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252 Powerful Words to Avoid Apocalypse at Job Interview

In the beginning was the Word.

Have you ever wondered why some writers can’t hook us while others simply toy with your emotions? Why do we listen to some speakers carefully while others make us nothing but fall asleep?

Words.

They use different words to influence readers and listeners.

When written in resumes or said during job interviews, words become your powerful weapon. The better you use them, the bigger your chances to influence recruiters are.

So, how to do that?

Next time you write a resume, make sure you use strong and powerful words, as they increase your chances of getting hired by 80%! It’s high time to forget about clichés: professional recruiters read hundreds of resumes daily, so they are sick and tired of all those “great team player” or “responsible and dedicated individual” every second candidate writes in resumes and says at job interviews.

Powerful words in your resume will help you avoid apocalypse and motivate recruiters, especially when you search for your first job after graduation.

Said during an interview, they can do wonders.

Carefully-chosen, such words draw interviewers from one emotion to another, making them sympathize you and see you an ideal candidate as compared with others.

What are these powerful words, after all?

Broken down alphabetically, they are easier to find and remember.

A-Words

Able

Absorb

Accelerate

Accomplish

Achieve

Acquire

Administrate

Advanced

Advise

Advocate

Align

Amplify

Analyse

Announce

Appraise

Arbitrate

Assemble

Assess

Assign

Assist

Attain

Attract

Audit

Authorize

Award

B-Words

Balance

Bargain

Benefit

Block

Bolster

Boost

Brief

Budget

Build

C-Words

Calculate

Campaign

Capitalize

Centralize

Chart

Clarify

Coach

Co-author

Collaborate

Commit

Complete

Comply

Compose

Conduct

Conserve

Consolidate

Consult

Convert

Convey

Convince

Contribute

Coordinate

Correspond

Counsel

Create

Critique

Customize

Cultivate

D-Words

Decrease

Deduct

Define

Delegate

Deliver

Demonstrate

Design

Detect

Develop

Devise

Devote

Design

Dispatch

Diagnose

Discover

Distinguish

Diversify

Document

E-Words

Earn

Educate

Enable

Encourage

Enforce

Engineer

Enhance

Enrich

Ensure

Establish

Evaluate

Examine

Exceed

Excell

Expand

Explore

F-Words

Facilitate

Field

Finance

Forecast

Forge

Formalize

Formulate

Foster

Found

Fulfill

Further

G-H-Words

Gain

Gather

Generate

Head

Help

Hire

Host

Give

Grant

Guide

I-Words

Identify

Illustrate

Implement

Improve

Improvise

Incorporate

Increase

Influence

Inform

Initiate

Innovate

Inspect

Inspire

Integrate

Interpret

Introduce

Investigate

Itemize

L-M-Words

Launch

Lessen

Lift

Lobby

Maintain

Manage

Map

Market

Monitor

Motivate

Multiply

Maximize

Measure

Mediate

Mentor

Merge

Mobilize

Modernize

Modify

N-O-Words

Navigate

Negotiate

Observe

Obtain

Oversee

Outpace

Outperform

Operate

Organize

Originate

Overhaul

P-Words

Participate

Partner

Perform

Persuade

Pioneer

Plan

Prepare

Present

Project

Promote

Provide

Publish

Q-R-Words

Qualify

Rank

Reach

React

Receive

Recommend

Reconcile

Recover

Recruit

Redesign

Quantify

Reduce

Reengineer

Refine

Refocus

Regulate

Rehabilitate

Reinstate

Remodel

Reorganize

Quote

Replace

Represent

Restructure

Resolve

Retain

Revamp

Review

Revise

Revitalize

S-Words

Safeguard

Save

Scrutinize

Secure

Segment

Select

Shape

Showcase

Simplify

Skill

Spearhead

Specify

Standardize

Stimulate

Streamline

Strengthen

Structure

Succeed

Suggest

Supervise

Support

Surpass

Survey

Sustain

T-U-V-Words

Target

Teach

Test

Track

Train

Transcend

Transform

Translate

Triumph

Tutor

Uncover

Unify

Unite

Update

Upgrade

Utilize

Validate

Value

View

Verify

As far as you see, all power words are verbs of action. When you use them in resumes and interviews, you tell a recruiter that you are a doer, a man of action who is ready to work and do his best.

It’s clear you shouldn’t use all 250+ words at once or learn them ALL to blow HRs out of the water:

  • Check them carefully;
  • Choose those corresponding to your skills and describing you as a leader and responsible individual ready for self-development, learning, and working the best you can;
  • Make sure they sound during your answers to a recruiter’s question.

A word is a powerful weapon that can help you win as well as fail. So, use this weapon for your sake.

Have you ever thought of words as a method to influence interviewers? Do you consider it a good technique to improve your resume and help you get a dream job?

photo credit: Interactive e-Resume Template Vol. 1 via photopin (license)

Job Market Demands Creative Thinkers

The current job market demands creative thinkers. A recent study titled “Tomorrow’s Most Wanted” (conducted by Global Learning Institute Hyper Island and Edelman in Stockholm, Sweden) suggests that creativity, among other personality traits, is more important than technical skill sets.

Most applicants have a specific technical skill set related to the positions to which they are applying. However, the unsettling piece of this (at least for those currently looking for jobs) is that it can create a false sense of confidence in applicants. Did you ever submit an application to a job (that you were qualified for) with the utmost confidence that you will receive a phone call, only to be left hanging?

Think of it this way. Every job opening receives an average of 118 applications. The majority of these applicants have the technical skills necessary to complete the job requirements. How do recruiters narrow down the application pool if there are that many qualified individuals? Once the applicant pool is narrowed down to individuals who have the technical skill sets, employers look to your personality traits such as creativity.

Creativity can be learned.

Elizabeth Gilbert’s infamous TED Talk, “Your Elusive Creative Genius,” shares the idea that instead of someone “being” creative, we all “have” creativity within us. Humans are born with the ability to be creative. This does not mean you have to win the genetic lottery in hopes of being creative – instead, it can be learned and taught.

We’re not saying you need to invent the next iPhone.

People often mistake creativity with innovation. Innovations are often creative; however, creativity doesn’t necessarily need to be innovative. Creativity can be used to transform mundane, repetitive jobs into something enjoyable (for the employee) and efficient (for the company). A common example is creating scripts to automated repetitive jobs.

Promoting creativity during the application process

Many candidates have it all: technical skills, experience, and the perfect personality traits. However, their resume only shows the first two, which brings us back to square one. How do you show employers that you have the creativity they are chasing? Answer: use a creative resume. Creative resumes are up-and-coming ways of showing employers that you have the technical skills required to complete a job, but also have the creativity to take on challenges and adapt quickly to situations.

Take the time to develop your creative resume, avoid having your resume tossed in the trash, and ultimately, sit down for the interview. As the late Steve Jobs famously said, “Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That’s because they were able to connect experiences they’ve had and synthesize new things.”

photo credit: A Health Blog via photopin cc

How Social Sleuthing Can Land You A Dream Job

Written by Paul Bailey

Is your job hunt stalled because employers don’t respond to your inquiries? It’s time to rethink your communications strategy. Are you sending generic letters and resumes? Do you emphasize your skills and achievements? There’s a better way to gain an employer’s attention — and it’s easier than you may think.

Consider this — most recruiters rely on social media to check candidate profiles. Why not take a page from their playbook, and leverage social surveillance in your job search? It’s only fair. And it’s entirely free. All it takes is a little bit of digging.

Here’s how you can find helpful information and use it to ace every step of the job application process:

Start By Looking And Listening On Social Channels

Let’s say you find an ad for an attractive job. Your first step is to look at the company’s digital footprint — its primary website, as well as its blog, and presence on LinkedIn, Google+, Twitter and Facebook. At each location search for the following:

•  Hiring manager or recruiter name. Review their Linkedin profiles. Do you have anything in common, professionally? Be sure to check their interests and interview pet peeves on Facebook or Twitter.
•  Company background. Familiarize yourself with the organization’s target demographics, recent news, and products/services.
•  Someone who’s working in the position for which you’re applying. That person has the job you’re targeting for a good reason, so check what you have in common. If they have qualifications or technical knowledge you don’t, and those are related to the job, that’s a clue. Study those differences.
•  Challenges the company and its industry are facing. Prepare two or three suggestions on how you could help address those issues.
•  Company values, vision and mission. This is required baseline knowledge for anyone who wants to be considered a serious job contender in the social era.

Next Steps: Put Information To Use 3 Ways

1) On Your Resume

Take time to customize your resume. Align your skills and credentials with the job you’re pursuing. Highlight related achievements, too.

Remember your research on the person who already has the job you’re seeking? Look at how that person describes the job, and think about how you could insert skills or tasks on your resume that fit with that description. (Of course, don’t list these skills unless you really have them. Authenticity trumps all.)

2) On Your Cover Letter

Don’t start your cover letter with “Dear Sir/Madam” or “To Whom It May Concern.” Address the the recruiter or hiring manager directly.

Include key phrases from the job ad, and pair them with some phrases from the company’s mission/vision/values. For example, instead of writing “analyst with five years’ experience in banking,” say “analyst with a get-it-done attitude and five years’ experience in banking” (where “get-it-done attitude” is part of the company’s values).

You might think this is cheesy, but it gives the recruiter a subliminal signal that says, “Hey, this candidate will do well in our culture.” It’s also much better than using generic cliché phrases, such as “hardworking,” “honest” or “quick learner.”

3) In Interviews

Use your knowledge of the interviewer’s LinkedIn and Facebook profiles to break the ice. If you don’t have anything in common, try talking about their interests.

Don’t say something like, “I saw you worked at Chase Bank for two years. I worked there as an intern!” This ruins the ice-breaker because the recruiter will sense you’re trying too hard to establish rapport, and it reveals that you’ve been snooping on social sites.

Mention whatever it is you have in common, but don’t drag the recruiter into it. Say, “I was an intern at Chase Bank.” It’s likely that the recruiter will respond by acknowledging his history there.

Assuming you can establish rapport, the next step is to reinforce why you’re the best candidate for the job by eliminating the competition. This is where most of your research will pay off.

Asking questions makes you stand out from the hundreds who simply shake hands and say, “Thank you for your time.” Ask about the challenges new hires encounter, then tell a story about how you successfully handled similar challenges. Your awareness of current employees’ skills will be helpful, as you highlight your job-specific knowledge and competence with necessary tools. If you can confidently use the jargon or lingo associated with the job, use it.

Ask about the challenges faced by the company or industry, then share suggestions you’ve prepared in advance. However, don’t overdo it. Your task is to portray yourself as a problem-solver, not a know-it-all.

The next time you want to apply for a job, do research before you send an application. Customize your resume and cover letter for every job application you send. And use the intelligence to prepare yourself to stand out from the crowd.

Have you tried these techniques in a job search? How did they work for you? What other ideas do you recommend? Share you comments below.

168e7dae52120ad8976f5b.L._V388018754_(About the author:
Paul Bailey is a certified professional coach and business improvement consultant with more than 12 years of experience. He specializes in helping people realize their potential and unleash their inner confidence, so they can find meaningful work that matches their skills and values. Learn more about Paul and his coaching services at Impact Coaching & Mentoring.
Or connect with Paul on Twitter or Google+.

(Editor’s note: This post is republished from Brazen Life, with permission. Brazen Life is a lifestyle and career blog for ambitious young professionals. Hosted by Brazen Careerist, it offers edgy and fun ideas for navigating the changing world of work. Be Brazen!)

(Also Note: To discuss World of Work topics like this with others in the TalentCulture community, join our online #TChat Events every Wednesday, from 6:30-8pm ET. Everyone is welcome for events, or to join our ongoing Twitter conversation anytime. Learn more…)

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