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#WorkTrends Recap: The Future of Work: Purpose, Productivity and Experience

The future of work is here. More specifically, the future of our workplaces is here. Companies are realizing the value of focusing on the environment for their employees. Creating a more human-centered workplace has a lasting impact on employees, the company, and the bottom-line as a whole.

A place of work is a living environment that helps individuals and businesses craft and experience a rewarding fusion of life and work.  An embedded experience is a primary differentiator whenever individuals engage with an organization and it should play a core role within every company – both strategically and operationally.

This week on #WorkTrends host Meghan M. Biro welcomed Michael Jordan, Leader of the JLL People & Process consulting practice, to discuss why the workplace is more than a property or building.

Here are a few key points that Michael shared:

  • Employee demographics can have a lot to do with how companies decide workplace style and corporate real estate portfolio
  • 47% of workers said that being able to concentrate is the top priority in the workplace, but they still need to be able to collaborate
  • Your experience with the workplace starts way before you get to the office

Did you miss the show? You can listen to the #WorkTrends podcast on our BlogTalk Radio channel here: http://bit.ly/2w1kHkQ

You can also check out the highlights of the conversation from our Storify here:

Didn’t make it to this week’s #WorkTrends show? Don’t worry, you can tune in and participate in the podcast and chat with us every Wednesday from 1-2pm ET (10-11am PT).

Remember, the TalentCulture #WorkTrends conversation continues every day across several social media channels. Stay up-to-date by following our #WorkTrends Twitter stream; pop into our LinkedIn group to interact with other members. Engage with us any time on our social networks, or stay current with trending World of Work topics on our website or through our weekly email newsletter.

Photo Credit: Tony Worrall Flickr via Compfight cc

#WorkTrends Preview: The Future of Work: Purpose, Productivity and Experience

The future of work is here. More specifically, the future of our workplaces is here. Companies are realizing the value of focusing on the environment for their employees. Creating a more human-centered workplace has a lasting impact on employees, the company, and the bottom-line as a whole.

A place of work is a living environment that helps individuals and businesses craft and experience a rewarding fusion of life and work. Experience is a primary differentiator whenever individuals engage with an organization, and should play a core role in every company – both strategically and operationally.

Join #WorkTrends host Meghan M. Biro and her special guest Michael Jordan, Leader of the JLL People & Process consulting practice on Wednesday, August 23, 2017, at 1pm ET as they discuss why the workplace is more than a property or building.

The Future of Work: Purpose, Productivity and Experience

#WorkTrends Preview: The Future of Work: Purpose, Productivity and ExperienceJoin Michael and Meghan on our LIVE online podcast Wednesday, Aug 23 — 1 pm ET / 10 am PT.

Immediately following the podcast, the team invites the TalentCulture community over to the #WorkTrends Twitter stream to continue the discussion. We encourage everyone with a Twitter account to participate as we gather for a live chat, focused on these related questions:

Q1: What is a human centered workplace?  #WorkTrends (Tweet this question)

Q2: Why are engagement, empowerment and fulfillment important?  #WorkTrends (Tweet this question)

Q3: What can be achieved with a human centered workplace? #WorkTrends (Tweet this question)

Don’t want to wait until next Wednesday to join the conversation? You don’t have to. I invite you to check out the #WorkTrends Twitter feed and our TalentCulture World of Work Community LinkedIn group. Share your questions, ideas and opinions with our awesome community.

Photo Credit: ebizworldwide Flickr via Compfight cc

New Data on Impact of Office Design and Décor

We’ve known about the importance of work environments for some time now. In a 2003 survey by Management Today, 97 percent of respondents said they regard their workplace as a symbol of whether or not they are valued by their employer. While this shouldn’t come as a surprise, there’s a disheartening new layer to the story. According to data we compiled from a recent survey of 1,000 Americans who work in traditional office environments (no freelancers, retailers or astronauts), many employers fail to create inspiring, uplifting work environments.

Office decor infographics

In many cases, employers aren’t taking care of basic elements that most people associate with a pleasant, welcoming, modern workplace. One in three people report there are no plants at their offices and one in four say there is no art. Those are special accents, you say—reserved only for the privileged businesses that can afford them? Consider this: 45 percent of the people we surveyed have little to no natural light in their environment and 46 percent say the design and décor in their workplace lends it no personality whatsoever.

Light, according to our survey, is the most significant factor that shapes an office environment and the feelings of the workers in that environment. And it’s not just about feelings either—yes, people who report having “a lot” of natural light in their workplace are more likely to say they feel comfortable and uplifted in that environment, but they’re also 35 percent more likely to say their environment increases productivity. It doesn’t end there. A study by Northwestern Medicine and the University of Illinois found people exposed to more light at work had longer, healthier sleep schedules.

Furniture is another key element that affects a person’s experience of their work environment, both in terms of comfort and aesthetics. For the most part, American workers are happy with their office furniture. Seventy-nine percent are satisfied with its appearance and 82 percent are satisfied with its comfort. But when it’s not right, it’s really not right—the people who reported their furniture situation is “bad” were three times more likely to feel their environment hurts productivity and two times more likely to consider it depressing. As it stands now, just one in four people say they would be proud to show their office environment to friends and family. It’s doesn’t have to be that way! If you’re one of the seventy-five percent who aren’t proud, show our data to your boss, share a link on social, spread the word to let people know that designing an inspired workplace isn’t just a good thing to do, it’s the right thing to do for the health of a business.

This post was first published on Pots Planters and more.

Photo Credit: marksley Flickr via Compfight cc