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“No Labels” Workforce: Sneak Peek Videos

(Editorial Note: Want to read the RECAP of this week’s events? See The Best-of-All-Ages Workplace #TChat Recap)

Age discrimination. Sometimes it’s very subtle. Sometimes it’s painfully obvious. Either way, it still can play a role in workplace culture. How can organizations move beyond the labels that hold back individuals, teams and corporate performance?

That’s our focus this week in the TalentCulture community. Our guests sat down for several minutes in Google+ Hangouts with me to discuss several key issues. Check it out:

One of our very own #TChat Ambassadors, Ashley Lauren Perez, defines key terms and offers advice for professionals who are considered part of “Generation Y”…

Next, Ashley’s boss, John Wilson, Founder and CEO WilsonHCG.com briefly explains why labels don’t make sense in the world of work…

It promises to be a fascinating week! The more voices who join the conversation, the better.

So join us at #TChat events this week, where we’ll take a closer look at labels in the workplace, and how to build cultures that value diversity in all of its forms:

NOTE: If you don’t see the G+ Hangout videos above in this post, you can watch them on YouTube:

"No Labels" Workforce: Sneak Peek Videos

(Editorial Note: Want to read the RECAP of this week’s events? See The Best-of-All-Ages Workplace #TChat Recap)

Age discrimination. Sometimes it’s very subtle. Sometimes it’s painfully obvious. Either way, it still can play a role in workplace culture. How can organizations move beyond the labels that hold back individuals, teams and corporate performance?

That’s our focus this week in the TalentCulture community. Our guests sat down for several minutes in Google+ Hangouts with me to discuss several key issues. Check it out:

One of our very own #TChat Ambassadors, Ashley Lauren Perez, defines key terms and offers advice for professionals who are considered part of “Generation Y”…

Next, Ashley’s boss, John Wilson, Founder and CEO WilsonHCG.com briefly explains why labels don’t make sense in the world of work…

It promises to be a fascinating week! The more voices who join the conversation, the better.

So join us at #TChat events this week, where we’ll take a closer look at labels in the workplace, and how to build cultures that value diversity in all of its forms:

NOTE: If you don’t see the G+ Hangout videos above in this post, you can watch them on YouTube:

Is It Time to Hire Yourself? #TChat Recap

(Editorial Note: Talent Science Expert, Dr. Janice Presser, led our community through a week of memorable #TChat events focused on weathering today’s rough employment waters. She adds these parting insights – focused on trends that deserve additional thought by anyone who cares about carving out a career path – or creating new jobs – or hiring creatively. For a list of links to this week’s archived events and resources, look beneath Dr. Janice’s commentary. Thanks!)

I hope we can agree on one thing: unemployment isn’t good for anyone. It’s not just that idle hands are the devil’s workshop, but that long-term unemployment scares all of us, even the currently employed. And that fear erodes our engagement, reduces our productivity, and stifles our innovative spirit.

Entrepreneurs play a major part in driving innovation and a growing economy. According to a study by the Kauffman Foundation (the world’s largest non-profit foundation dedicated to the support of entrepreneurship), entrepreneurs and their startup teams are, and have been, the ONLY source of net new jobs in almost every year since 1977! (The chart below reveals how startups have consistently created new jobs, compared to existing organizations.)

JobsChart Dr JaniceUnfortunately, the balance between jobs disappearing and jobs being created is only part of the problem. Are you trapped in a job that you really don’t fit, or worse, trapped in one that makes you miserable? Without a vibrant job market, getting ‘stuck’ like this has become a serious problem.

My Advice

If you’re entrepreneurial, give your ideas a chance. Organizations that help start-ups are popping up everywhere. Find a way to ‘bootstrap’ your idea with the help of anyone who’s willing to help you – especially if they approach the challenge from directions you haven’t thought of yet.

If you’re in HR, please recognize that resumes are losing their relevance, and work requirements are being transformed. Look to the emerging field of Talent Science for alternatives. For most jobs, understanding how a person ‘teams’ with others is at least as important as current and past employment. (Have you noticed that 401k documents say something like ‘past performance is not a guarantee of future performance”? That’s because it isn’t.)

If you’re looking, resist the temptation to apply for jobs you know you are likely to hate. Take some time to learn how you really want to contribute to the mission of an organization. Then articulate the key points, and communicate them widely. Social media – it’s not just for socializing any more.

@DrJanice

Speaking of social media – how did the TalentCulture community leverage social channels to address this issue throughout the past week? Check out the resources below:

#TChat Week-in-Review

KevinMatuszak_TalentCulture_G.plushangoutvid

Watch the #TChat Sneak Peek video now…

SUN 2/10
TalentCulture Founder, Meghan M. Biro outlined the need for smarter hiring strategies in her Forbes.com post: Four Reasons Leaders Hire in 3D.

G+ Hangout Video: Sneak peek interview with special #TChat guest Kevin Matuszak (@Tooozy), who talks about his creative #HireKevin campaign to gain a position as the face of Applebee’s.

MON 2/11
#TChat preview post Narrowing the Unemployment Gaps outlined the week’s core theme and questions.

TChatRadio_logo_020813

Listen to the radio show recording now…

TUE 2/12
#TChat Radio Show: Dr. Janice joined radio hosts Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman to discuss core issues and opportunities in today’s job market – and how employers should rethink current recruiting practices for everyone’s benefit.

WED 2/13
#TChat Twitter: Dr. Janice and Kevin Matuszak were on hand again, as #TChat-ters gathered around the Twitter stream to share ideas and opinions about why companies should act more creatively in filling talent gaps, and what unemployed workers can do to move their professional agendas forward. To see highlights from yesterday’s #TChat Twitter forum, watch the Storify slideshow below.

#TChat INSIGHTS Slide Show: “Narrowing the Unemployment Gaps”
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Closing Notes & Highlights Slideshow

SPECIAL THANKS: Another shout out to Dr. Janice Presser, CEO of The Gabriel Institute and architect of the underlying technology that powers Teamability™, as well as Kevin Matuszak, the mastermind behind the viral #HireKevin job campaign. You both caused us to think more creatively and carefully about what matters in hiring decisions and processes.

NOTE TO BLOGGERS: Did this week’s events inspire you to write about hiring job trends, recruiting practices or other workplace issues? We’re happy to share your thoughts. Just post a link on Twitter (include #TChat or @TalentCulture), or insert a comment below, and we’ll pass it along.

NEW LINKEDIN GROUP: Did you hear? We’ve expanded to LinkedIn! Come on over anytime to the TalentCulture – World of Work forum!

WHAT’S AHEAD: Next week – we’ll look at the human side of business through a different lens, as we examine the importance of “Brand Humanization – What, Why and How” on #TChat Radio, Tuesday, Feb 19, at 7:30pm ET and on #TChat Twitter Wednesday, Feb. 20, at 7pm ET. Look for details next Monday via @TalentCulture and #TChat.

Until then – we’ll see you on the stream!

Image Credit: Stock.xchn

Employing Our Veterans: #TChat Preview

The long-term unemployed get airtime and programs to help them retrain and find new career paths. Millennials looking for the first big job, and a way to pay school loans, draw lots of attention. But we could probably spend much more time, as a society, talking about military veterans and the challenges they face reentering the civilian workforce.

Vets have tremendously strong skill sets. Depending upon their service, they may have skills such as people management, logistics, mechanical engineering, IT, aircraft repair, med tech, civil engineering/construction, language arts and more. Most importantly, they understand teamwork and the practical, rather than theoretical, value of collaboration. So why is it so hard for them to come home to civilian jobs?

The country faces huge cuts in its defense budget. The government is trying hard to wind down one war, and equally hard to avoid formal engagement on other fronts. Caught in the middle are tens of thousands of servicemen and women — and their families — who may need a slot in a shaky civilian economy. What can we do to help them? How can we best manage them? What skills do we, as leaders and HR people, need to refresh or acquire to accommodate our veterans in today’s world of work?

These are tough questions, practical and pressing concerns. And we’re going to take them on this week on #TChat. Here are a few questions to guide our discussion:

Q1: US legislation is creating skill certifications for military experience. What else could be done?
Q2: What management styles work best when leading an employee with military experience?
Q3: What’s the biggest challenge for veterans in the civilian world of work?
Q4: Does long-term loyalty help or hinder the career of a veteran in today’s workplace?
Q5: How can HR/recruiting tech help internally assess and translate veteran assets to employers?

You may not know anyone who served in a war, and you may not know much about the Korean conflict or the Vietnam War. That’s OK. Just do some research — i.e., talk to your parents, uncles, aunts and friends. Then, join us for a very special #TChat this Wednesday, Nov. 7, at 7-8pm ET (6-7pm CT, 5-6pm MT, 4-5pm PT, or wherever you are).

We’re not afraid to take on difficult topics, and we know you aren’t either.  Our guest moderator this week is Brenden “Bo” Wright (@BrendenMWright), director of information technology recruiting at Laureate Education and, as a veteran marine, a former nuclear, biological and chemical defense specialist. Yours truly (@MeghanMBiro) and the rest of the #TChat gang will be there, too. We look forward to Brenden’s thoughts and yours. Tweet with us!

Image Credit: Pixabay

Employee Engagement – Beyond the Beer Bash: #TChat Recap

Is it just me, or is the term “employee engagement” rapidly becoming a buzzword – popular as workplace window dressing, and perhaps sexy to say, but lacking in substance? If so, I think it would be a mistake to let the spin doctors snatch it without a good fight. After all, there’s plenty of industrial-strength ammo available for a winning battle.

For example, hundreds of talent-minded professionals came together yesterday for a #TChat session focused on the  “what, why and how” of employee engagement. The quantity and quality of interactions demonstrated significant depth, meaning and conviction surrounding this concept. Ideas were both grounded and inspiring – far from buzzword territory. (To see event highlights, watch the Storify slideshow at the end of this post.)

Engagement By The Numbers

But #TChat-ters aren’t the only ones who care about engagement. In a recent Aberdeen Group survey of 1300 global business leaders, employee engagement emerged as one of the top five business priorities. That really shouldn’t be a surprise. After all, engaged employees are productive employees – and productive employees drive business performance.

So, we know that company leaders think engagement counts. But that raises two related questions:

1) Is the term “engagement” universally understood? In a word, no. And that’s a problem, as TalentCulture’s Meghan Biro indicated in a recent Forbes commentary, outlining the “5 Whys” of Employee Engagement.

2) Just how engaged are today’s employees? Actually, the level is “dangerously low,” according to Aberdeen Group’s 2012 benchmark report, The Rules of Employee Engagement. How low? Here’s a reality check:

At best-in-class companies, 72% of employees rate themselves as “highly engaged.” That means, even under the best conditions, almost 30% of the workforce IS NOT highly engaged.

What To Do?

Clearly, there’s room for improvement. That’s where advice from the #TChat archives can help! Taste some of the tidbits I saw in the mix. Then for a deeper dive, check out the Storify slideshow below for full highlights. You’ll walk away with better understanding of engagement’s business value. And you might discover some useful “how to” advice along the way.

“Engagement is 11 words: ‘What do you think?’ ‘How can I help.’ ‘I trust you.'” @ValaAfshar 

“Trust = two simple words: Allow failure (or forgive failure)” @TomBolt

“…Allow failure (or forgive failure)…As long as there’s growth.” @KevinWGrossman

“Engagement is a global measure. How we do it is individualized. That’s why mgrs are CRITICAL to engagement.” @IncentIntel

“What is NOT engagement? Suggestion boxes, faceless surveys and once-per-year reviews.” @YouTernMark

“I’m not a huge fan of engagement surveys. They are mostly wasted exercise because no real study or follow through.” @afraymond

“Engagement is intellectual, emotional and physical.” @ReCenterMoment

“Engaged leaders pick up the phone when members of their teams call.” @brentskinner

“Engagement is tougher w/distributed teams. Social tools help, but we can’t rely on ‘engagement by osmosis’ anymore” @TalemetryJen

“Engagement=degree to which employees feel invested in & aligned with THEIR day-to-day experience as part of the organization.” @JsarahwatsHR

That’s #TChat. Collective insights from some of the best minds in the talent and HR community – all in one place. Freely available for the taking. The lights are always on at TalentCulture.com, so come on back whenever you need another engagement fix!

Let’s Keep The Conversation Alive

If you joined last night’s forum, which ideas mattered most to you? How will you apply them? Add comments below — or if you blog about engagement let us know by posting a Twitter link with the #TChat hashtag. We’d like to share your ideas with the TalentCulture community here and via @TalentCulture.

Coming Up on #TChat

Join us next week (Wednesday at 7pmET/4pmPT), as we continue to explore the “World of Work.” Look for a full preview next Monday via @TalentCulture and #TChat. Thanks again for your interest and your contributions!

Photo credit: Ross James Parker via Flickr

 

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#TChat INSIGHTS: Employee Engagement or Lack Thereof?

Storified by TalentCulture · Wed, Oct 17 2012 23:49:02

My coffee is ready for #tchat http://pic.twitter.com/mTbA5We6gingerconsult
@MeghanMBiro here’s one I took a while ago while trying to work on a research paper. Yum! Margarita! #tchat http://pic.twitter.com/QZ3kLMfGsterling_amanda
#TChat one of my favorite team pics! http://pic.twitter.com/LtAmbYXpMZProhov
Q1: We hear so much about lack of #employeeengagement but what exactly is “engagement” and why? #TChatMeghan M. Biro
A1 Some people simply show up to a job and some jump in to do the work.It’s not all up to positional leaders #tchat We all can lead!Susan Mazza
#tchat A1. engagement is the weak sibling to empowerment.Mary Ann Reilly
A1: Positive contributors to org success,Motivation about the goals, and morally purposeful #TChatNissrine Ghannoum
A1 It may begin w/toxic leadership (what a term!), but engagement is an iterative cycle, can be broken @ many pts. #TChatMiriam Brosseau
A1: Empowerment drives engagement. Great things are possible when everyone is accountable to get things done #tchatAlli Polin
A1. Engagement is talent without training wheels #tchatSalima Nathoo
A1: Engagement happens when the employee and corp have a relationship where both work for each other’s future. #TChatJanis Stacy
A1 Engagement> hierarchy and stuffiness makes for poor engagement. More openess can make work fun & more efficient #TChatEnzo Guardino
A1. Engagement is the motivation to perform and the safety to express ones true self at work #tchatAmanda Sterling
A1: engagement is employee buy in. If they have not bought into the mission/vision…it will be difficult to retain or train them #TChatStewart Pratt
@MeghanMBiro A1. Engagement is people from all levels of an organization interacting and being invested in success. #TChatJason Ebbing
A1: I would define #employeeengagement as aligned organizational purpose: transparent, empowered & measurable. #TchatDavid Kovacovich
A1: Engagement is showing up fully in mind, body and spirit, bringing the best of you to your work #tchatSusan Mazza
A1 Disengagement is ultimately damaging to the ees and the organization. #TChatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A1: Engagement is part immersion & part influence. Employees feel a part of what’s going on, but can also affect what goes on. #tchatTL Frasqueri-Molina
A1. I am glad to hear engagement discussed/considered in the work place, another aspect of the real world we need to educate stds on #tchatGuy Davis
A1: Engaged employees act as if they started your company. #tchatBrent Skinner
a1. Engagement begins inside #tchatMichael Clark
A1 Employee engagement happens when businesses realize that co’s are people; some orgs take longer than others to realize #tchatClaire Crossley
A1: Engaged is being invested in the outcome for the sake of the org’s/team’s success not just for personal gain #tchatSusan Mazza
A1: Employee engagement is basically whether they give a damn or want to go home. Whether their efforts feel worth it. #tchatLisa Haggis
A1 Engaged employees care about other employees and the company they work for. #tchatAl Smith
A1 engagement is treating people like grownups and expecting them to treat you the same #TChatPaul Hebert
A1. Engaged employees feel valued and critical to an organization. #tchatTerri Klass
A1 Engagement is an emotional, values-based alignment. #tchatStephen Abbott
A1) Engagement = community #tchatnancyrubin
A1: Often there is an engagement gap because employees do not understand objectives, or the why behind what they are doing #tchatIrene Becker
A1: We’ve all been insanely busy, but not wanting to be there. #Engagement’s that, but interacting & wanting to be there. #tchatBrent Skinner
A1: Engagement makes people want to hold themselves accountable to being and doing their best #tchatAlli Polin
A1: Engaged employees care just as much about the outcome of the organization as you do. #TChatSpark Hire
A1: Engagement is giving our full attention to our teams and our employees #tchatJen Olney
A1: Engaged by heart&Mind:Loyalty, Saying good things about the org,Striving Innovation,Commitment to quality mission,Motivation #TChatNissrine Ghannoum
A1. Engagement means an alignment with employees feeling authentically connected to an org and its values. #tchatTerri Klass
A1: You’re paying attention, and you’re enjoying that. #tchatBrent Skinner
A1. Great question..its the process of keeping workers connected to the org’s goals, mission and vision. #tchatChris Fields
@JsarahwatsHRA1. Engagement=degree to which employees feel invested in & aligned with THEIR day-to-day experience as part of the .. #TchatSai Krishna D.
#tchat A1 Employee engagement is also about enabling everyone to love their mission enough to play an active role in it.Bruno Coelho
A1: Engagement is allowing others to have a voice, creativity and freedom of expression, and giving them permission to crush it! #tchatSusan Avello
A1 EE demonstrates via behavior, performance & attitude:desire-loyalty-excitement-interest-passion-commitment-enthusiasm 4 job/career #TChatDonna Rogers, SPHR
A1: Meaning I dig my work, my crew and even the mother ship. I’m all in (or mostly). #tchatKevin W. Grossman
a1. Forget professional, personal, internal, external; just engage. #tchatMichael Clark
A1: Employees understanding how their particular task affects the outcome of the business, and keeping them excited about it. #tchatJoshua Barger
#tchat A1 if you truly work as a team each member is so engaged each day or project a different member may emerge as the leader.Sage Bramhall
A1. with college students engagement means activity beyond the classroom, working on campus, volunteering, student orgs, tutoring etc #tchatGuy Davis
A1: Someone who is engaged cares and shows it in everything they do as well as their way of being with others #tchatSusan Mazza
A1 – knowing why i’m here and being able to make an impact #TChatPaul Hebert
A1 Engagement is a people strategy that keeps the right employees engaged in the right position for the long haul #TChatLeAnna J. Carey
A1 Too much focus on buy-in for vision/mission & not enuf on ppl’s daily experience. Engagmnt a daily battle, not 1-time sales pitch #TchatJane Watson
A1: Engagement is connection & passion for the work & org that make people want to go the extra mile #tchatAlli Polin
A1 Engagement is an emotional commitment to your work – #TChatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A1: engagement is going beyond- a feeling of empowerment and pride in what one does. Fuels passion and curiosity #tchatMegan Rene Burkett
A1. intrinsic employee motivation, loyalty and promotion. The higher the engagement the more an ee becomes a magnet for talent #tchatJen PhillipsKirkwood
A1. Engagement=degree to which employees feel invested in & aligned with THEIR day-to-day experience as part of the organization #TchatJane Watson
#tchat A1 Employee engagement is about everyone knowing the reason why they exist and why does it matter.Bruno Coelho
A1: a way to manage talent retention, hold off attrition and boost productivity and job satisfaction << SMILES? #TChatMeghan M. Biro
A1: An engaged
employee is passionate, involved in, and knowledgeable about the business – inside and out of their own realm #tchatJoshua Barger
A1 Engagement is a soft word – many meanings – dependent on context – too easy to gloss over real meaning #TChatPaul Hebert
A1: Engagement is the intangible desire to go “above and beyond” for your work #TChatAlex Raymond
A1: Engaged leaders pick up the phone when members of their teams call. #TChatBrent Skinner
Q2: Is it simply toxic #leadership that affects culture and engagement, or more than that? #TChatMeghan M. Biro
A2 Two kinds of contract: Employment and Psychological. When Psych contract gets broken engagement tanks. #tchatKeith Punches
A2: Hiring ppl that aren’t passionate about what they do, and what you do, affects engagement for all – whether they’re mgmt or not. #tchatBright.com
A2 the trad construct of jobs that separates ppl into “boxes” is antithetical to engaging-shift focus to what connects vs. separates #tchatSusan Mazza
A2: Toxic leaders are usually just lazy. Positive, motivated leaders are not toxic by default #tchatTamera RousseauVesta
a2 It goes beyond toxic leadership. Right people for the right job. Keeping people engaged. Work that is rewarding. #tchatShawn LaCroix
a2. Look people in the eye and communicate. #tchatMichael Clark
A2: It’s not the title that leads, it’s the person and if you are in a position to influence with toxic behavior you spread others #tchatJen Olney
A2: Toxic leaders come in several varieties. The leaders themselves might be the disengaged ones. #tchatBrent Skinner
A2: Folks making it sound like employees are un-empowered, scaredy cats. Toxic leaders are devastating if we let them be. #tchatTL Frasqueri-Molina
a2. Stop trying to tell people not be negative. #tchatMichael Clark
A2 So how hard is it to say – “You matter” – #TChatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A2: Engagement happens in the trenches. Great leaders empower transparency – others stay out of the way and let culture form #tchatDavid Kovacovich
a2. Dear leadership: Please be open and honest, tell employees the truth #tchatMichael Clark
A2. Toxic leaders should be banned from organizations. #tchatTerri Klass
A2—Orgs are as problematic/awesome as their people—but toxic #leadership can spread disease like dirty water if everyone drinks. #TChat (RP)Shawna Kelly
A2 It’s a lack of ability and/or commitment to make sure people know how and why they matter HERE AND NOW #tchatSusan Mazza
A2: When people are connected to clients, colleagues, inspiring work – the damage from a toxic leader is less but not gone #tchatAlli Polin
A2. No, that no the only thing…internal and external forces are kill engagement…hiring practices and compensation packages .#tchatChris Fields
A2 Leaders of culture selfless, they acknowledge that it doesn’t matter who gets the credit, and teach this to their followers. #tchatMark Clements
A2 Toxicity needs to be neutralized at the training stage otherwise the venom grows stronger with age #TChatEnzo Guardino
A2: Toxic leaders breed toxic cultures. #tchatJen Olney
A2: Toxic #leadership isn’t the only thing which affects culture & engagement but may be enough for killing both. #TChatJanis Stacy
a2. People must learn how to transform toxicity into enhanced engagement, performance and productivity. #tchatMichael Clark
A2 In toxic environments, it’s impossible to challenge orthodoxies – which is a characteristic of healthy organizations #TChatLeAnna J. Carey
A2: The rotten apple in the barrel syndrome. One toxic leader among other leaders can bring the org down. #TChatTom Bolt
A2. Trickle down effect. If the leader cannot even be engaged or positive, how can employees? Lead by example. #TchatLexie Forman Ortiz
A2: A toxic culture is more devastating than a toxic leader. The nearer to the top of the org chart the more harmful to engagement. #TChatTom Bolt
A2. we look up to leaders, it’s never a good sign if your leader isn’t engaged. it’s all about the energy #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
A2 I believe it’s more, you can have great leadership but despite that, a team & peers that suck the life out of you #tchatClaire Crossley
A2: No way! You can make toxic hires too. Used to run large call center. Only takes a few to infect others w/ sinister attitudes. #TChatStephen Van Vreede
A2 A lack of alignment with engagement, organizationally, as well. Rewards, etc. #TChatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A2: Toxic “employeeship” sometimes causes the lack of #engagement. #tchatBrent Skinner
A2: One good leader can’t fix culture and engagement on their own. They need cooperation within the org for any change to stick #tchatRebecca Jo Luke
A2: Any number of factors can break down engagement in the ecosystem that is your culture. Leadership is a big one. #tchatLisa Haggis
A2: I’ve seen how a group of committed, engaged employees overcome toxic leader, so it’s just not the leadership that is influential #tchatTL Frasqueri-Molina
a2. Typically, the higher you climb in an organization, the less likely you are to think you’re wrong about anything. #tchatMichael Clark
A2: Toxic leadership hurts but so does lack of career path, unclear vision, lack of community… #tchatAlli Polin
A2: The expectations of excellence and commitment start at the top #tchatJen Olney
A2. I do think we can have idealized, unrealistic view of engagement. Not possible for everyone, everyday to be engaged. TPS reports? #TchatJane Watson
A2. #Leadership can affect culture but so can toxic employees, I have seen both #tchatGuy Davis
A2: Toxic leaders can certainly derail engagement and the company as a whole, but even good leaders can have disengaged employees. #tchatSabrina Baker
A2: Toxic leadership is the #1 problem in business. Gr8 cultures can’t exist within such environments. #TChatJohn R. Bell
A2: it’s self awareness, it’s being a fit- alignment with the role and culture, it’s stimulating dialogue. Many factors in ee #tchatMegan Rene Burkett
A2 Either toxic leadership, or weak leadership that allows toxic activity within the organization. Either way, it’s about leadership. #tchatStephen Abbott
A2: Toxicity can leech into our engagement supply from all over the frickin’ place. #tchatKevin W. Grossman
A2: It’s toxicity at all, regardless of where it comes from – leadership or folks on the line – we’re all a part of the ecosystem #tchatTL Frasqueri-Molina
A2: The top leaders set the tone and their level of engagement is palatable throughout their organizations. #tchatJen Olney
A2. it plays a part, especially if leadership kills any chances for employees to be engaged on their own #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
a2. I call employee break rooms toxic waste dumps #tchatMichael Clark
a2. Every person must become responsible for toxic words, emotional states and reactions. #tchatMichael Clark
A2. Definitely a big factor, but org structural issues (excess bureaucracy, limited communication/collaboration) major culprits too #TchatJane Watson
A2: Everything moves from the top down. Toxic leaders derail engagement, but ther are other factors also. #tchatIrene Becker
A2: Toxic leadership / toxic coworkers can shrivel employee engagement. If it isn’t pleasant, nobody’s gonna be excited 2 b there! #tchatDawn Rasmussen
A2 engagement is a choice – not a reaction #TChatPaul Hebert
#tchat A2 Leadership is the one thing that affects everything. Leaders help answer the question: why should I put my Heart+Soul into this?Bruno Coelho
A2 leadership only one part of culture- other part is the empls – they have responsibilit
y too #TChatPaul Hebert
A2: Toxic leadership is definitely a huge contributor, as leaders set the tone, but EE apathy can make it spiral out of control #tchatJoshua Barger
A2 Two kinds of contract: Employment and Psychological. When Psych contract gets broken engagement tanks. #tchatKeith Punches
A2 Broken unspoken employment contract between comps and ees created the prob IMHO #TChatPaul Hebert
Q3 Are stretch assignments and risk-taking important to employee engagement? Why or why not? #TChatMeghan M. Biro
@MeghanMBiro #tchat A3: idle hands are the devils playgroundBurke Allen
A3. May depend on who you are classing as employees – all those who work on behalf of an org, or just those on the perm payroll? #tchatBelinda Johnson
A3 if you are there 40+ hours a week you might as well do a good job and help others #tchatShawn LaCroix
A3. Choose stretch assignments in partnership with employee and boss. #tchatTerri Klass
A3: The nine box model has room for risk takers & stretchers but still embraces others that are engaged & contributing #tchatAlli Polin
A3: Yes -your top employees want to continue to grow & it’s to your business’ benefit to let them. Calculated risks are a good thing. #tchatBright.com
A3 Stretchable = Flexible. Employees are like reeds in the wind just don’t blow too hard #tchatEnzo Guardino
A3: Blocking Social Media at work shows lack of trust, = a HUGE engagement killer! It can be so powerful in workplace! #tchatSusan Avello
a3. Engagement and growth are two sides of the same experience #tchatMichael Clark
A3. Stretch assignments made me a better pro, but I have supervised people that could handle nothing beyond the formal job descp, sad #tchatGuy Davis
A3: There is a need to celebrate even small wins, while also modeling and teaching the skill of failing fwd #tchatIrene Becker
A3 Not everyone wants “enriched” work – and that’s ok. #TChatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A3 Yes! Helps gives employees a sense of ownership & builds trust. Employers can see employees full potential as well. #TChatAmy Do
A3 but it’s balance. Do you really WANT to build a cadre of Entrepreneurs? Better lock your IP down (some would say) #tchatKeith Punches
A3 Risk taking is key to growth personally & organizationally – equipping employees w/skills results in engagement #TChatLeAnna J. Carey
A3 stretch goals require a partnership between the person asking and the person doing – when both engage success is inevitable #tChatSusan Mazza
A3: engaging organizational initiatives start with a person and a belief in positive change. No one cares if no one tries. #tchatDavid Kovacovich
A3. Stagnation leads to disengagement. #tchatTerri Klass
A3: Absolutely, challenges at work are an excellent vehicle for personal & professional growth #TChatSean Charles
A3 What doesn’t bend, breaks. (To quote Ani in an unexpected setting…) #TChatMiriam Brosseau
a3. If an employee does not feel like they can stretch and grow, they’re gone. #tchatMichael Clark
A3 if you’re not growing you’re……………………………….. #tchatKeith Punches
A3: A “stretch” assignment would need to mean that you know the #strengths + abilities of your folks. Important thing to remember. #TChatAndrew Henck
A3: Stretch assignments won’t spark a *culture* of engagement org-wide, but they might engage one disengaged employee. #tchatBrent Skinner
A3 How do you find the right stretch assignment for you or your ees? #TChatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A3: Let employees show us what they can do instead of assuming they’re not ready or able #tchatAlli Polin
A3 “stretches” will be viewed with disdain if failures outnumber successes #tchatSteve
A3 stretch assignments are a great way to hold people accountable for being and doing their best #tchat ppl doing great work are engagedSusan Mazza
A3: They’re important to a) employee development which is important to b) employee engagement. If no a), then fire b). #tchatKevin W. Grossman
A3. Risk taking can be just what the doctor ordered if an individual and their boss partner together. #tchatTerri Klass
A3 stretch assignments are first and foremost opportunities to make the entire company better #tchatSteve
A3: it depends on the employee and what is going to help each individual get the best results. #TChatSpark Hire
A3. A stretch assignment helps talent grow into their leadership skin. #tchatSalima Nathoo
A3 It’s always very positive to find out that you can do (be) way more than you ever thought possible ~ stretch & risk > #tchatCASUDI
A3 Huge believer in the stretch assignment – how else to you challenge what you have “under the hood”? #TChatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A3 if I’m not challenged it’s not a good day. #tchatKeith Punches
A3: Risk taking is important in cultures where failure is accepted… otherwise, fear will rule & engagement even lower #tchatAlli Polin
A3: Employees who want to be challenged will accept it, but careful not to impose the assignments – they have to be willing to engage #tchatJen Olney
A3. Stretch assignments can really motivate people to perform at a higher level and grow in their career. #tchatTerri Klass
A3 Any org culture that is focused on learning + growth will encourage + equip folks to take risks (new role/project/etc.). #TChatAndrew Henck
A3. playing it safe is not progression. we are human- we progress. our needs to be engaged change. we need to risk to discover. #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
A3. Yes, in that they’re features of orgs that trust employees, are not overly rigid, place value on employee learning & innovation #TchatJane Watson
A3: Challenging employees to go outside of their comfort zone increases engagement but not tossing in the deep end of the pool 2 swim #TChatTom Bolt
A3: Stretch assignments and risk taking are important for some, not others but does let mgmt know the character of the employee! #TChatJanis Stacy
A3: YES! Employees want to be challenged and grow. Nobody likes dead ends #tchatAlli Polin
A3 Stretching employees that are willing and eager to develop is fantastic. The challenge is stretching complacent employees #tchatShawn LaCroix
A3 risk taking is required for learning and growth – seeing progress is #1 thing for engagement #TChatPaul Hebert
A3: IMO it’s a good indicator of engagement if an EE is willing to go outside their comfort zone for what they believe (the company) #tchatJoshua Barger
A3 stretch assignments signal trust and value #TChatPaul Hebert
Q4: What can employees do to improve their own mindful engagement investment? What about leaders? #TChat #TChatMark Babbitt
A4 want to mindfully engage? get CURIOUS, especially about the people you work with — they are always so much more than u see.#tchatSusan Mazza
a4. Do you know how to show love for someone in a professional manner? #tchatMichael Clark
A4: In addition to offering suggestions outside of your area, taking the initiative and being involved in the project #tchatJoshua Barger
a4. People easily engage with people that care. #tchatMichael Clark
A4: Approach your leader as if he or she is partially a partner. Good leaders will welcome this. #tchatBrent Skinner
a4. Listening demands internal silence. Do you know how to stop thoughts? #tchatMichael Clark
A4: Message to Leaders (especially CEOs): Like life, there’s more to business than just making money. #TchatJohn R. Bell
A4 employees can choose to do work that they enjoy and that matters to them to begin with – don;t just settle for a job #tchatSusan Mazza
A4. constantly ask ma
nagers about opportunities to learn/shadow. They can point you in the right direction #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
A4. leaders need to communicate openly and honestly, the single mom with 3 kids may be as engaged as she can at that point in time #tchatGuy Davis
A4: Leaders must lead from within. …within the team, not outside it. #tchatBrent Skinner
a4. Consciously engage moment-to-moment, day-to-day, week-to-week, year-to-year life-long #tchatMichael Clark
Amen! “@SocialMediaSean: A4: Avoid workplace drama at all costs and invest time in positive relationships #TChat”Miriam Brosseau
A4 it’s easier if you OWN your piece of the process. Find ways to improve it, tinker with doing things better. “Polish your Peace”.. #tchatKeith Punches
A4. don’t let anyone make you feel like you feel like you are stuck. fight to grow and learn- everyday #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
A4: Leaders need to lose the “my way or the highway” mentality & employees need to let their voices be heard #tchatAlli Polin
a4. Learn, practice and experience power tools and real-time strategies for transforming engagement . #tchatMichael Clark
A4 technique: List your EOY goals so you can see them every day and write down each day’s progress towards these #GrowthChart #tchatSteve
A4: Offer solutions not just complaints #tchatJen Olney
A4 Listen. Actively listen. #TchatAmy Do
A4. Keep an open mind and heart. #tchatTerri Klass
A4: Employees can continue their education/learn new skills. Leaders can help them put that to use. #tchatBright.com
A4: Be a 360 degree leader – extend beyond your official title. #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
A4: Employees can drive results. Share ideas & solutions. Seek out opportunities. Does require strong #leadership to support #tchatErin Colleen Goodell
A4 Invest in yourself (leader or employee) by continually Learning. #tchatCASUDI
A4. First step for employees is to access if they are in the right position 4growth-if not, seek stretch position #TChatLeAnna J. Carey
A4: Be the wind beneath the wings of the team. Communicate with ALL. Sometimes the cheerleader is responsible for points scored. #tchatBeverly Davis
a4. Effective engagement does not happen by accident or good intentions #tchatMichael Clark
A4: Avoid workplace drama at all costs and invest time in positive relationships #TChatSean Charles
A4. Leaders need to set tone – ask people for their opinions (& listen to what they say); be open to alternate ways of reaching goals #TchatJane Watson
a4. Physical engagement: transforming negative reactions into creative choices, reducing stress and enhancing well being. #tchatMichael Clark
A4. take initiative. try to learn more about the company other than what their role restricts them to. network, innovate, grow. #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
#tchat A4 Just because you’re an employee doesn’t mean you’re not a leader. Who’s leading your Life? Use everything to become ALL you can beBruno Coelho
A4 at some level all employees have to think like consultants-ask “why?” often, practice #LateralThinking, spend time with customers #tchatSteve
A4. Expect more of yourself and meet it before scheduling a meeting with your manager to transfer responsibility. #tchatSalima Nathoo
a4. Emotional engagement: improving how we experience, manage, transform and communicate emotional states. #tchatMichael Clark
A4: Leaders need to ask more questions and wait for answers before filling the silence #tchatAlli Polin
A4: See question #3 — stretch assignments and risk taking. #tchatKevin W. Grossman
A4 employees Be open minded. Leaders should ask questions and listen. A lot. #tchatAl Smith
a4. Intellectual engagement: improving how we think and speak. #tchatMichael Clark
A4: Take accountability for their work,pride in their own individual leadership w/in and be willing to step up when the time presents #tchatJen Olney
a4. Everyone can learn how to effectively engage intellectually, emotionally and physically #tchatMichael Clark
A4 Open up the “engagement” conversation with yourself (then your boss.) #TChatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A4 communicate, communicate, communicate #TChatPaul Hebert
A4: Make the time for relationships & communication – not just cranking out the work #tchatAlli Polin
A4 if toxic environment shift focus away from pleasing management to just doing the best job YOU can do. #tchatKeith Punches
A4. Leaders need to encourage continual learning for their teams to feel engaged. #tchatTerri Klass
A4. Employees should explore how their role fits into larger org; seek out expert colleagues & learn from them; shake up routine! #TchatJane Watson
A4: Question status quo, be respectful, offer alternatives. #TChatTom Bolt
A4: Focus on personal development regardless of work culture #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
A4) Form a support group or start a twitter chat (just kidding….I think) #tchatnancyrubin
A4 take an active role in career and job planning – not wait for reviews and mgrs to tell what to do #TChatPaul Hebert
A4 look at your paycheck…look at the unemployment numbers…look in the mirror #tchatSteve
A4 decide what they want – what they like – where they want to be #TChatPaul Hebert
A4: Practice mindfulness before heading to work. Yes, really. #tchatBrent Skinner
A4. Employees must see learning and growing as a way of work life. #tchatTerri Klass
A4: Asking good questions is a sign of mindful engagement. #TChatAndrew Henck
A4: Employees and leaders are not always different people :) #tchatTL Frasqueri-Molina
A4: Keep lines of communication open. For ideas to be heard you have to listen first… Two way street. #TChatTom Bolt
Q5: How can technology facilitate and improve employee engagement? How can it hurt? #TChat #TChatMark Babbitt
A5: Without tech, there’d be no #TChat. But there’d still be a world of work. :-)Brent Skinner
A5: For this Engineer, Technology IS the biggest reason to be engaged at work! #TChatJanis Stacy
Precisely! @TerriKlass A5. We need to use both technology and relationship building side by side to engage. #tchatErin Colleen Goodell
A5 At this moment I’m using tech as a tool to engage. Love it. Feel connected, free to share. Tech can enhance connection, commitment #tchatExpertus
a5. People detest change and cling to comfort zones, tech is a brave new world changing by the second. #tchatMichael Clark
a5. People are more afraid of being social than understanding how to integrate tech. #tchatMichael Clark
#TChat a5: tech can limit engagement too- leaving some employees feeling overwhelmed and silencedMegan Rene Burkett
A5 Need to use the tool that fits the job- social media, tangible tech, f2f. We have them all at our disposal, must use wisely. #TChatMiriam Brosseau
A5: Saw some Yammer success stories. In my old org? It was quiet… silent… except for HR/Mktg >no engament #tchatAlli Polin
A5: Technology helps geographically dispersed teams remain engaged. That’s all I got on this one tonight. :-( #tchatBrent Skinner
A5 I would MUCH rather have a Fireside or Brown Bag Chat with the CEO than a tech solution. #tchatKeith Punches
When your attention goes to the technology not the people using the technology = watch out ~ A5 #tchatCASUDI
A5 focus on increasing connection and meaning reagardless of the tool or medium – high tech can be high touch too #tchatSusan Mazza
A5.w/o tech i’d feel like i was on an island- we even have contests (this week will be pumpkin carving)-we post pics on internal site #tchatAshley Lauren Perez< /div>

a5. Organizations will have to create culture and space for employees to fail and learn with customers in real-time #tchatMichael Clark
A5 Technology keeps people networked even across great distances but nothing beats eye to eye think tanking…which engagement needs #tchatEnzo Guardino
A5: a) Transparency b) Transparency ~ Careful technology is a loaded weapon #TChatSean Charles
A5 Technology allows employees near and far to connect. Downfall – focus can be lost when face-to-face due to multi-tasking. #tchatAmy Do
a5. How to effectively engage real-time via teach cannot be taught in an online course, manual or book. #tchatMichael Clark
A5: Tech should not be a place where ideas grow until leaders weigh in & brainstorming dies #tchatAlli Polin
a5. Organizations must train employees how to successfully engage customers real-time, a tremendous challenge. #tchatMichael Clark
A5. We need to use both technology and relationship building side by side to engage. #tchatTerri Klass
A5. Then there’s the ‘Engagement survey’ – can technology, data analysis make it more valuable; impactful to engagement initiatives? #TchatJane Watson
a5. Engaging via tech is a subtle art that is difficult for even the best communicators. #tchatMichael Clark
A5: My org is HUGE! But employees use Yammer to share stories, crowd source solutions – connecting like that using tech is amazing. #tchatTL Frasqueri-Molina
A5. tech helps my company communicate/stay engaged/be involved since most of us work from remote locations #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
A5 TECH Helps w scope & speed (tools) of comm & collab BUT does not replace IRL ~ if U think it does = HURT #tchatCASUDI
#tchat A5 some will use it a a vehicle to learn and produce. Someone very shy may find it easier to engage through technology but can’t hideSage Bramhall
A5: Low tech works miracles too. Remember the handshake and press the flesh. #TChatTom Bolt
A5 There are some great platforms that help facilitate, profile sharing & team building out there. (Jostle) #TChatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A5. tech can present engagement opporunities in a non-threatening way, but can also be impersonal #tchatGuy Davis
A5: Real-time collaboration & building on ideas enhances engagement through tech or not #tchatAlli Polin
a5. People face tremendous challenges communicating IRL, much less engaging via tech #tchatMichael Clark
A5: Technology can be a gr8 (tool)
A5 Used well it can connect, support knowledge sharing, collaboration. Used poorly, it can further insulate employees from each other #TchatJane Watson
A5: Tech offers tools—they only build #engagement as much as leaders/empls are willing to use them to connect, share info & listen. #TChatShawna Kelly
A5: Technology is merely a vehicle to serve our communication, it’s the technology that engages, it’s the people who use it #tchatJen Olney
A5 Excellent online support and capability can be more engaging than a poor supervisor. #TChatIan Welsh
A5: #Technology can bridge time zones, cultures, generations… #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
A5: Correct application of technology enhances engagement. Technology for technology’s sake misses the purpose. #TChatTom Bolt
a5. What happens in tech, stays in tech, visible forever. #tchatMichael Clark
A5: If used incorrectly, it could hurt it, but generally speaking I think it’s a great tool to keep everyone involved and connected #tchatJoshua Barger
A5. Technology can open up a world of information and people to each of us. It can be amazing! #tchatTerri Klass
A5: Technology is not the message. It is the vehicle to deliver the message. #TChatTom Bolt
A5 Technology can greatly facilitate engagement by giving employees the best equipment and trust in usage. #TChatIan Welsh
Engage this picture: Post #TChat Sunset, Mission Beach, San Diego, CA http://pic.twitter.com/C2MW4T69Michael Clark

Employer and Personal Brands Tango: #TChat Preview

Companies spend a huge chunk of time, marketing investment and human capital in building a brand. For people building personal brands the investment ratios might be different, but for both employer and individual, brand is an asset, a form of intellectual capital. In the HR, talent management and leadership realm we often are first to see fault lines emerging between employers and employees, and what’s becoming apparent is the possibility for conflict between employer and personal brands.

Before it happens — before employers feel cheated by employees building personal brands on the clock, before employers lose followers to employees who feel their brand is more important than the company’s, and before employees feel coerced into the role of brand advocate — it’s time to have an adult discussion about how to create an environment where employer and personal brands can coexist and complement each other.

This week, the TalentCulture community will explore the boundaries separating and areas of overlap between employer and personal brands. We’ll review the essence of employer brand and propose best–practices for promoting and protecting employer brands. As well, we’ll look at how technology has changed the landscape for employee and employer brands alike.

I often don’t think it’s hard to determine when employer brand trumps personal brand, but for some it’s an open question, so we’ll add that to the discussion. My goal is to unearth insight into how personal and employer brands can coexist to mutual benefit. It’s possible, too, that a toxic workplace may be revealed by employees active in social media, so we’ll discuss strategies for identifying bad vibes and containing the damage (and learning from the experience.)

Let’s build our brands! It’s fun.

Here are this week’s questions for the #TChat forum:

Q1: What is the essence of an employer brand?

Q2: How have innovations in technologies altered employees’ relationships with their employers’ brands?

Q3: Which needs the other more, employee personal brands or the employer brand? Why?

Q4: What does it look like when employers’ brands exist dynamically & positively with employees’ personal brands?

Q5: How can leadership right an employer brand when employees’ personal brands reveal a toxic workplace culture?

Susan Strayer, SPHR (@SusanStrayer), will be our guest moderator this week. That’s appropriate and timely: At ERE Expo 2012 Fall, Susan will deliver a presentation on how employees’ personal brands can strengthen the employer brand. Founder of Exaqueo, where she helps start-up and high-growth organizations sort through their employer brands and talent strategies, Susan is a top 100 influencer in HR.

We’re happy and honored to have Susan leading the #TChat tweets on Wednesday, Aug. 29, from 7-8pm ET (6-7pm CT, 4-5pm PT, or wherever you are), to talk shop with us about employer brands and personal brands doing the tango.

Look for all of us, on the #TChat stream: yours truly (@MeghanMBiro) and Kevin W. Grossman (@KevinWGrossman), as well as Sean Charles (@SocialMediaSean), Salima Nathoo (@SocialSalima) and Brent Skinner (@BrentSkinner). We can’t wait for your tweets.

Image Credit: gmarcos1 on Flickr

Demand for Great Leadership Exceeds Supply: #TChat Recap

I’m not going to throw you any softballs. We did enough of that in last night’s #TChat.

Instead, I’m going to throw the next pitch really fast – the money ball – straight down the middle. C’mon, let’s see you swing. I want to see you knock it out of the park.

Because for the most part, we’re not knocking it out. My hope has always been that future leadership leads us out of our corrupt economic quagmire and into new world of ethical capitalism.

I’m also still hopeful about my fellow brothers and sisters today, even when time and again our mindful presence fails us. Like in today’s business and politics.

What about personal leadership today? What about us?

Polarized incivility and corruption are celebrated by the fringe and given the mainstream spotlight – for business, politics and pleasure.

But the radical center in many of us worldwide is rising up. We’re demanding better leadership; we’re learning to lead ourselves out of this quagmire.

No business school or political party or leadership program or religious movement has done that to date.

This, from a recent The Economist article, The new middle classes rise up:

This focus on corruption suggests that, at the moment, middle-class activism is a protest movement rather than a political force in the broader sense. It is an attempt to reform the government, not replace it. But that could change. In most middle-income countries, corruption is more than just a matter of criminality; it is also the product of an old way of doing politics, one that is unaccountable, untransparent and undemocratic.

Great leaders don’t give in to destructive impulses. They may dabble in the dark arts, but we forgive when it’s for the greater good. We are human. We are fallible.

We are leaders, each unto ourselves

But we have to be personally responsible, to own our every decision and its ensuing consequence. All leadership sparks start with self, the true fiery heart of inspired innovation.

Fanning the flames won’t mean that everyone catches fire, and I don’t disparage tough business leadership and those who succeed while others struggle to feed their families with no job prospects in sight.

I do empathize, though. Empathy is a leadership quality still too often bullied and laughed at. But it’s experience by failure and emotional intelligence that fights back with the insidious subtlety of a dry-witted comic.

Who’s laughing with you, not at you.

Today, the demand for great leadership exceeds the supply. The good news? Most of us are willing to transform the economic status quo.

Read Matt Charney’s precap here and here were the questions from last night:

  • Q1: What role do leaders play in driving innovation? Collaboration?
  • Q2: What makes someone a “leader?” Is this a matter of role/responsibility or perception?
  • Q3: Which matters most for leaders: education, experience or emotional intelligence?
  • Q4: What can organizations do better to hire and develop future leaders?
  • Q5: What role does social media and technology play in determining leadership efficacy?
  • Q6: How is leadership evolving, if at all? What does the future of leadership look like in 5 years? 10?

The #TChat Twitter chat and #TChat Radio are created and hosted by @MeghanMBiro @KevinWGrossman and powered by our friends and partners @TalentCulture @Monster_WORKS @MonsterCareers @HRmarketer and of course @Focus.

When Employers Aren't Our Biggest Fan: #TChat Recap

If you’re supposed to be my number 1 fan, then why do you treat me like a dirty bird?

Sometimes being on the job is just plain “Misery”. Maybe you’ve read the Stephen King novel or watched the movie starring Kathy Bates and James Caan, but if not the story is about a fan (fanatic) who holds captive the object of her obsession, the writer who keeps her entertained with his romantic novels — until he no longer does.

Back to being on the miserable job. Back in the mid 1990’s I worked at a university and had a boss who had a boss who made us both miserable. That combined with limited resources to do our jobs, and the fact that I managed a group of 50+ student employees in a condemned building on campus, and the fact that one of my colleagues who worked in the same building invaded and poked holes in my personal space daily, became unbearable.

My boss and I told each other that when the work day ended and the crying began, then it was time to leave. (Which is a lot less painful than being hobbled.)

It was time to leave. For both of us. First me and then him within the year.

Fast forward to today, two downturns into the 21st century with misery everywhere. According to Matt Charney‘s @Monster_WORKS pre-TChat write up:

The upcoming seismic spike in employee turnover will look different than any we’ve seen in the past. A recent Monster.com survey showed that fully 82% of fully employed workers have updated their resumes in the past 6 months, and a whopping 96% of employees with tenures of over 5 years are openly exploring opportunities.

Now flip that on its head and read this from recent Accenture survey:

Only about two of five (43 percent) professionals are satisfied with their jobs; however, 70 percent plan to stay with their current employers, according toReinvent Opportunity: Looking Through a New Lens, a survey of 3,400 professionals in 29 countries by the New York-based global management consulting and technology services company.

And then there’s a recent study by Harris Interactive and Plateau Systems that finds:

…Nearly three-quarters (74 percent) of workers would consider a new career opportunity if approached — but they aren’t actively looking for new jobs.

Both of these were from a recent HRE online article titled Staying Put that I recommend you read as well as Matt’s highlighted Monster Thinking reads.

But wait, does all this misery make for upwards of 90% of the current workforce passively active or actively passive?

Sure, I understand how fluid these numbers can be and of course what I’m feeling changes how the world appears. But employers obviously haven’t been making many of us feeling any better, although they’re not there to make us feel better. They’re there to make make stuff and sell stuff and hopefully keep their employees “engaged” as much as possible along the way so they stay to make stuff and sell stuff. Plus, engagement is just a buzzword for, “You like what you do? Let me make sure I take care of you for that.” Then there’s, “You don’t like what you do? Did I ever tell you I’m your number 1 fan?”

Employers should communicate with their employees much more regularly beyond the annual perform-dance review. They should talk to them about the business, where it’s at and where it’s going. Transparency and inclusivity lead to ownership, intrinsic rewards and a more productive and happy workday.

Unfortunately change is always painfully glacial for many of us. Even with exciting technological advances changing the landscape of how we work and how we manage the workforce — mobile, social, collaboration — we’re still way on the front end of mainstream with many of us kicking and screaming along the way doing way too much with way less support.

We don’t live in the 1950′s. The US isn’t the only superpower economy fueling booms (and busts) and creating fairly stable (yet volatile) middle class job markets. The fact that the contingent workforce does continue to increase in the wake of high unemployment and uncertain markets tells me that we’re never going back. The full-time job with benefits and a pension and a secure retirement has fast become a retro shadow.

This is the new age of individual as startup and business owner — our personal businesses. Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter said it best last night: “We’re just looking for fair compensation, fair personal treatment and respect, and not getting sick to our stomachs every morning.”

Oh, and a little work we enjoy. Being happy never hurts.

Amen.  As I’m sure you’ve gathered, last night’s theme was “Should I Stay Or Should I Go? Workplace Culture Factors to Consider Before Leaving Your Job.” You can see our reach from last night here and the questions are here:

  • Q1: Almost 90% of workers report being “open” to looking for new jobs. Why is this number so high?
  • Q2: How can employers take advantage of these trends to recruit and hire top talent?
  • Q3: What factors should employees consider when looking for a new job opportunity?
  • Q4: What can business leaders do to improve retention  rates and morale among top talent?
  • Q5: What’s the difference between an active and a passive candidate, if any?  Does it matter?
  • Q6: What are the most significant factors employees look at when deciding to stay or leave?
  • Q7: What are some ways employers and companies can help turn the tide?  Or is it too late?

Thank you again for participating in #TChat. Next week’s topic will be: “Am I A Temp, A Consultant, An Entrepreneur or a Small Business?  The Changing Identities of Today’s Workforce.” Yours truly will be moderating.

Until then, Happy Working from all of us here at TalentCulture.

Taking Over the World With Social, Mobile & Video Rock Stars

Yes, we want to take over the world.  Our monster end-of-year #TChat show about how social, mobile and video as rock stars impact workplace culture and predictions for 2011 was a rousing success.

Over 1,500 smarty pants tweets in the hour alone.  A hat tip and a thank you to all of you who did.

Top Contributors included:

  1. @talentculture – 315
  2. @meghanmbiro – 147
  3. @KevinWGrossman – 120
  4. @LevyRecruits – 73
  5. @dawnrasmussen – 67
  6. @jillianwalker – 64
  7. @tedcoine – 57
  8. @DrJanice – 53
  9. @IanMondrow – 50
  10. @EmilieMeck – 47

We referenced social, mobile and video as “rock stars” — even though we meant they are figurative rock stars and wanted to discuss their impact on workplace culture.

But some of the discussion morphed to literal social media rock stars in organizations today, and that’s okay.  In fact, much of the conversation was about how companies could better perform by allowing social to permeate.

And video and mobile are the two dots they’re connected to with dotted lines to us all…

Companies that don’t allow social media are killing their brand ambassadors.

Amen to that.

Here were some of everyone’s 2011 Predictions:

  • Mobile/virtual workforce on the rise. Video conferencing and coworking are where it’s at in 2011.
  • Companies will wake up and develop more inclusive SM policies at work.
  • HR will have to ROCK in 2011 if it wants to remain relevant. It will and the gap between SM and practitioner will shrink.
  • I am expecting that Role-Based Assessment will rock and roll in 2011.
  • Google to buy FB. FB to be Google. Googling your employees now unravels their whole life & danger zone commences.
  • Closer joining up of social networks. less engagment in channels. More use of 3rd party apps.
  • Lines moving between trad. old school ‘work’ continue to get erased as more people stay connected.
  • Companies are going to go to their legal dpt to define ‘privacy’ as lines between work / play get blurred.
  • Increased buy-in & participation from corp. leaders to join the conversation (social media).
  • Traditional workplaces will continue to un-teether and ppl will have to find new creative ways to connect via SM. Hello cloud!
  • More tools will become available to consolidate our SM.
  • Global concerns about privacy will slow personal SMV growth as companies trip over themselves to push out more “relevant” content.
  • Companies incorporate multimedia interviews in their hiring strategy!
  • In 2011 LinkedIn will reveal more strategies that require people to purchase premium memberships.
  • SM for the team – coming soon, because first you have to measure networking quality!

Meghan added at the end:

“My 2010 prediction held true. Workplace Brands = An intricate collection of Personal Brands :-) So much more to talk about!”

So let’s do that next time on Tuesday, January 4, 2011, from 8-9 p.m. ET.  We’re going to continue workplace culture predictions for 2011 and talk more about what they mean!

#TChat wouldn’t be what it was without all of you, so thank you again!  Happiest of Holidays to you all!

The 'Whys' for Gen Y: Workplace Culture Considerations

Today’s young professionals want different things than previous generations before them. Organizations are learning they need to adapt in order to attract these talented Millennials to their workplaces. What does Gen Y seek in an ideal workplace culture?

Flexibility

Gen Y values a high starting salary and financial security, but they also value flexibility in their work schedule and benefits. According to statistics, about 85% of Gen Y members want to spend 30-70% of their time working from home. In order to attract top talent from Generation Y, an organization’s workplace must provide some degree of flexibility.

Mentorship

Young professionals need someone to help guide them through their first years as entry-level professionals. When choosing an ideal workplace, their number one request was to work with a manager they could respect and learn from. Not sure where to start? Read my previous post about how to create and sustain a mentorship program.

Professional Tevelopment

Members of Generation Y thrive on ongoing learning and professional development opportunities. They typically are already thinking beyond their current role and realize they need con

State-of-the-Art Technology

According to statistics, Millennials rank working with state-of-the-art technology number six on their list of ideal workplace environment. Because young professionals grew up in the age of quickly evolving technology and trends, they expect the same in their place of work.

A Challenge

Although many people peg Gen Y as “job hoppers,” they often leave their jobs because they’re simply bored. Provide a challenge for them in the workplace by giving them more responsibility or the lead on a new project to keep them interested in their work.

Opportunity for Advancement

Show Gen Y employees they’ll have more than just a job if they work for you—they’ll have the opportunity to have increased responsibility, gain new skills and make more money if they stick around.

For more on what Gen Y expects in a workplace, check out this infographic loaded with statistics here.