry up, there are plenty of people who have good ideas.

Without innovation, you lose your competitive edge. In other words, if you don’t have someone to push your worldview out of shape and make you think differently, you’ll always think the same way, and that’s not good business. Someone else will be doing the thinking, and they’ll be somewhere else.

Youth Moves People Up

Just like in the housing market, movement is a good thing. Whereas people tend to move houses once every seven years, people move jobs at a much quicker rate — often within an organization, either being promoted or moved sideways.

Change is a constant, and people expect it. The last thing your people want is to stay in the same position for seven years, with the same salary and the same prospects. Without the feed of employees at the bottom of the ladder, longer-serving employees may feel that they have come to the end of their time with you.

If everyone wants to progress, it stands to reason that there is someone at the bottom of the ladder, learning the ropes. And this may be a little bit Karate Kid (wipe on, wipe off), but someone has to do the “churn.”

In order to bring about progress for your existing employees, you need to refresh at the bottom end of your organization; otherwise they’ll feel stuck, and eventually find that progression elsewhere.

But … Youth Brings Responsibility

It’s everyone’s responsibility to ensure that youth unemployment reduces — and that we get the best out of young people in the workplace. There is no way of nurturing talent unless we’re bringing people through, teaching them the ropes, and giving them the opportunities they desire. Those opportunities may not be framed in the way we know them; research clearly shows that Millennials desire more ethical outcomes at work, and actively seek roles that are morally sound.

Managing talent is multi-faceted, but over the last few years we appear to have forgotten the bottom end of the funnel, and we’ve stopped giving young people the chances they need. That needs to change, and there are incentives for you as an employer to turn that around.

The apprenticeships scheme, for instance, allows employers to take on a student, at a low cost, and train him or her up while they are studying. This has an extra edge over internships, where the intern can “come and go as her or she pleases” — because you are offering a fixed position.

If governments are encouraging us to get involved, we should. I, for one, will be looking at the apprenticeships scheme here in the UK, and I actively encourage others to do so too. We all have to do our bit — and I’m convinced that we’ll all do better as a result.

About the Author: Gareth Cartman is a marketer with a background in HR. As an employer, he is fascinated by talent development and management. As a Dad, it’s the same, but more stressful.

photo credit: Waag Society via photopin cc

#TChat Preview: Anniversary & Mending The Employee-Employer Relationship

The TalentCulture #TChat Show is back! After a week off for Thanksgiving, we’ll be live on Wednesday, December 3, 2014, from 7-8 pm ET (4-5 pm PT). The #TChat radio portion runs the first 30 minutes from 7-7:30 pm ET, followed by the #TChat Twitter chat from 7:30-8 pm ET.

In our last show we talked about the challenges of enabling a talent management strategy with technology, and this week we’re going to talk about the future of the employee-employer relationship — and celebrate the TalentCulture #TChat Show’s 4-year anniversary!

We keep talking incessantly about how bad the relationship is between employees and employers. Yes, we get it. It’s bad.

But even with the limited solutions that are offered today in the world of work, none has been actionable enough; we just keep playing misery shuffleboard.

Our guests for this week’s show argue that the key driver of organizational sustainability is the strength of the social contract that develops between an employer and its employees. And the fact that companies can and should recruit, manage, and retain entrepreneurial employees who will make them adaptive and innovative.

Oh, and we’ll also be celebrating the TalentCulture #TChat Show’s 4-year anniversary! If you’re tc-ipaper-blog2-700x325interested in taking a bit of a virtual trip down memory lane, check out our cool new anniversary iPaper.

As for next week’s show, join TalentCulture #TChat Show co-creators and hosts Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman as we learn about the future of the employee-employer relationship with our guests: Marla Gottschalk, Ph.D., Industrial & Organizational Psychologist and Director of Thought Leadership at Kilberry Leadership Advisors; and Chip Joyce, CEO and Co-founder of Allied Talent.

Special Offer:

Allied Talent is making the Executive Summary of The Alliance, which is not publicly available, to our audience. The Alliance, a highly regarded book on managing talent in the networked age by Reid Hoffman, Ben Casnocha and Chris Yeh, is about the loyalty pact between employer and employee. Download the Executive Summary here.

Related Reading:

Marla Gottschalk: Making Teams Work: Is There A Better Way?

Meghan M. Biro: You’re Hired And It’s Mutual: 5 Ways Employee Culture Is Great For Leaders

TINYhr: The 7 Key Trends Impacting Today’s Workplace

Brandon Hall Group: High-Performance Onboarding As A Driver Of Employee Engagement

Elizabeth Lupfer: Using Video To Increase Employee Engagement And Collaboration

Michael Bertrand: Employee Engagement Is About The People, Not The Tools

We hope you’ll join the #TChat conversation this week and share your questions, opinions and ideas with our guest and the TalentCulture Community.

#TChat Events: The #TChat Anniversary Show — Enabling The Employee-Employer Social Contract

TChatRadio_logo_020813#TChat Radio — Wed, December 3rd — 7 pm ET / 4 pm PT Tune in to the #TChat Radio show with our hosts, Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman, as they talk with our guests: Marla Gottschalk and Chip Joyce, CEO and Co-founder of Allied Talent.

Tune in LIVE online Wednesday, December 3rd!

#TChat Twitter Chat — Wed, December 3rd — 7:30 pm ET / 4:30 pm PT Immediately following the radio show, Meghan, Kevin, Marla and Chip will move to the #TChat Twitter stream, where we’ll continue the discussion with the entire TalentCulture community. Everyone with a Twitter account is invited to participate, as we gather for a dynamic live chat, focused on these related questions:

Q1: What are the pressing issues with the employee-employer relationship today? #TChat (Tweet this Question)

Q2: What should a social contract between employee and employer look like? #TChat (Tweet this Question)

Q3: Happy Anniversary, #TChat Community! What topics would you like us to cover in 2015? #TChat (Tweet this Question)

Throughout the week we’ll keep the discussion going on the #TChat Twitter feed, our TalentCulture World of Work Community LinkedIn group, and in our new TalentCulture G+ community. So feel free to drop by anytime and share your questions, ideas and opinions. See you there!!

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#TChat Preview: Anniversary Show And Employee-Employer Relationship

The TalentCulture #TChat Show will take a break for Thanksgiving, but will be back live on Wednesday, December 3, 2014, from 7-8 pm ET (4-5 pm PT). The #TChat radio portion runs the first 30 minutes from 7-7:30 pm ET, followed by the #TChat Twitter chat from 7:30-8 pm ET.

Last week we talked about the challenges of enabling a talent management strategy with technology, and in our next show we’re going to talk about the future of the employee-employer relationship — and celebrate the TalentCulture #TChat Show’s 4-year anniversary!

We keep talking incessantly about how bad the relationship is between employees and employers. Yes, we get it. It’s bad.

But even with the limited solutions that are offered today in the world of work, none has been actionable enough; we just keep playing misery shuffleboard.

Our guests for the upcoming show argue that the key driver of organizational sustainability is the strength of the social contract that develops between an employer and its employees. And the fact that companies can and should recruit, manage, and retain entrepreneurial employees who will make them adaptive and innovative.

Oh, and did we say it’s the TalentCulture #TChat Show’s 4-year anniversary? We did? Well, if you’re tc-ipaper-blog2-700x325interested in learning more and taking a bit of a trip down memory lane, check out our cool new anniversary iPaper.

As for our upcoming show, join TalentCulture #TChat Show co-creators and hosts Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman as we learn about the future of the employee-employer relationship with our guests: Marla Gottschalk, Ph.D., Industrial & Organizational Psychologist and Director of Thought Leadership at Kilberry Leadership Advisors; and Chip Joyce, CEO and Co-founder of Allied Talent.

Special Offer:

Allied Talent is making the Executive Summary of The Alliance, which is not publicly available, to our audience. The Alliance, a book by Reid Hoffman, Ben Casnocha and Chris Yeh, is about the loyalty pact between employer and employee. Download the Executive Summary here.

Related Reading:

Meghan M. Biro: How To Make Work Matter

Tracy Maylett: How To Leverage The Five Keys Of Employee Engagement

David Bator: Are Your Employee Engagement Efforts Getting Outdated?

Kevin Daum: 5 Simple Ways To Get Employees More Engaged

Russ Fradin: Here Is A Simple And Fun Way To Boost Employee Engagement

We hope you’ll join the #TChat conversation this week and share your questions, opinions and ideas with our guest and the TalentCulture Community.

#TChat Events: The #TChat Anniversary Show — Enabling The Employee-Employer Social Contract

TChatRadio_logo_020813#TChat Radio — Wed, December 3rd — 7 pm ET / 4 pm PT Tune in to the #TChat Radio show with our hosts, Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman, as they talk with our guests: Marla Gottschalk and Chip Joyce, CEO and Co-founder of Allied Talent.

Tune in LIVE online Wednesday, December 3rd!

#TChat Twitter Chat — Wed, December 3rd — 7:30 pm ET / 4:30 pm PT Immediately following the radio show, Meghan, Kevin, Marla and Chip will move to the #TChat Twitter stream, where we’ll continue the discussion with the entire TalentCulture community. Everyone with a Twitter account is invited to participate, as we gather for a dynamic live chat, focused on these related questions:

Q1: What are the pressing issues with the employee-employer relationship today? #TChat (Tweet this Question)

Q2: What should a social contract between employee and employer look like? #TChat (Tweet this Question)

Q3: Happy Anniversary, #TChat Community! What topics would you like us to cover in 2015? #TChat (Tweet this Question)

Until the show, we’ll keep the discussion going on the #TChat Twitter feed, our TalentCulture World of Work Community LinkedIn group, and in our new TalentCulture G+ community. So feel free to drop by anytime and share your questions, ideas and opinions. See you there!!

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How To Use Social Media To Build Your Personal Brand

If you’re still only using social media to chat with your friends and family, then it won’t be landing you a job anytime soon. Companies across the world are creating social media strategies to promote themselves, showcase their brands, and reach new customers. But you don’t have to be a business to make a name for yourself online — a single person can do it too.

Creating a Multi-Platform Brand

The biggest mistake people make when starting their social media brand is using the social media accounts that they created when they were 13. Of course, when your teenage self put your username as @CuteChickxx, you weren’t thinking about personal branding. You wouldn’t contact an employer with an unprofessional email address, so don’t do it with your social media accounts either.

Set up social media accounts under the same username. This could simply be your name or a combination of your name and career field — for example, @JoeGreen or @RecruiterJoe. You can use the NameChk tool to check if your desired username is available across hundreds of social media platforms.

Once your accounts are set up, create a multi-platform brand by using the same profile image and color scheme across all of your social media platforms. This will result in a recognizable, professional-looking “brand” that will make a memorable impact on those who visit your social media pages.

The Importance of a Distinctive Brand

Easier said than done. Everyone wants to be distinctive and memorable, but distinguishing yourself from other careerists isn’t always that straightforward.

When you start building your personal brand on social media, it’s likely that you will begin by modeling your social media profiles on the ones of prominent people in your field. This is a good first step, but then you need to consider what makes you different. Maybe you have a special interest in your field, a skill that is in demand, or even a unique hobby. Incorporate this into your brand too.

A professional photo will also go a long way to making your brand distinctive. By using the same head shot across your social media accounts and on any websites you contribute to, your face will become recognizable to followers and readers. Investing in a photo shoot can be a wise decision, though if you have a good camera then using a plain-colored wall and getting the lighting right can work like a charm too.

Sharing Meaningful Content

The internet is full of cute cats and funny memes, but even if you love them, don’t share them on your social media pages. Be specific about what you share. You want the people who see your profiles to be able to build a professional but personal portrait of you. Share articles from authority sites in your field and participate in debates on newsworthy topics. Your aim should be to post and share content that is meaningful, opinions that are insightful and thoughts that are valuable.

Rule number two: post a variety of visual content. We are visual creatures, and therefore our brains are better able to process images, infographics and videos than blocks of text. In fact, content which is broken up with images gains 94% more total views on average than content without. Adding a photo URL to your tweet can boost retweets by 35%, while photos gain an 87% interaction rate from fans on Facebook, making them the most engaging type of content.

Engaging and Networking on Social Media

You’ve designed a seamless multi-platform social media brand to showcase the best of yourself and you’re sharing thoughtful, insightful content and opinions. But you’re not going to get anywhere with 0 followers and a couple of Facebook likes from your mom. Build yourself a network of social media contacts.

Follow, like, connect and engage with talented people in your field, from the authority sites down to the grassroots bloggers. Reply to their social media updates and start conversations. If they like your personal brand and the content you’re posting, then they will start to share and retweet you. This way you are able to reach a larger audience and gain more social media followers. It takes commitment, but it’s very possible for you to establish yourself as someone worth listening to in your chosen field.

Landing a Dream Job with Your Personal Brand

Social media is an excellent way to meet people in high places. Engaging on social media has begun the process of strengthening your personal brand and networking has made you some valuable contacts. But how can you use that to land your dream job?

There are two things you need to do now. Firstly, engage with the companies that you are interested in across all social media platforms. This is exactly the same process as networking with individuals. Leave interesting and valuable comments in reply to updates posted by the organizations you are interested in working for. Start creating a list of employees who work there and engage with them too. If your personal brand is good, you will soon start to be recognized. This will give you a massive advantage when inquiring about and applying for jobs there.

Secondly, focus your time on growing your LinkedIn network. 78% of recruiters have hired through a social network, and the clear leader of the pack is LinkedIn, which is used by 92% of those recruiters. Add all of the contacts you’ve made on Facebook, Twitter and your other social media platforms on LinkedIn, and begin connecting with their connections too. The next step is to join groups — or even better start a group — relevant to the career path you’re following. Joining in with discussions is a surefire way to get you noticed by recruiters, headhunters and experts in your field.

Success with Your Personal Brand

Building a personal brand on social media doesn’t happen overnight. It’s a long-term commitment. To ensure success with your personal brand on social media, it is essential to have a good design, create and share valuable content, and build good relationships with other social media users. Persevere and you will find success.

About the Author: Ron Stewart has worked in the recruitment industry for 30 years, having owned companies in the IT, Construction and Medical sectors. He is currently running the Jobs4Group, and is CEO of Jobs4Medical. Ron is a regular contributor to TalentCulture, the Brazen Careerist and Jobs and Careers Magazine.

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Unleashing Innovation: Are You Up For A Challenge?

Innovation, innovation, innovation. When CEO’s were asked by IBM how they envisioned their companies to grow in 2014, they all pointed to innovation of their current products and services as the main driver for improved results. Most of these leaders added they were looking for ways to bring about these innovations from within, but that they were not yet sure how that could happen.

Not far from now, we’re 100 days away from 2014 to end – and so we’re curious: where’s your company at? Did you succeed in finding ways to fuel innovation from inside of your organization? How many breakthrough ideas were spotted and put into the funnel for execution?

From what we’ve heard, most companies are still struggling with unleashing the innovation powers of their employees. It’s not an easy process for sure, as it is far from a one-time event.

Positively Impact the Bottom Line

If you want high quality and high volume of ideas for innovation, to positively impact the bottom line, it requires a culture different from that often still alive in most organizations: a culture built on trust, transparency, recognition, ownership and collaboration.

As we’ve come to understand, successful innovation is not about ideas – there’s plenty of ideas available, and even when you’d argue not all are good ones (which is absolutely true) and you’d pick a very tiny percentage of all ideas being born daily in your organization, our bet would be that the amount of these ideas-with-potential, is still large enough for distilling even further towards finding some real winners.

Three Crucial Elements

The trick is to have those ideas being out there put into action, instead of laying dormant inside the heads of your employees. When asked about ideas and the willingness to implement them, the majority of young professionals and aspiring corporate innovators mention they feel they lack three crucial elements, which keeps them from taking action: time, resources and support.

And those who do commit to trying anyways, report to find themselves unprepared for doing whatever it takes to get it implemented. Especially in your first years in the corporate world, you don’t know how it all works – decision making, politics, stakeholder interests, timing and alignment with organizational objectives.

Since a company culture can only be transformed by doing things the new way instead of the old, one action at a time, you best start with one single step. A great way to creating a company culture supporting innovation from within, building on these five elements mentioned earlier, is to facilitate those employees with a potentially good idea in taking the leap and converting their ideas into reality.

Where to Start

Start with reaching out to those employees with that imaginary light bulb above their heads. Tell them you value their ideas, and that you want to offer them a chance for implementing them. Offer them a challenge: you can spend some portion of your time on your idea, you get the resources and support you need, and you get the opportunity to develop essential skills. And add some motivation to the challenge by putting a clear deadline for delivering results – why not pick that horizon of 100 days before the year ends?

Maybe their idea is not that good, and it will not survive the first round of feedback from key stakeholders. Maybe some of them will fail because they find out their idea was not in sync with the overarching goals of your company. Maybe some will just do a lousy job of communicating their ideas and presenting a proper business case.

But maybe… some will succeed. Some will find ways through traditional barriers. Some will show exceptional qualities for storytelling and pitching ideas. Some will be natural-born innovators, suddenly being able to do something they really believe in.

It’s Been Said…

You never know if you don’t try. Or better said, you never know if you don’t get them trying. And we can help you with that in such a way that chances of success are highest. Our 100 Days Intrapreneurs Challenge is designed to guide the newest cohort of employees towards implementing their best idea for innovation, within 100 days. We’ve got impactful video lectures, personal coaching and mastermind groups lined up to support them.

Can you remember the first time you managed to change something or convinced a senior manager about your great idea? Possibly, that was one of the defining moments for your career. Offering your eager beavers the opportunity to grow in the same way, will not only lead to some great ideas being implemented, you effectively build that new culture – one employee at a time. What are you waiting for?

Apply Now

(About the Author: What if people feel fulfilled and engaged at work, and organizations thrive by having a positive impact on the world? Hans Balmaekers is driven to transform that vision into reality. He is the founder of sa.am, offering corporate mavericks, change makers and impactful leaders a global network of like-minded people, and an environment for collaboration and learning – both online and offline.

The next edition of the sa.am 100 Days Intrapreneurs Challenge starts on September 8, with the goal of offering 100 aspiring intrapreneurs the guidance, support and tools they need to turn their ideas into actual results before the end of the year. More info here.)

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3 Ways Creative Engagement Hatches Employee Engagement

Creative engagement and employee engagement are the chicken and the egg. Or the egg and the chicken. Impossible to know which comes first because they so strongly reinforce each other. And that’s why it’s a good idea to strive for both!

Employees with the opportunity to express their creativity engage more fully in their work. Work places that encourage creativity enjoy engaged work forces. Recognition of creativity that contributes to specific successes stimulates further creativity, and so more employee engagement.

Creative Engagement: Freedom

When employees feel free to approach problems from creative perspectives, they take creative risks. When they allow themselves creative risks, they freely generate creative ideas. Given the freedom to apply their creative ideas, they do so. That freedom stimulates their creative energies. That is creative engagement. That leads beyond involvement in the work at hand. It generates employee engagement to job, to team and to company. Game playing and viewing one’s work as a game (a serious game, to be sure) are proven successful. Creative freedom boosts productivity. Check the interview with Jane McGonigal, author of Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World.

Creative Engagement: Habits

Some companies worry that employees spend too much time social networking. Some companies see any time as too much time. They fear it’s taking away from people performing their assigned work. Savvy companies, on the other hand, creatively direct employees’ engagement with Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and other social networks. They correctly see it as good for the company. Dell Computer allows — even authorizes — employees to “speak for Dell” on social networks. Dell offers full-day training on how to use Twitter and Facebook, without instructing employees to follow any corporate script on line. Social networking generates the opportunity for free thinking, new ideas, creative discovery. Allowing that to become a habit, a creative engagement, is “engagement plus.”

Creative Engagement: Recognized

Typically, the more one succeeds, the more one succeeds. Success breeds success. Creativity is proven to  contribute to success. Creative success that is publicly recognized and celebrated breeds more creativity and more success. A victorious — rather than vicious — circle. Applaud successful products, projects, endeavors and comebacks by giving special attention to their creative elements. Label them as creative. Hold them as examples to match in the future. Creative engagement — a specific and valuable form of employee engagement — will blossom.

Creativity motivates itself. That’s creative engagement. Generating a new idea, determining a novel procedure, designing a streamlined approach–all have appeal to the human mind and emotion. In other words, we naturally choose to engage in creative opportunities in our work. Work that offers creative opportunities is work we want to do. The workplace home to such work is where we want to be. That’s employee engagement.

Doesn’t matter which clucks or cracks first.

(About the Author: As an Employee Engagement and Performance Improvement expert, Tim Wright, has worked with businesses and national associations of all sizes. His company, Wright Results, offers proven strategies and techniques to help businesses increase employee engagement, improve personnel performance and build a strong business culture by focusing on performance management from the C.O.R.E. For more information, visit www.wrightresults.com or connect with Tim here: tim@wrightresults.com)

To discuss World of Work topics like this with the TalentCulture community, join our online #TChat Events each Wednesday, from 6:30-8pm ET. Everyone is welcome at events, or join our ongoing Twitter and G+ conversation anytime. Learn more…

TalentCulture World of Work was created for HR professionals, leadership executives, and the global workforce. Our community delves into subjects like HR technologyleadershipemployee engagement, and corporate culture everyday. To get more World of Work goodness, please sign up for our newsletter, listen to our #TChat Radio Channel or sign up for our RSS feed.

Do you have great content you want to share with us? Become a TalentCulture contributor!

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#TChat Recap: Authenticity Is An Inside Job That Starts With Self

Authenticity Is An Inside Job That Starts With Self

Everyday, there’s a flock of people who head to work and experience a daily dosage of empowerment, then there’s the other flock that experiences workplace dread on a daily-basis. Some people get to work in highly engaging workplaces, while others count the seconds till the clock strikes freedom. Within each workplace culture there exists what’s referred to as workplace authenticity, whether it’s real or fake. Few experience it first-hand, and many can only wonder about what it would be like to be true to themselves at work and ideally, in everyday life. This week, #TChat was joined by Jason Lauritsen and Joe Gerstandt.

Both of them get why authenticity is an invaluable workplace mindset that encourages innovation through openness, trust, and communication. Interestingly enough, authenticity is about being real and true to one’s self. Yet, in the workplace, Jason believes that:

Yes, even if that person becomes a bit of an annoyance. We must look within ourselves to find who we really are inside our workplace and who we want to be. To do so, we must:

Speaking the truth does require boldness and at times being unpopular in the process. It’s through these initial actions that we begin to discover the value in being authentic. We must find it within ourselves to accept authenticity. Instead of authenticity finding acceptance at the bottom of an organization:

Authenticity has to begin at the top and work its way down to the entire organization. It should be embraced with open arms. It must be greeted with optimism. Workplace productivity and business results experience a bumpy ride when employees are not allowed the freedom to be themselves at work. Simply put:

If authenticity generates better engagement and happier employees, then what employer wouldn’t care about the end results? If organizations truly care about the bottom line, then cultivating workplace authenticity can provide the fruition they seek. Don’t have employees sitting around waiting until the clock strikes freedom (and the end of their workday). Have them working at highly productive levels through the empowerment of workplace authenticity. Keep employees engaged by letting them voice their opinions and developing a cultural mindset of being real with themselves and other people that surround the culture. Any organization will see the results are at least worth taking another look at.

Want To See The #TChat Replay?

Closing Notes & What’s Ahead

Thanks again to our guests Jason Lauritsen and Joe GerstandtClick here to see the preview and related reading.

#TChat Events: Authenticity Is An Inside Job That Starts With Authenticity

TChatRadio_logo_020813

#TChat Radio — Are you plugged in to #TChat radio? Did you know you can listen live to ANY of our shows ANY time?

Now you know. Click the box to head on over to our channel or listen to Authenticity Is An Inside Job That Starts With Self.

Note To Bloggers: Did this week’s events prompt you to write about trends on culture?

We welcome your thoughts. Post a link on Twitter (include #TChat or @TalentCulture), or insert a comment below, and we may feature it!

If you recap #TChat make sure to let us know so we can find you!

We Want To See You On TalentCulture. Become A Contributor Now!

Sign up for the newsletter to get the scoop on next week’s guest, topic and questions!

Save The Date: Wednesday, June 25!

Next week’s #TChat Topic: The “Be Different or Be Dead” Show

The TalentCulture conversation continues daily on #TChat Twitter, in our LinkedIn group, and on our new Google+ community. So join us anytime on your favorite social channels!

 

#TChat Recap: The Power Of Workforce Culture And Continuous Mobility

The Power Of Workforce Culture And Continuous Mobility

Time and time again, employers and organizations find their talent on the move. And why is that? What drives employees to leave? Instead of finding ourselves asking this question, we should be asking, “What drives employees to stay?” Sometimes before you can go forward, you have to go backwards. Meaning, we have to retrace our steps and find ourselves at the early stages of onboarding to discover the secrets of retaining employees. This week, #TChat was joined by Tracey Arnish, Senior Vice President of Talent at SAP, who understands what managing and retaining talent is all about.

Getting new employees onboard early plays a vital role in the outcome of each employee in your organization. Tracey provides us with a glance of the short and long-term effects of new hire onboarding:

It’s through this glance that employers can visualize a roadmap to their employees’ engagement and development. From here, employers and new hires can build a career path together and:

Because at the end of the day, all employees are valuable assets, that provide your organization with the brain power and muscle to innovate and achieve success. But if you want your talent to stick around, then you have to develop it. You can do this if you:

Employees need to know that their career growth matters to you, as much as it matters to them. Why? Simply put, your employees’ engagement, productivity, and happiness is what’s at stake here. This all factors into the kind of short and long-term success your organization will have. And don’t forget, it shapes the kind of workplace culture you’ll have.

Want To See The #TChat Replay?

Closing Notes & What’s Ahead

Thanks again to our guest Tracey ArnishClick here to see the preview and related reading.

#TChat Events: The Power Of Workforce Culture And Continuous Mobility

TChatRadio_logo_020813

#TChat Radio — Are you plugged in to #TChat radio? Did you know you can listen live to ANY of our shows ANY time?

Now you know. Click the box to head on over to our channel or listen to The Power Of Workforce Culture And Continuous Mobility.

Note To Bloggers: Did this week’s events prompt you to write about trends on culture?

We welcome your thoughts. Post a link on Twitter (include #TChat or @TalentCulture), or insert a comment below, and we may feature it!

If you recap #TChat make sure to let us know so we can find you!

We Want To See You On TalentCulture. Become A Contributor Now!

Sign up for the newsletter to get the scoop on next week’s guest, topic and questions!

Save The Date: Wednesday, June 18!

Next week’s #TChat Topic: Authenticity Is An Inside Job That Starts With Self.

The TalentCulture conversation continues daily on #TChat Twitter, in our LinkedIn group, and on our new Google+ community. So join us anytime on your favorite social channels!

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