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Photo: Drew Beamer

New Research Indicates Desire for Recognition, Feedback

In the past several months, many companies have modified their performance programs. From streamlining their review processes to running more frequent pulse surveys, organizations around the world are seeking to make changes that will ultimately boost employee performance and productivity.

Our company, Reflektive, sought to measure these changes with a performance management survey. In June we reached out to 445 HR professionals and business leaders, and 622 employees, to understand the current state of their performance programs. We compared these results to a similar survey we ran in 2018. Our 2020 Performance Management Benchmark Report uncovered meaningful performance management trends over the past two years, as well as insights into the current state of work.

Formal Processes of Performance Management Consistent Since 2018

A surprising observation was that the formal processes of performance management have not changed significantly over the last two years. Nearly half of reviews are run annually or less frequently. Forty-six percent of respondents use descriptive performance ratings, such as “meets expectations.” 

People Analytics Present Big Opportunity

The survey also found that only 50% of HR and business leaders are using people analytics to predict performance and turnover. What’s interesting is that most leaders believe that people analytics has become more important, however they’re still not utilizing this technology to inform strategic people decisions. This gap can really impact workforce planning, as organizations struggle to fill needs when employees depart.

Employees Desire More Communication and Transparency from Companies

The employee survey results revealed that workers seek more communication to stay informed and engaged at work. Nearly half of respondents desire more consistent communication from leadership, and 37% said more consistent communication was needed from colleagues. 

In a similar vein, we found that employees sought more transparency from their employers. Only 19% of employees believed that their organization was transparent about upward mobility. Twenty-one percent said their company was communicative about salary freezes, and the same percentage said that their org was transparent about potential pay cuts. Employees are cognizant of the pandemic’s economic toll, and would like their companies to be honest with them about the business impact.

Employees Seek More Feedback and Coaching for their Growth

Another interesting insight we uncovered was that employees want more from their performance programs. Specifically, they’re looking for increased coaching, dialogue and recognition from their managers. Since 2018, there’s been a 3.2X increase in the percentage of employees that desire recognition. We also observed a nearly 90% increase in the percentage of employees that desire formal feedback conversations monthly or more frequently.

A performance bright spot was the manager-employee relationship. Over 80% of employees surveyed said that they are having 1:1s with their managers. Additionally, 80% said that these meetings were productive. This data was really uplifting to me, since driving alignment and communication can be tricky when everyone is working remotely.

However, we did identify a major communication gap: only 20% of employees reported that they receive weekly feedback. So it appears that managers and employees are talking regularly about ongoing work and projects, but employees still aren’t receiving the coaching that they desire. This represents a huge opportunity for managers — they can benefit from training on how to ask important questions, and how to provide valuable feedback on a more regular basis. Performance management technology — including feedback prompts and 1:1 tools — can help drive productive coaching conversations too.

Getting Feedback Remains Challenging for Employees

One interesting discrepancy between leaders and employees was sentiment around initiating feedback conversations. Only 14% of HR professionals and business leaders felt that employees weren’t empowered to initiate feedback conversations. However, 30% of employees — or over 2X the percentage of leaders — felt that they weren’t empowered to request feedback. This discrepancy indicates that HR teams and leaders are overestimating employee comfort with feedback processes. Employee training on giving and receiving feedback, and an easy-to-use feedback tool, can help fill this gap.

Executives and Employees Remain Optimistic for the Future

While sentiment and outlooks are continuously evolving in 2020, both executives and employees remain optimistic about the future. Specifically, executives anticipate more investment in technology (35% of respondents) and more efforts to boost engagement and retain employees (29% of respondents). 

Employees anticipate that six months from now, it will be business as usual (34% of respondents). Additionally, 26% expect to have learned new skills, and 25% believe they’ll feel proud of their accomplishments. Despite the many headwinds that they’re facing, employees feel that they will come out of 2020 stronger and more prepared for the future.

As employees, HR teams, and executives navigate the ever-changing environment, agility and resilience will be crucial. The ability to work productively in different environments, and collaborate cross-functionally, will be highly valued. Companies that maintain engaged and productive workforces will be the success stories of 2020.

This post is sponsored by Reflektive.

How to Make Every Employee Feel Recognized

Do your employees feel recognized for their work?

A recent survey revealed 74 percent of employees plan to switch jobs in 2018 and 44 percent cited lack of recognition and engagement as the reason. That’s a bummer, and it’s something that we can fix.

There are a lot of opportunities in the work day to recognize employees and improve employee engagement. Let’s think through one best practice followed by organizations with engaged teams: Put your employees front and center.

Consider Everyone Who Should Be Recognized

The Individual

Don’t just address your workforce as an assembly of names. Personalize your recognition for each individual’s interests, concerns, goals and life. A rewards and recognition program that offers customizable portals and a wide range of different exchanges is a built-in way to acknowledge that recognition is personal.

Small Teams

Small teams are like families with enormous influence over the broader work culture. Your rewards and recognition platform should offer ways for them to recognize each other, whether though peer-to-peer recognition or team leaders recognizing the broader team. Continuous recognition should be encouraged and no one should be left out. Whether an employee works in your office or remotely, it’s important to recognize every individual for a job well done.

Gig and Freelance Workers

Given the rising percentage of freelancers, contractors, and other non-employee workers in the talent ecosystem, a rewards and recognition system should also provide you with the option of including every type of worker. Extending recognition to outside the organizational walls brings employees together, increases engagement, and strengthens the workforce community.

Make Employee Recognition a Priority

Even if you’re making plans to recognize all of the groups above, you can run into blind spots and inconsistencies that will derail your employee recognition program.

Here’s an example we saw recently: We were working with an organization’s HR department that had left rewards up to the discretion of managers. And those managers had very different notions of what recognition and rewards meant. There was no centralized criteria about what warranted praise or recognition. The performance data wasn’t comprehensive, which led managers to overlook certain performers because their contributions weren’t included in the overall data set.

The company decided to make the shift to an automated recognition and engagement platform that could create a lot more data but also incorporate every employee. The new platform created a matrix based on the entire workforce, then broke it down into departments, hubs and teams. It even created an automatic calendar for periodic recognition and feedback.

The most fascinating discovery was the immense impact recognition had on the lackluster and less-than-visible performers. When the light was finally shining on them, they all started to bloom, and performance, productivity and all the other KPIs began to rise.

Since the implementation of the company’s new recognition and engagement program, employees have been staying in their jobs longer, requesting less internal moves to other departments, and the managers themselves are far more involved in the recognition process.

Rule of thumb: Validate every single employee and make them all feel like they’re important to your organization through frequent recognition.

Want to learn more about how to effectively recognize employees? Join us for our webinar, 7 Ways Rewards and Recognition Connect Engagement and Business Goals, on March 15, 2018 at 1pm Eastern. Register here.

This post is sponsored by Achievers.

5 Ways to Earn Trust: The Ultimate Competitive Advantage

Are you looking for that leadership silver bullet that will propel you past the competition? You can take public speaking courses and enroll in an MBA program or you can attempt the single easiest feat for which an individual can strive, trustworthiness.

Leadership is built on one core concept—trust. Without it, you can forgo every other attribute espoused by management experts. Confidence without trust is an egomaniac. Charisma without trust is a charlatan. And vision without trust is a hypocrite. This was supported by a meta-analysis study from leading trust researcher and Georgetown University professor Daniel McAllister.

Published in the Academy of Management Journal, McAllister concluded that leaders viewed as trustworthy generate a culture where team members:

  • display greater innovation, agility, and responsiveness to changing conditions;
  • take risks because they believe they will not be taken advantage of;
  • do not expend needless time, effort, and resources on self preservation; and
  • go above and beyond to exhibit higher performing customer service, brand loyalty, and problem solving.

This leads to a competitive advantage through significantly higher commitment, satisfaction, retention, and performance. Similarly, research from the Ken Blanchard Companies found a strong correlation between trust and the behaviors associated with highly productive employees—discretionary effort, willingness to endorse the organization, performance, and a desire to be a “good organizational citizen.”

“Trust is the glue of life. It’s the most essential ingredient in effective communication. It’s the foundational principle that holds all relationships.”—Stephen Covey

Before you get insulted that I’m explaining something as elementary as the benefits of trust, have you heard of the Edelman Trust Barometer? The ETB has surveyed tens of thousands of people across dozens of countries about their level of trust in business, media, government, and nongovernmental organizations. In its 17th year, this is the first time the study found a decline in trust across all four institutions in all 28 countries surveyed.

For leaders, one of the more disturbing findings of the ETB is the shocking lack of confidence in leadership—63% of participants said corporate CEOs are either not at all or somewhat credible. That means only 37% maintained the credibility of CEOs, a 12-point drop from last year, and this is consistent around the world. CEOs are more trusted than government leaders (29%), but that’s setting a pretty low bar. Plus, with this “trust void,” only 52% said they trust business to do what is right.

So if trust is important and society is not feeling it, what can we do? Good news: you can (re)build trust. Here are five techniques to consider:

  1. Recognition, Recognition, Recognition. To increases trust between leaders and employees, nothing does it faster than acknowledging their achievements. It indicates you are paying attention and reinforces positive behaviors.
  2. Show Compassion. Did I say recognition is the fasted way to build trust? It won’t mean anything if you don’t already have a foundation of respect. Just try influencing someone who doesn’t respect you; see how engaged they are in your ideas. Treat your team like real-life people—listen to their ideas, care about their feelings, and empathize with their concerns.
  3. Keep to Your Word. You can’t build trust without following through on promises. Your team needs to believe that what you say is sincere, so follow through on commitments.
  4. Don’t Hide Your Humanity. Being human means showing your imperfections. Your ability to discuss your mistakes and share what you have learned from it makes you more relatable. No one is concerned with transparency for the good stuff; they need you to fess up to faults, so show your vulnerable side.
  5. Smile. If you don’t want to do something substantive to build your trust and would prefer a gimmick, consider a recent study published in Psychological Science where convicted murders with trustworthy faces received more lenient sentences then their peers with untrustworthy faces. The key, it seems, is that a gentle smile increases how trustworthy others perceive you. Keep in mind, that it needs to be gentle—too big can be seen as duplicitous or insincere, while too small may be seen as sarcastic or leering.

“I doubt that we can ever successfully impose values or attitudes or behaviors on our children certainly not by threat, guilt, or punishment. But I do believe they can be induced through relationships where parents and children are growing together. Such relationships are, I believe, build on trust, example, talk, and caring.”—Fred Rogers

We live in untrustworthy times, but that does not mean we have to lead in an untrustworthy manner. Generate a culture where honesty, transparency, and truth are the basis of your organization. This must start at the top of the organizational hierarchy with you. The team will trust you once you establish that you trust the team. It may take time, but as Seth Godin says, “Earn trust, earn trust, earn trust. Then you can worry about the rest.”

Entrepreneurship Is A Sweet Deal

The topic of entrepreneurship fascinates me. I often wonder what makes one person seek out entrepreneurial opportunities while others are content to be employees. I believe for some people the real and perceived risks of business ownership is too overwhelming for them to fathom. For others, there’s the immense commitment of time and resources and not to mention the financial implications. Being an entrepreneur or an employee both have their risks, it’s just a matter of which setting is more comfortable for you and where you see yourself fit.

I had the opportunity to discuss this topic with Elisabeth Vezzani, the Co-founder and CEO of Sugarwish. During an inspirational conversation we talked about the gratifying aspects, along with work-life balance issues entrepreneurs face as a business owner.

Ms. Vezzani, like many people, gained her experience from years in a corporate environment, specifically the staffing industry. During this time, she noticed a gap in the corporate gift market and created a company called Sugarwish, a startup that brings a revolutionary and sweet approach to gifting.

While working in the staffing industry, she sought out clever and unique gifting services to satisfy her own business needs and was disappointed with what was available. She recognized the need and from there decided on a type of gift that appeals to most people and envisioned how these gifts of recognition and thanks could be easy and fun to give and get. According to Elisabeth, “It all started as a conversation I was having with a friend about the lack of clever gifts that were available. I wanted to be able to give a gift that I would want to receive.”

Creating something to satisfy personal need then building it out to offer to others makes a lot of sense to me and one of the elements in the “secret sauce.” You have an idea. However, the change of moving from a position where a consistent source of income coupled with benefits and work that you enjoy doing, is still a big leap over to entrepreneurship.

Still desiring to know more about what differences someone experiences, I asked Elisabeth about the biggest adjustments she encounters between her corporate leadership position and self-employment. As with most entrepreneurs I’ve spoken with, her comments were not surprising. “The biggest difference with self-employment is that there’s no “off button.” states Elisabeth, “Much of it is my total love for Sugarwish… and my inability to stop thinking about what we can do better, or what we can do next. I want to be sure we are making Sugarwish all that it can be, and see it reach its full potential.” 

Ah, the “off button.” This comment makes something come to mind. I see entrepreneurship much as I view parenthood. A full-time, no holds barred, in-for-a-penny in-for-a-pound commitment. Another element of the “secret sauce.” But wait… this sounds like work-life imbalance more than symmetry. According to Elisabeth, “The balance is a little tricky, because that separation line is really blurred. Sugarwish fits into both my work and life categories. There is no “leaving it at the office”. There just can’t be. Keeping balance (and my sanity) requires a little more juggling, a little more understanding from family and friends… and a whole lot less sleeping.” There it is! There’s no separation from personal to business, because for an entrepreneur, their business is personal and so meaningful to them.

But surely, something is a driving force for people bitten by the entrepreneurial bug. They must get more out of the experience than what meets the eye. I can understand the self-satisfaction of “building” something and watching it grow, much like how people who love to garden enjoy seeing the fruits of their efforts develop. The gratification appears to run deep, but understanding the particulars of what is most impactful is probably personal. When I asked Elisabeth about her perspective on the gratification return on investment, she was adamant.

“One of the most gratifying aspects of my job is being able to watch Sugarwish continue to grow,” states Elisabeth, “and seeing it develop from a conversation, to an idea, to an initial website, to a thriving company has been unbelievably satisfying and inspiring. Another, is knowing that what we originally set out to do, specifically, delivering happiness, is working. We get to see how kind, thoughtful, generous and just generally awesome people are to each other… each and every day. All we hear is the good stuff and it never, ever gets old. It is literally the best job in the world.”

Question answered. I appreciate her impassioned response and obvious love of what she does for work. The most important element in the “secret sauce” revealed… a passion for what one does for work.

This desire for independent creativity and drive doesn’t need to be as an entrepreneur. Many people don’t build an empire, yet they still find happiness in what they do and look forward to doing it… every day. In Elisabeth’s case, she found her passion, built her business and set high bars to improve its performance to deliver more gratification, not only for herself, but for the people who interact with her company. For her entrepreneurship is a sweet deal with plenty of cowbell.

Image credit: StockSnap.io

Growth From Within: 7 Ways to Compete on Employee Talent

Does your business compete primarily on product and price?

That kind of old-school strategy may win you customers in the near term. However, competing on price or product is really just a race to the bottom.

Along the way, you’ll miss the broader opportunity — the chance to win a sustainable position of market strength.

Rethinking Business Strategy

Competing on price and product is finite. Eventually, either or both will stop yielding the desired business results. Then what can an organization do to kick-start momentum? There are several choices: 1) Retire the product, and replace it with a new one, or 2) Develop a new pricing strategy.

Either option can breathe new life into sales, right? Sure, but only for a limited time. Price and product can be duplicated or replicated. But there’s a source of competitive advantage that is nearly impossible to duplicate or replicate — and that is your workforce.

The Human Element

Does your organization compete by tapping into your people’s infinite, unique potential — their talents, skills, knowledge, experience, energy and creativity?

Access to any of these is boundless. These inherent strengths can be directed toward developing the next great product your customers need, or that pricing strategy that paves the way to increased market share. For example, think of Southwest and its refusal to charge customers for flying with luggage. Southwest was expected to earn over $200 million from baggage fees. Instead, the airline earned over $1 billion by choosing not to charge.

In the 21st century, people are celebrated as the cause for success that catapults organizations to the top. So, what does an organization do to shift its focus to compete on employee talent? Here are seven people-centric ways that signal organizational commitment that puts people first.

1) Identify how employees set your company apart

Spend time understanding how your employees’ skills, experiences, strengths can help advance your strategy. Focus on how they differentiate you from competitors. You should be able to answer this question with confidence: “How does our work environment let our employees’ talents thrive and grow?”

2) Invest in true workforce development

Don’t just send employees to compliance training. Involve them in training that elevates their skills and knowledge. At its best, workforce development makes it possible for employees to learn on-the-job skills that are crucial for their growth, and helps them contribute more effectively to your organization’s goals.

3) Adopt a customer-centric strategy

Look to build and deepen relationship with customers by transforming products, services and the customer experience. Align your employees to create solutions in each of these three areas. This work is meaningful: it helps employees see how their work ties to the bigger picture. Plus employees want to “be in” on important work.

4) Align your reward mechanisms

Are your reward programs considered irrelevant or worse? Employees should be recognized in ways that are meaningful to them. Rewards must be appropriate and timely. It’s important to motivate people with a mix of regular quick-wins and long-term incentives.

5) Modernize how and where work gets done

Mobile technology and remote work policies can transform how and where your employees get work done. They want the responsibility and flexibility to choose. It’s time to begin trusting your employees to be accountable for when, where and how they contribute. Mobile is not going away.

6) Reevaluate workload

Is there a healthy tension between employee workload and time to get it done? If expectations don’t support optimal performance, then your environment is likely creating distress. Excessive stress leads to anxiety, as people begin to feel undervalued and question their well-being. That’s the start of a long downward slide to disengagement and attrition.

7) Invest in learning employees strengths

Strengths-based leadership is about understanding the kind of work that energizes employees and leads them to perform at their peak. Just as your business must adjust to external factors, it is essential to reshuffle employee responsibilities on an ongoing basis. The more time employees spend in the zone of peak performance, the more likely you’ll see creative contributions from their efforts — and the more meaning you’ll bring to your organization’s value proposition.

Today’s topsy-turvy marketplace sometimes scares executives into behaving like cash-hoarders. But organizations that compete on employee talent position themselves to outwit, outplay, and outlast their competition.

What ideas would you add to this list? Please add your comments.

(Editor’s Note: This post is republished from SwitchandShift, with permission)

(Also Note: To discuss World of Work topics like this with the TalentCulture community, join our online #TChat Events each Wednesday, from 6:30-8pm ET. Everyone is welcome at events, or join our ongoing Twitter and G+ conversation anytime. Learn more…)

Image Credit: Pixabay

Does Your Workforce Feel The Love? #TChat Preview

(Editor’s Note: Are you looking for full highlights and resource links from this week’s events? See the #TChat Recap: “Employee Engagement: Say It Like You Mean It.“)

At one point or another, all of us have felt it.

You know what I mean. That sinking feeling in the pit of your stomach, when you suddenly realize someone you desperately want to pursue is simply just … not that into you.

Talk all you want about The 5 Love Languages or 50 Shades of Grey. No amount of self-help advice or passionate persuasion is likely to alter the destiny of that relationship.

Employer Love: Beyond Hearts and Flowers

Fortunately, it’s a different story for relationships between employers and employees. Even companies that haven’t connected with their workforce in meaningful ways can turn a lackluster situation around. But what’s the best approach? And is it really worth the effort?

That’s the topic the TalentCulture community is taking on this week at #TChat Events. And we’re fortunate to be welcoming two guests who understand the importance of developing solid employer/employee bonds: Chris Boyce, CEO at Virgin Pulse, and Kevin Herman, Director of Worksite Wellness at The Horton Group.

Sneak Peek

Both of these executives see tremendous potential in strengthening employee loyalty and engagement by focusing on lifestyle fundamentals — health and well-being. Last year, Chris explained in a Bloomberg broadcast interview why it’s wise to invest in workforce wellness, especially in the face of rising healthcare costs and reduced benefits. Watch now:

Recently, Chris contributed a TalentCulture post expanding on this concept. In “Workplace Wellness: The Story Starts With Healthy Culture,” he makes the business case for embracing next-generation wellness programs — not just to promote employee health, but to build a more resilient business, overall.

What do you think about the importance of wellness programs and other employee engagement strategies in demonstrating employer “love”? This topic affects all of us in the world of work, so we hope you’ll join the #TChat crowd this week and add your perspective to the conversation.

#TChat Events: Love Your Employees, They’ll Love You Back

#TChat Radio — Wed, Feb 12 — 6:30pmET / 3:30pmPT

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Tune-in to the #TChat Radio show

Our hosts, Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman talk with Chris Boyce and  Kevin Herman about why and how employers should demonstrate their commitment to workforce well-being. Tune-in LIVE online this Wednesday!

#TChat Twitter — Wed, Feb 12 7pmET / 4pmPT

Immediately following the radio show, Meghan, Kevin and our guests will move to the #TChat Twitter stream, where we’ll continue the discussion with the entire TalentCulture community, in a dynamic live chat.

Everyone with a Twitter account is invited to participate, as we address these 5 related questions:

Q1: Why does workforce recognition and engagement matter more than ever?
Q2: What are the best ways employers can demonstrate this kind of “love”?
Q3: Where have you seen engagement in action, for better or worse?
Q4: What technologies help nurture workforce engagement?
Q5: What kind of engagement metrics are relevant and useful?

Throughout the week, we’ll keep the discussion going on the #TChat Twitter feed, and on our new G+ community. So feel free to drop by anytime and share your questions, ideas and opinions.

We’ll see you on the stream!

What's Your Culture Tattoo? #TChat Recap

This Friday is tattoo day at work. Seriously. Tattoo day.

Everyone in our team is encouraged to display meaningful “appropriate” tattoos and the stories behind them. Any form is acceptable — permanent body art, decals, even hand-drawn creations. (Want to join the fun from a distance? Keep an eye on my Twitter stream for some inspired ink.)

The Art of Business Culture

Sure, this sounds a little hokey, like “Hawaiian shirt day.” But that’s the charm. It’s a simple, lighthearted way for us to interact, learn about one another, and gel as a team. What could be wrong with that?

The fact is — today’s crazy-busy world of work assaults us with constant change. It forces us to adapt, and adapt, and adapt again. But in rolling with all the changes, we can easily lose touch with people who are in the trenches with us. Injecting a little camaraderie into the day-to-day flow helps us create, reinforce and enhance our culture. For a company that has absorbed multiple acquisitions in the past two years, that can be a tough sell. But we’re making the case for continuous cultural connections, from the top down and the inside out.

And yes, as I said, along with the fun comes learning. We’re learning in general, and individually from one another. When fun is purposeful and persistent, it actually sticks.

According to Bersin by Deloitte 2014 workforce predictions:

“The traditional definition of a ‘highly engaged’ employee is one who delivers discretionary effort. What leads someone to deliver ‘discretionary effort?’ Our research shows it takes a working environment that is friendly, flexible, fulfilling and purposeful.”

Change Agents and Purposeful Symbols

This week’s #TChat Events guest, Fortune 500 executive leadership advisor, columnist, and author, Mike Myatt, would agree. On #TChat Radio, he noted that the most vibrant, valuable business cultures are built by design. They’re “very purposed and intentioned — creating a place where people actually want to come.”

(Editor’s Note: See full #TChat Event highlights and resource links at the end of this post.)

So, ask yourself these questions:

• How purposeful is your company culture? Even if you lead an organization of one, what are your intentions? Knowing that commitment to culture is integral to business success, are you clear with your employees (and yourself) that you’re here to stay and play? Don’t let your culture slip away through unintentional behavior. Choose to make it stick.

• What’s the shape of your cultural tattoo? I’m not an ink kind of person, but I don’t disparage those who are. In fact, throughout history, great leaders have bound tribes together with powerful visual symbols. In today’s organizations we may think of them as brands, but why shouldn’t meaningful symbols bind work tribes, as well? They do fulfill a primal need for identification and belonging. Does your employer brand accomplish that mission?

Hey — if you show me your tat, I’ll show you mine. On purpose.

For more insights on this topic, check out the highlights and resource links below from this week’s #TChat conversation. Thanks to everyone who contributed ideas and opinions! Your contributions helped bring the concept of “culture makeovers” to life!

#TChat Week-In-Review: Leading a Culture Makeover

SUN 1/5:

MikeMyatt (2)

Watch the #TChat sneak peek hangout now

#TChat Preview: TalentCulture Community Manager, Tim McDonald, framed the week’s topic in a post featuring a variety of related blog posts, and a “sneak peek” hangout video with guest, Mike Myatt, author of the new book, “Hacking Leadership.” Read the Preview now: “New Year, New Company Culture?

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Forbes.com Post: TalentCulture CEO, Meghan M. Biro suggested multiple ideas for leaders who need to drive cultural change. Read “5 Ways to Recognize Your Talent Culture.

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Listen now to the #TChat Radio replay

#TChat Radio: Host Meghan M. Biro, spoke with Mike Myatt about the role that leaders play in transforming organizational cultures — focusing on several real-world examples. Listen to the #TChat Radio replay…

#TChat Twitter: Immediately following the radio show, Meghan and Mike joined the TalentCulture community on the #TChat Twitter stream, as Nancy Rubin moderated a dynamic open conversation, centered on 5 related questions. See highlights in the Storify slideshow below:

#TChat Insights: New Year, New Company Culture?

[javascript src=”//storify.com/TalentCulture/new-year-new-company-culture.js?template=slideshow”]

Closing Notes & What’s Ahead

GRATITUDE: Thanks again to Mike Myatt for sharing your perspectives on how to drive meaningful organizational change. We value your time, your thoughtful ideas and your expertise!

NOTE TO BLOGGERS: Did this week’s events prompt you to write about organizational culture and change? We welcome your thoughts. Post a link on Twitter (include #TChat or @TalentCulture), or insert a comment below, and we’ll pass it along.

WHAT’S AHEAD: Our month of forward-thinking #TChat Events continues on Wednesday, January 15, when @appendTo CEO, Mike Hostetler, helps us take a closer look at remote workplaces — specifically, what makes virtual models work. More details to follow.

Meanwhile, the TalentCulture conversation continues daily on the #TChat Twitter stream, our LinkedIn discussion group. and elsewhere on social media. So join us anytime — don’t be shy.

We’ll see you on the stream!

Image Credit: Stock.xchng

What’s Your Culture Tattoo? #TChat Recap

This Friday is tattoo day at work. Seriously. Tattoo day.

Everyone in our team is encouraged to display meaningful “appropriate” tattoos and the stories behind them. Any form is acceptable — permanent body art, decals, even hand-drawn creations. (Want to join the fun from a distance? Keep an eye on my Twitter stream for some inspired ink.)

The Art of Business Culture

Sure, this sounds a little hokey, like “Hawaiian shirt day.” But that’s the charm. It’s a simple, lighthearted way for us to interact, learn about one another, and gel as a team. What could be wrong with that?

The fact is — today’s crazy-busy world of work assaults us with constant change. It forces us to adapt, and adapt, and adapt again. But in rolling with all the changes, we can easily lose touch with people who are in the trenches with us. Injecting a little camaraderie into the day-to-day flow helps us create, reinforce and enhance our culture. For a company that has absorbed multiple acquisitions in the past two years, that can be a tough sell. But we’re making the case for continuous cultural connections, from the top down and the inside out.

And yes, as I said, along with the fun comes learning. We’re learning in general, and individually from one another. When fun is purposeful and persistent, it actually sticks.

According to Bersin by Deloitte 2014 workforce predictions:

“The traditional definition of a ‘highly engaged’ employee is one who delivers discretionary effort. What leads someone to deliver ‘discretionary effort?’ Our research shows it takes a working environment that is friendly, flexible, fulfilling and purposeful.”

Change Agents and Purposeful Symbols

This week’s #TChat Events guest, Fortune 500 executive leadership advisor, columnist, and author, Mike Myatt, would agree. On #TChat Radio, he noted that the most vibrant, valuable business cultures are built by design. They’re “very purposed and intentioned — creating a place where people actually want to come.”

(Editor’s Note: See full #TChat Event highlights and resource links at the end of this post.)

So, ask yourself these questions:

• How purposeful is your company culture? Even if you lead an organization of one, what are your intentions? Knowing that commitment to culture is integral to business success, are you clear with your employees (and yourself) that you’re here to stay and play? Don’t let your culture slip away through unintentional behavior. Choose to make it stick.

• What’s the shape of your cultural tattoo? I’m not an ink kind of person, but I don’t disparage those who are. In fact, throughout history, great leaders have bound tribes together with powerful visual symbols. In today’s organizations we may think of them as brands, but why shouldn’t meaningful symbols bind work tribes, as well? They do fulfill a primal need for identification and belonging. Does your employer brand accomplish that mission?

Hey — if you show me your tat, I’ll show you mine. On purpose.

For more insights on this topic, check out the highlights and resource links below from this week’s #TChat conversation. Thanks to everyone who contributed ideas and opinions! Your contributions helped bring the concept of “culture makeovers” to life!

#TChat Week-In-Review: Leading a Culture Makeover

SUN 1/5:

MikeMyatt (2)

Watch the #TChat sneak peek hangout now

#TChat Preview: TalentCulture Community Manager, Tim McDonald, framed the week’s topic in a post featuring a variety of related blog posts, and a “sneak peek” hangout video with guest, Mike Myatt, author of the new book, “Hacking Leadership.” Read the Preview now: “New Year, New Company Culture?

MON 1/6:

Forbes.com Post: TalentCulture CEO, Meghan M. Biro suggested multiple ideas for leaders who need to drive cultural change. Read “5 Ways to Recognize Your Talent Culture.

WED 1/8:

TChatRadio_logo_020813

Listen now to the #TChat Radio replay

#TChat Radio: Host Meghan M. Biro, spoke with Mike Myatt about the role that leaders play in transforming organizational cultures — focusing on several real-world examples. Listen to the #TChat Radio replay…

#TChat Twitter: Immediately following the radio show, Meghan and Mike joined the TalentCulture community on the #TChat Twitter stream, as Nancy Rubin moderated a dynamic open conversation, centered on 5 related questions. See highlights in the Storify slideshow below:

#TChat Insights: New Year, New Company Culture?

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Closing Notes & What’s Ahead

GRATITUDE: Thanks again to Mike Myatt for sharing your perspectives on how to drive meaningful organizational change. We value your time, your thoughtful ideas and your expertise!

NOTE TO BLOGGERS: Did this week’s events prompt you to write about organizational culture and change? We welcome your thoughts. Post a link on Twitter (include #TChat or @TalentCulture), or insert a comment below, and we’ll pass it along.

WHAT’S AHEAD: Our month of forward-thinking #TChat Events continues on Wednesday, January 15, when @appendTo CEO, Mike Hostetler, helps us take a closer look at remote workplaces — specifically, what makes virtual models work. More details to follow.

Meanwhile, the TalentCulture conversation continues daily on the #TChat Twitter stream, our LinkedIn discussion group. and elsewhere on social media. So join us anytime — don’t be shy.

We’ll see you on the stream!

Image Credit: Stock.xchng

Employee Referral Programs: How To Expand Your Circle

Written by Ziv Eliraz, CEO, Zao

There’s a reason why employee referrals are touted as the #1 hiring source. Each referral is a credible thumbs-up from a trusted member of your organization, confirming that the candidate is qualified for the job and will fit-in with your culture. Plus, when tons of people are responding to your job postings, referrals can be an effective way to separate the good from the bad, while accelerating time-to-hire.

It’s all good. So, why not expand that model?

Traditionally, referral programs have been built around an organization’s internal network, with employees identifying likely prospects. However, smart companies understand that their external network is filled with potential sourcing allies — business partners, vendors, professional peers, college connections, even former employees. It just takes a different approach to get them on board.

Four ways to extend your referral program reach:

1) Incorporate Rewards

Relevant rewards can be a powerful incentive. Plus, they work. Research shows that when companies offered rewards to trusted members of their external network, 41% of referral hires came from those non-employees. As a result, referral hires were 69% higher than through employee channels, alone.

Tip:  Make sure the value of the reward is calibrated to the business result. For example, a token gift card or social recognition could be given to acknowledge a hot lead — while cash compensation would be more appropriate when a referral is interviewed or hired.

2) Go Mobile

Consider contractors and other virtual contributors members of your workforce. Although they may not be employees, they can still provide value through referrals. However, because many operate from remote locations, your referral program should be accessible on-the-go — through smartphones, tablets, or other mobile devices. This lets your external network easily refer candidates wherever and whenever the opportunity strikes.

Tip:  Create an employee referral app or a mobile-accessible portal that is tailored specifically for external network members. This helps them feel like they’re part of the program, and makes it convenient to participate.

3) Automate The Process
While your external network can make a significant contribution to your referral pipeline, recommending candidates is an added duty they must perform without immediate reinforcement. Try to make the referral process as quick and easy as possible by automating the process. New technologies can automatically compile jobs, sending relevant reminders to the correct people at the right time, and recommending appropriate next-step actions. Automation not only keeps the referral program continuously active, but also guides your external stakeholders in their role.

Tip:  Rolling “push” communication is a smart idea. For example, you can automatically share job updates every Wednesday at 3 p.m., or whenever your network is most active. That way, your program participants learn when to expect information. Also, it’s wise to personalize message content — sending relevant messages to the right people. This avoids frustration for participants, who would otherwise have to search for information they need.

4) Incorporate Game Dynamics

Gamification uses game-based strategy, learning and mechanics to increase engagement in non-game systems. While it may seem like an uncommon strategy, 70% of the world’s top 2,000 public companies will have integrated gamification into at least one business application by 2014. In this case, it can be a fun way to involve external parties in your referral process, using quick feedback, creating friendly competitive challenges and other methods that keep your participants engaged.

Tip:  A great way to introduce game dynamics is through a leaderboard or a point-based tracking system. Members of your network can see how they’re contributing to the overall referral process, and see how they compare with top performers. This not only creates a sense of friendly rivalry, but also offers ongoing feedback that helps remind participants that their recommendations are not being ignored.

Tap Into Your Full Sourcing Potential

Of course, employee-only referral programs aren’t a bad idea. However, at some point, there is a limit to how many people an individual employee knows directly. While your internal network can provide some excellent referrals, your external network can amp up the quality and diversity of potential hires. Although you may not think of external allies first, they can be a great referral resource because they understand your organization’s culture, they know your business needs, and they often have a vested interest in your success.

What do you think? Do you involve your external network in the employee referral process? What kind of results have you seen?

Ziv Eliraz-001 (About the Author: Ziv Eliraz is Founder and CEO of Zao, social employee referral platform. Connect with Ziv on LinkedIn and Zao on Twitter and Facebook.)

(Also Note: To discuss World of Work topics like this with others in the TalentCulture community, join our online #TChat Events every Wednesday, from 6:30-8pm ET. Everyone is welcome to participate; or join our ongoing Twitter conversation anytime. Learn more…)

Image Credit: Pixabay

Empowering Employees in 3D: Webinar with Virgin Pulse

When people go to work, they don’t leave their lives behind — so why do employers expect them to?

This kind of one-dimensional thinking is exactly what led us to the dismal workforce engagement levels we see today.

Fortunately, there are ways to turn this around. Research and real-world examples reveal that when employees are encouraged to develop in mind, body and spirit, they become more focused, productive and committed to their work. It sounds like common sense, but putting it into practice can be a challenge.

VirginWebinar (2)So, what’s the secret? How can business and HR leaders more fully engage employees through cultures that celebrate the “whole person”?

Learn from experts at a special webinar on Thursday, November 7, at 2pm ET/11 am PT:
“Total Quality of Life: A Roadmap for Employee Engagement.”

David Coppins, President, Virgin Pulse Client Services & Member Engagement, and Meghan M. Biro, CEO of TalentCulture will share insights to help you:

•  Build a compelling case for “total quality of life” initiatives;
•  Create a winning employee empowerment strategy;
•  Drive authentic engagement across the workforce.

Virgin-Pulse

Register for the webinar now

“Igniting employee passion and performance should be within every company’s reach.” Meghan says. “We’re thrilled to work side-by-side with Virgin Pulse in helping business leaders learn from one another about how to successfully transform their cultures. It’s all about changing lives for good — across the world of work.”

Throughout the webinar, attendees are invited to join members of the TalentCulture community on Twitter, as we share ideas and questions using the #TChat hashtag.

Don’t miss this dynamic informative event! Register now, and join us November 7th.

Participating Organizations

Learn more about Virgin Pulse, and follow @VirginPulse on Twitter.
Learn more about TalentCulture, and follow @TalentCulture on Twitter.

Where’s Your Inner HERO? Positivity at Work

The Business Value Of Positive Psychology

Most of us are familiar with the terms “economic capital” and “human capital” — two fundamentals of modern business. But what about the notion of “psychological capital,” and its role in driving individual and organizational performance?

Researchers have been studying the application of Positive Psychology in the workplace, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a positive mindset affects our attitudes toward work, as well as the subsequent outcomes. As Dr. Fred Luthans explains in the video at the end of this post, our “psychological capital” can, indeed, have a significant impact upon work and career.

Previously, I’ve discussed how the tenets of positive psychology hold great potential as a guide to help individuals and organizations elevate workplace happiness. Overall, the movement focuses on identifying and building on what is “right” with our work lives — emphasizing our strengths, celebrating smaller successes, expressing gratitude. Central to this theory is the mechanism that helps us build our “psychological resources,” and use this collected energy to digest and cope with our work lives.

Finding Your Workplace “HERO”

To provide a practical framework for this concept, researchers have developed what they aptly call the Psychological Capital (PsyCap) construct. It features various psychological resources (a.k.a. “HERO” resources) that are central to our work life experiences. We combine these resources in various ways to meet the challenges of our daily work lives.

What are HERO resources?

Hope: Belief in the ability to persevere toward goals and find methods to reach them
Efficacy: Confidence that one can put forth the effort to affect outcomes
Resilience: Ability to bounce back in the face of adversity or failure
Optimism: A generally positive view of work and the potential of success

Finding Your Workplace HERO

Notably, studies have established (Avey, Luthans, et al., 2011) a clear positive relationship between PsyCap and multiple desired workplace outcomes, including job satisfaction, organizational commitment and psychological well-being. Moreover, the construct correlates negatively with undesirable organizational behaviors, including cynicism, anxiety, stress, and the intention to resign.

If you’re an employer, you’re probably wondering if you can improve the strength of an employee’s HERO resources over time. On a promising note, PsyCap appears to be a “state like” quality that is open to change. This contrasts with traits that tend to be largely stable over time, such as the “Big 5” personality traits — extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness.

Assuming that psychological capital can be developed and strengthened over time, there are broad implications for key workplace behavior conventions, such as the nature of performance feedback, modes of learning and development, role design and leadership style.

Do you feel that focusing on PsyCap could enhance your work life or organizational culture? How would you apply this concept in your world of work?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTCU80iiaeM

(Editor’s Note: This article is adapted from a LinkedIn Influencer post, with permission.)

(Also Note: To discuss World of Work topics like this with others in the TalentCulture community, join our online #TChat Events every Wednesday, from 6:30-8pm ET. Everyone is welcome for events, or to join our ongoing Twitter conversation anytime. Learn more…)

Image Credit: CGArtiste (Superman is © DC Comics)

Where's Your Inner HERO? Positivity at Work

The Business Value Of Positive Psychology

Most of us are familiar with the terms “economic capital” and “human capital” — two fundamentals of modern business. But what about the notion of “psychological capital,” and its role in driving individual and organizational performance?

Researchers have been studying the application of Positive Psychology in the workplace, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a positive mindset affects our attitudes toward work, as well as the subsequent outcomes. As Dr. Fred Luthans explains in the video at the end of this post, our “psychological capital” can, indeed, have a significant impact upon work and career.

Previously, I’ve discussed how the tenets of positive psychology hold great potential as a guide to help individuals and organizations elevate workplace happiness. Overall, the movement focuses on identifying and building on what is “right” with our work lives — emphasizing our strengths, celebrating smaller successes, expressing gratitude. Central to this theory is the mechanism that helps us build our “psychological resources,” and use this collected energy to digest and cope with our work lives.

Finding Your Workplace “HERO”

To provide a practical framework for this concept, researchers have developed what they aptly call the Psychological Capital (PsyCap) construct. It features various psychological resources (a.k.a. “HERO” resources) that are central to our work life experiences. We combine these resources in various ways to meet the challenges of our daily work lives.

What are HERO resources?

Hope: Belief in the ability to persevere toward goals and find methods to reach them
Efficacy: Confidence that one can put forth the effort to affect outcomes
Resilience: Ability to bounce back in the face of adversity or failure
Optimism: A generally positive view of work and the potential of success

Finding Your Workplace HERO

Notably, studies have established (Avey, Luthans, et al., 2011) a clear positive relationship between PsyCap and multiple desired workplace outcomes, including job satisfaction, organizational commitment and psychological well-being. Moreover, the construct correlates negatively with undesirable organizational behaviors, including cynicism, anxiety, stress, and the intention to resign.

If you’re an employer, you’re probably wondering if you can improve the strength of an employee’s HERO resources over time. On a promising note, PsyCap appears to be a “state like” quality that is open to change. This contrasts with traits that tend to be largely stable over time, such as the “Big 5” personality traits — extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness.

Assuming that psychological capital can be developed and strengthened over time, there are broad implications for key workplace behavior conventions, such as the nature of performance feedback, modes of learning and development, role design and leadership style.

Do you feel that focusing on PsyCap could enhance your work life or organizational culture? How would you apply this concept in your world of work?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTCU80iiaeM

(Editor’s Note: This article is adapted from a LinkedIn Influencer post, with permission.)

(Also Note: To discuss World of Work topics like this with others in the TalentCulture community, join our online #TChat Events every Wednesday, from 6:30-8pm ET. Everyone is welcome for events, or to join our ongoing Twitter conversation anytime. Learn more…)

Image Credit: CGArtiste (Superman is © DC Comics)

Should Work Be Fun? Really? #TChat Preview

(Editor’s Note: Looking for a complete recap of this week’s events and resources? Read the #TChat Recap: Fun Times! Work, Games and Culture.)

Work and fun — do they fit together? Or should we save good times for vacation and weekends?

Traditionalists might say that work is serious business. However, one of the most creative and productive minds of the Industrial Age seemed to think otherwise:

“I never did a day’s work in my life; it was all fun.”
-Thomas Edison

Thomas Edison

Learn more about Thomas Edison

It’s impossible not to admire Edison’s enthusiasm. But these days, with global employee engagement stubbornly stuck at 30% or less, companies everywhere are looking for ways to inject more of that spirit into their organizational cultures.

That’s why the principles of gaming are gaining appeal as a way to improve workforce commitment, development and performance.

But how can we create environments where work is naturally more engaging and enjoyable, without losing sight of business objectives?

That’s the topic we’ll explore this week at #TChat Events, with two innovators in workplace culture development:

•  Dan Benoni, Co-Founder & Product Director at Officevibe, a social employee engagement platform
•  Mario Coculuzzi, Eastern Canada Regional Director at Microsoft.

Dan and I spoke briefly in a G+ Hangout, where he suggested that successful approaches don’t focus on the work, itself, but instead focus on three essential human factors:

Also to help us prepare for the discussion, TalentCulture CEO, Meghan M. Biro, wrote a related article at Forbes.com. Read “5 Fresh Trends to Fuse Fun and Work.”

This topic promises to be great fun — and helpful, too. So please plan to join us this week to share your ideas and opinions about why and how game-oriented tools and techniques make sense in the world of work.

#TChat Events: Should Work Be Fun, Really?

TChatRadio_logo_020813

Listen to the #TChat Radio show

#TChat Radio — Wed, Oct 23 — 6:30 pmET / 3:30 pmPT

Our hosts, Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman talk with Dan Benoni and Mario Coculuzzi about why and how “fun” can be an effective way to improve employee energy, drive and focus. Follow the action LIVE online this Tuesday afternoon!

#TChat Twitter — Wed, Oct 23 7pmET / 4pmPT

Immediately following the radio show, we’ll move this discussion to the #TChat Twitter stream for an open chat with the entire TalentCulture community. Everyone with a Twitter account is invited to participate, as we address these questions:

Q1: How often do you see healthy company cultures? Examples?
Q2: Why is engagement key to creating/maintaining a vibrant culture?
Q3: Can “fun” team challenges and other activities really help?
Q4: How can leaders improve employee well-being and retention?
Q5: How can HR drive adoption of recognition and engagement platforms?

Throughout the week, we’ll keep the discussion going on the #TChat Twitter feed and on our LinkedIn Discussion Group. So please join us share your questions, ideas and opinions.

We’ll see you on the stream!

Want To Build A Business? Lead With Trust

If you could define business success, what would it look like to you? Would you focus on market share? Growth rate? Revenue? Profitability? Or something else?

At young companies, conversations tend to revolve around how to raise seed funding, where to invest capital, and how to compensate key contributors. Often, it seems that our perception of business success (or failure) largely revolves around money.

While it is true that a well-run company requires appropriate funding and sound financial management, I would argue that there is something even more vital to the sustained growth of any venture. It’s not something you can buy or sell — nor does it come prepackaged on a shelf.

I’m talking about trust.

Broken Trust: Good Examples Of Bad Behavior

From the Enron debacle to the Madoff scandal, stories of insider trading and fraud have captured headlines far too frequently. Our nation is losing faith in corporate leaders, and there’s a growing demand for corporate accountability and transparency.

The only way to turn this around is for those at the top to take responsibility and lead by example. We must create open, transparent cultures that promote accountability, integrity and honesty.

The truth of the matter is that employees need to know what’s going on in order to feel connected with their work and perform at their highest level. Staff concerns about the stability and the health of the company are a distraction that can erode trust, inhibit productivity and have a negative impact on the bottom line.

Creating an environment of trust goes far beyond releasing quarterly reports. It requires a daily commitment to transparency that’s infused into all aspects of business operations, and reaches all levels of the organizational chart. Most importantly, it requires team coaching and open communication across all functions, with management that listens and responds to constructive criticism.

Trust Is The Cornerstone Of Culture

Leadership legend, Stephen M. R. Covey said:

“High trust is a dividend; when it goes up you’ll find that everything happens faster and cost goes down. It’s that predictable.”

Although trust can take a long time to build, once we have achieved a state of trust, we often take it for granted. But the fact of the matter is that trust is at the core of the daily work activities that collectively make up company culture. As Deborah Mills-Scofield explains in the Harvard Business Review:

“Trust trumps everything. And everything flows from trust — learning, credibility, accountability, a sense of purpose and a mission that makes ‘work’ bigger than oneself.”

When it comes to trust, the whole is bigger than the sum of its parts. For example, many startups have created cultures based around staff perks like a ‘no vacation policy’ vacation policy, providing employees with top-of-the line equipment, offering flexible hours, and letting staff work from home. While benefits like these may attract and retain top talent, there’s also a higher mission. Companies that offer these unique self-directed work options are sending employees a message that says, ‘I trust you, and I trust your judgment in using these privileges.”

Earlier this year, HubSpot released its long-awaited Culture Code – a presentation that summarizes the organization’s nine core beliefs. The document is remarkable because it emphasizes that trust is at the center of Hubspot’s organization. Rather than creating binders full of company policies, HubSpot has created a simple three-word policy for nearly everything: use. good. judgment. From social media activity, to travel expenses, to sick days, HubSpot understands that a healthy company starts with trust.

The Trust/Time Ratio

Of course, trust is a two-way street. Not only is it essential for employees to trust management, but leaders must trust their teams, and feel confident in their ability to move the company forward.

As Stephen M.R. Covey explains in his book, The Speed of Trust, trust is the great liberator of time and resources. It’s also an essential condition for growth. He notes that “when trust goes up, speed will also go up and cost will go down,” and that “when trust goes down, speed will go down and costs will go up.” Therefore, he concludes that the speed at which you can grow a business is directly proportionate to the time that you invest in creating trusting relationships.

Leading By Letting Go

One of the most important lessons I learned as a CEO was the importance of trusting your team. As the leader of any organization, large or small, your primary job is to communicate the vision; give your people the information, tools and resources to move toward it; and then get out of the way. This frees your staff to be as productive as possible, while allowing you to focus on your responsibility to drive the company forward, strategically.

The truth is plain and simple: if you’re a leader who wants to grow a company, you must have faith in your staff to get the job done – without you hovering around their desks. It is impossible to innovate while being bogged down in the daily minutia of your company. Trust allows you to remove yourself from the details and create necessary space to focus on long-term growth.

Trust is a natural human instinct, yet we tend to over-complicate it when we try to apply it to the business world. The best way to create a culture of trust is to begin by being open and honest with ourselves and those around us. By committing to being transparent in all our interactions, we will gradually create a culture of trust around us. And as trust grows, we should expect to see business results follow.

How do create and sustain trust within your organization? What results do you see?

(Editor’s Note: To discuss World of Work topics like this with others in the TalentCulture community, join our online #TChat events every Wednesday, from 6:30-8pm ET. Everyone is welcome. Learn more...)

Image Credit: Pixabay

Game On! Playing To Business Strengths #TChat Recap

This week, the TalentCulture community took a fascinating look at gamification in the workplace. And in my opinion, everyone earned badges and gold stars, as we shared collective knowledge at #TChat events.

Our two expert guests are masters at explaining the connection between business gamification and big data. These smart senior executives brought key concepts to life with practical ideas and real-world examples:

Guy Halfteck, Founder and CEO of Knack, a company that integrates games into the hiring process to help companies define desired talent characteristics and improve recruiting outcomes.

Mark Howorth, COO at Panavision, who previously served as Partner and Sr. Director of Global Recruiting at Bain & Company. He has seen the power of gamification at work, as three of his #TChat Twitter comments revealed:

(Editor’s Note: For full highlights from the #TChat Twitter event, see the Storify slideshow at the end of this post)

Gamification: What’s In A Name?

“Gamification” is a controversial term, but the concept it simple. It’s about employing game theory and mechanics in business environments to drive problem solving, boost workforce and customer engagement, capture better organizational insights, accelerate responsiveness, improve learning and increase ROI. Last year, Gartner predicted that by 2015, more than 50% of organizations that manage innovation processes will integrate gamification.

Gartner identified four ways that gamification drives engagement:

• Accelerated feedback cycles. In the real world, feedback loops are slow (annual performance appraisals) with long periods between milestones. Gamification increases the velocity of feedback loops to maintain engagement.

• Clear goals and rules of play. In the real world, where goals are fuzzy and rules selectively applied, gamification provides clear goals and well-defined rules of play to ensure players feel empowered to achieve.

• A compelling narrative. While real-world activities are rarely compelling, gamification builds a narrative that engages players to participate.

• Tasks that are challenging but achievable. While there is no shortage of challenges in the real world, they tend to be large and long-term. Gamification provides many short-term, achievable goals to sustain engagement.

Gamification: What Makes It Tick?

Gamification is serious business. As Accenture explained in a detailed report early this year, companies are striving to understand what makes games so appealing (a shared sense of purpose, challenge and reward). They are decoding gaming mechanisms (personalization, rankings and leaderboards), and applying these mechanics in imaginative ways across business functions. Accenture identified seven essential elements:

Status: Because gamers are motivated by recognition of others in their social circles, game-based business solutions must make it possible to enhance players’ reputations.

Milestones: Levels are everything in gaming, and enabling participants to perceive progress through incremental accomplishments is vital to sustaining interest.

Competition: This is a major motivator that maintains engagement.

Rankings: Visually displaying progress and rankings help participants benchmark their performance to their own goals and others’ performance. Rankings tap into natural human competitiveness, and motivate participants to continue, so they can improve their position.

Social connectedness: Successful gamification initiatives create a strong sense of community.

Immersion reality: With visually rich graphics and animation, digital environments can help immerse participants in their virtual reality.

Personalization: The ability to customize promotes a sense of control and ownership.

In their book, “For The Win: How Gamification Can Transform Your Business,” Wharton professor and gamification expert, Kevin Werbach and New York Law School professor Dan Hunter, take a deep dive into gamification.

In this informative video, they explain how gamification helps people “find the fun in the things you have to do.” They make it easy to understand gamification, with examples of successful companies that are applying these techniques, and advice to help organizations avoid common pitfalls. We hope you find this, along with the collected resource links and #TChat Twitter highlights slideshow below a helpful resource for game-based initiatives in which you may be involved!

#TChat Week-In-Review: Games + Big Data + Talent Management = Trifecta!

SUN 9/15:

GuyHalfteck

Watch the Hangout now

#TChat Preview: TalentCulture Community Manager Tim McDonald framed the topic in a post that featured a brief G+ Hangout videos with Guy Halfteck. Read the Preview:
“Games and Data and Talent — Oh My!”

MON 9/16:

Forbes.com Post: TalentCulture CEO, Meghan M. Biro outlined 5 compelling reasons for businesses to integrate gaming into workflows, learning and management processes. Read: “5 Ways Leaders Win At Gamification Technology.”

WED 9/18:

TChatRadio_logo_020813

Listen to the #TChat Radio show now

#TChat Radio: Our hosts, Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman talk with Guy Halfteck and Mark Howorth about how games are emerging as a highly effective, reliable way to select, recruit and retain employees. Listen to the radio show recording now!

#TChat Twitter: Immediately following the radio show, I joined Guy, Mark, Meghan, Kevin on the #TChat Twitter stream for a dynamic and enlightening discussion with the entire TalentCulture community. For highlights from the conversation, check the Storify slideshow below:

#TChat Highlights: Games People Play: Ultimate Way To Measure Talent?

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Closing Notes & What’s Ahead

GRATITUDE: Thanks again to Guy Halfteck and Mark Howorth for adding your voices to this week’s discussion. Your insights and passion for the business benefits of gaming strategies have captivated us all.

NOTE TO BLOGGERS: Did this week’s events prompt you to write about gamification? We’d love to share your thoughts. Post a link on Twitter (include #TChat or @TalentCulture), or insert a comment below, and we’ll pass it along.

WHAT’S AHEAD: Next week, we tackle another important “world of work” topic — Transparency vs. Privacy in the Workplace with HR/Employment lawyer, Mary E. Wright. So save the date (September 18) for another rockin #TChat double header. And keep an eye out for details in the next few days.

Meanwhile, the World of Work conversation continues! So join us on the #TChat Twitter stream, on our LinkedIn discussion group. or elsewhere on social media. The lights are always on here at TalentCulture, and your thoughts are always welcome.

See you on the stream!

Image Credit: Graeme Lawton via Flickr

How To Help Top Talent Thrive

Written by Mona Berberich

Back in college economics class, I discovered a common assumption about economies of scale — actually about returns to scale. In business, we assume that if we increase factors of input by a given amount, the output will increase by that much or more. This concept seems intuitive, and we rely on it to simplify the management process and maximize profits.

Recently however, while researching how companies treat their top talent, I’ve found that many organizations apply this “returns to scale” theory to their most valuable asset — their smartest, most creative people. In other words, leaders often think that, by doubling the number people with creative abilities, the organization will be at least twice as creative. But if innovation is the goal, this theory isn’t sufficient.

Finding More Of The Right Stuff

What really matters in this equation? It’s ultimately about organizational culture. When managers create an environment that inspires the brightest and most talented people to thrive to their fullest potential, that’s when business performance increases proportionately (or more).

That said, to foster a scalable creative culture, it’s important to understand the smartest and most creative among us. What motivates the top 2 to 5% of the workforce with genius in software design, molecular engineering, and other areas of specialized expertise? Better knowledge of this will lead to a more supportive environment for top talent.

Portrait Of An Innovation Star

I’m not saying that clever people are all alike, but they do follow similar paths and tend to share multiple characteristics. For example, unlike most of us, top contributors know what they’re worth. In today’s more mobile, global world, they have more opportunities. They know their value, and they expect employers to know it, too.

They also tend to share a single defining characteristic — they don’t want to be “managed.” This requirement can be quite a challenge for business leaders. Very talented individuals often are adept at accomplishing great things on their own. They tend to have no special bond with their employer, but they know how to behave to gain funding and support. On the other hand, they’re aware that their employer relies upon them. They generate the ideas that no one else brings to the table, and often they go the extra mile to breathe life into their vision.

Often high flyers demand organizational protection and ignore corporate hierarchy. Quite frankly, they despise titles and promotions, at least in the way that most people perceive those business conventions. Being part of an organization chart is often a thorn in their side. Meetings tend to be seen as waste of time — a by-product of bureaucracy. Bottom line: They prefer immunity from organizational activities because administration is what keeps them from doing what really matters — creating change.

The smartest people often have unconventional expectations. They’re likely to assume managers don’t understand what they are doing, but they want respect for what they do. They want managers to recognize their ideas, and reward them with access to corporate leadership, information and resources. They want freedom to explore new territory, and permission to fail, because failure ultimately can lead to better outcomes. The fact is, they tend not to speak the same language as others in an organization, and often they don’t even want a public voice in the organization’s discussions. What to do? Here are several suggestions…

How Can Your Culture Support Extraordinary Creativity?

1) Be a Guardian

The most talented contributors don’t need a boss, they need a guardian — a sponsor who opens doors on their behalf. Focus on helping to facilitate their work. Give them appropriate guidelines, but eliminate rigid rules.

2) Offer Praise

Create company-wide visibility and demonstrate appreciation by showcasing your rockstars’ projects at company meetings, and in other internal communications. In addition, provide opportunities for them to meet informally with senior leadership. For example, organize lunch with your CEO or top executives (but don’t force rockstars to wear business suits).

3) Grant Operational Immunity

Exempt your top performers from unnecessary meetings and departmental administrative activities. Streamline monitoring and reporting mechanisms, and minimize structural and procedural requirements. Above all, encourage trial and error. Be prepared to recognize failure (or even celebrate it) as an integral part of learning and progress.

4) Provide Freedom to Explore

Encourage your brightest stars to use 20% of their time to drive independent projects. Grant leave of absence for professional development or participation in industry conferences. Consider providing discretionary budgets to fund exploration and ideation — whatever may sparks fresh thinking. For example, a user experience designer might expand his frame-of-reference by operating as a “visiting fellow” at multiple leading-edge customer sites. Or a biotech product developer might “connect the dots” by creating a private virtual forum where life science incubators can share insights about basic research projects.

5) Acknowledge Achievement Beyond The Organization

Rather than evaluating rockstars on typical performance criteria, consider their role in the industry at-large. Perhaps replace classic one-over-one performance appraisals with peer-to-peer evaluations. And consider metrics based on industry awards and rankings, progress in securing patents, volume and quality of articles published or presented, and other indicators of innovation leadership.

How Do You Encourage Top Talent to Thrive?

Do you have extraordinary people in your organization who need to be led in a special way? What have you done to accommodate them? What kind of issues and results have you seen? Please comment — we’re interested in your thoughts!

Mona Berberich2(Editor’s Note: Mona Berberich is a Digital Marketing Manager at Better Weekdays, a Chicago-based company that has developed a platform to help HR leaders source, screen and develop talent based on job compatibility. She is a researcher and writer covering HR, career growth, talent management and leadership development. Contact Mona on Google+ or LinkedIn or Twitter.)

 

Image Credit: Pixabay

Class of 2013 Goes To Work #TChat Recap

Written by guest blogger, Katie Paterson

The HR community is so generous! This week at the SHRM conference in Chicago, as well as in online #TChat discussions, you’ve helped Achievers and TalentCulture spotlight issues and opportunities facing the next wave of graduates who are entering the workforce.

The ideas flowed freely throughout the week, from the moment we started pouring margaritas at our #SHRM13 booth! Below are summary points about key #TChat topics, followed by resource links and a Storify highlights slideshow. Thanks to everyone for contributing such useful insights!

Social Tools For Job Seekers

LinkedIn received resounding support as the top social hiring hub. Twitter earned some votes as a secondary portal, with other major players like Facebook and Google+ mentioned in supporting roles.

An interesting sidebar thread touched on tools for showcasing professional portfolios. Pinterest was mentioned as a smart choice, as well as tools designed specifically for portfolios, such as Seelio.

Onboarding Improvement

Mentoring received popular support as a way to strengthen employee indoctrination. Workplace “sherpas” are a natural, easy way to introduce new hires to company culture, workgroup standards, and individual responsibilities. And #TChat-ters agreed that this practice is effective for both recent grads, as well as workforce veterans.

“Buddy systems” were also mentioned as a way to connect new hires with one another as they move through the new-hire experience together. Seasoned employees can offer organizational context, but new hires can bond as they learn from each other, in parallel.

Performance Evaluation Frequency

I think @ValaAfshar said it best:

The #TChat community universally applauded continuous constructive feedback, and @Achievers couldn’t agree more. Several chat participants pushed the concept further — indicating that those who are responsible for providing for feedback should also ask for feedback and suggestions, in return.

Why Recognize Employees?

This point might be preaching to the choir, because #TChat-ters were emphatic about recognizing great performance. But it’s noteworthy that two kinds of benefits were mentioned:

1) Human motivation: Many responses focused out how important it is for individuals to hear about their progress — especially when they meet or exceed expectations.

2) Business advantage: Other comments focused on the fact that recognition helps align employees — reinforcing and redirecting work to keep everyone moving together toward organizational goals.

Improving Retention

To engage recent hires, you recommended multiple ways of involving them in the organization. We couldn’t agree more! Offering meaningful work, fostering an inclusive team environment, and tying individual contributions to a broader mission keeps employees engaged and coming back for more.

It’s important to ask for opinions, provide opportunities for growth, and demonstrate consistently that employees are valued. If you inspire passion in your employees, they’ll reward you — not only by remaining loyal, by being your most consistent and vocal ambassadors.

For more information on what motivates the graduating class of 2013, check out Achievers’ latest whitepaper.

#TChat Week in Review

WED 6/12

#TChat Sneak Peek:  Kevin W. Grossman examined the emotional factors that drive employee engagement in a teaser post: “Feeling The Future Of Work: #TChat Meets #SHRM13.”

SAT 6/15

#TChat Preview: Our Community Manager, Tim McDonald, introduced the week’s topics and special #SHRM13 events in his post, “Stronger! #TChat Preview #SHRM13 Edition.”

SUN 6/16

Forbes.com Post: In her weekly Forbes column, TalentCulture CEO, Meghan M. Biro, offered advice about how companies should attract and retain next-generation talent. Read “Smart Leaders Engage Tomorrow’s Workforce.”

MON 6/17

Margarita Monday Meet-up: #SHRM13 attendees timed-out with Meghan and Kevin at the Achievers booth, while hearing about the latest research on “The Class of 2013: Understanding the Needs of the Future Workforce.” If you missed this event, we invite you to attend the Achievers webinar on June 26 (or on-demand after that date).

WED 6/19

#TChat Twitter: #TChat-ters came together on the Twitter stream for our dynamic weekly idea exchange. If you missed the real-time Twitter action, or would like to review highlights, watch the slideshow below:

#TChat Twitter Highlights: “Looking Forward: Class of 2013”

[javascript src=”//storify.com/TalentCulture/tchat-insights-looking-forward-the-graduating-cla.js?template=slideshow”]

Closing Notes & What’s Ahead

NOTE TO BLOGGERS: Did this week’s events prompt you to write about the Class of 2013, or future workforce opportunities and challenges? We’d love to share your thoughts. Post a link on Twitter (include #TChat or @TalentCulture), or insert a comment below, and we’ll pass it along.

WHAT’S AHEAD: Next week we’re tackling a big topic — literally! Big Data in HR! Stay tuned for details this weekend. And remember: starting next week #TChat Radio moves to Wednesday nights at 6:30pmET — back-to-back with #TChat Twitter!

Until then, the World of Work conversation continues each day. Join us on the #TChat Twitter stream, or on our new LinkedIn discussion group. And feel free to explore other areas of our redesigned website. The gears are always turning at TalentCulture, and your ideas and opinions are always welcome.

See you on the stream!

katieprofile.lpeg(Author Profile: Katie Paterson is the Social Media Community Manager at Achievers, where she is focused on building an online community of Human Resources professionals who want to learn how engaged employees can impact business results. She is passionate about the world of social media, its impact on the workforce, and how it can be integrated into the our lives personally and professionally.)

Image Credit: Stock.xchng

 

Create A “Small Company” Culture Anywhere

What is it about small companies? Like a good restaurant or an undiscovered band, they often tend to attract a devoted following that can’t imagine going anywhere else.

Is it the quality of work? The people? The hours? The pay? What is that magical difference that makes small companies so attractive to top talent?

Does Size Matter?

The secret is culture. A strong company culture unites employees and gives them a larger purpose beyond their individual responsibilities. That’s why employees — especially Millennials — gravitate toward start-ups. They crave that “small-company” feel and want the chance to make an impact on culture.

That’s great news if your company is one of the little guys. But what if you’re at a large corporation? How can you offer employees the chance to make an impact if a reputation for process and procedure precedes you? Rules aren’t all bad, of course; structure helps turn chaos into order. But all too often when companies grow, they sacrifice cultural strengths along the way. What to do?

In today’s tough business environment, as large companies struggle to recruit, retain, and inspire top talent, you can’t afford to miss the cultural mark. Instead, why not approach culture as an ace up your sleeve?

Sustainable Advantage

A strong corporate culture can create a huge competitive edge. Driven by organizational values, business objectives, and employee engagement, it aligns your employees, creates fluid communication, and helps build resiliency that adapts to change. If you develop a unique, authentic culture, your employees can reap the benefits of a “small-company” feel, while driving “big-company” results that advance your business goals.

Want the best of both worlds? Here are 5 tips to create a unique culture:

1) Develop corporate values to align employees with business objectives and the bigger picture. Employees need to be inspired by something greater than themselves, so help them understand how their contributions affect the overall strategy.

2) Create a recognition program to reinforce behaviors that drive results. By consolidating recognition efforts with an online program, geographically dispersed employees feel more connected with your company. Recognition helps reinforce company culture — not the other way around.

3) Abolish the top-down hierarchy that’s typical at most corporations, and encourage leaders to be more approachable. When it’s clear that leaders are listening, it facilitates communication and creates an environment where employees feel free to voice their opinions. Host “lunch-and-learn” sessions or fireside chats where leaders and employees can discuss topics in an open, informal environment. Soliciting employee feedback often yields insights that help organizations operate more efficiently and effectively.

4) Let employees know their contributions matter. In “10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You,” leadership consultant Mike Myatt noted that more than 70% of employees don’t feel valued by their employers. You can turn this around in your company by introducing public recognition into your culture. Create monthly luncheons to recognize top performers. Encourage leaders to recognize employees during team meetings. These are simple steps that can make a big difference.

5) Reconsider “years of service” programs that aren’t tied to business objectives or employee engagement. Annual feedback doesn’t cut it anymore. Ideally, employees should receive recognition or feedback at least once a week, yet almost 60% of employees say that doesn’t happen. Create a positive culture of reinforced behaviors by introducing frequent feedback to complement the annual review.

Beyond The Basics

Don’t stop with only 5 steps! While these tips will put you on the right path, you won’t gain that “small-company” feel without also recognizing that culture happens organically, over time. Ultimately, your people will create your culture. Give them the freedom to express themselves. Commit to an evolving process, and see how your culture takes shape.

Image Credit: Pixabay

Create A "Small Company" Culture Anywhere

What is it about small companies? Like a good restaurant or an undiscovered band, they often tend to attract a devoted following that can’t imagine going anywhere else.

Is it the quality of work? The people? The hours? The pay? What is that magical difference that makes small companies so attractive to top talent?

Does Size Matter?

The secret is culture. A strong company culture unites employees and gives them a larger purpose beyond their individual responsibilities. That’s why employees — especially Millennials — gravitate toward start-ups. They crave that “small-company” feel and want the chance to make an impact on culture.

That’s great news if your company is one of the little guys. But what if you’re at a large corporation? How can you offer employees the chance to make an impact if a reputation for process and procedure precedes you? Rules aren’t all bad, of course; structure helps turn chaos into order. But all too often when companies grow, they sacrifice cultural strengths along the way. What to do?

In today’s tough business environment, as large companies struggle to recruit, retain, and inspire top talent, you can’t afford to miss the cultural mark. Instead, why not approach culture as an ace up your sleeve?

Sustainable Advantage

A strong corporate culture can create a huge competitive edge. Driven by organizational values, business objectives, and employee engagement, it aligns your employees, creates fluid communication, and helps build resiliency that adapts to change. If you develop a unique, authentic culture, your employees can reap the benefits of a “small-company” feel, while driving “big-company” results that advance your business goals.

Want the best of both worlds? Here are 5 tips to create a unique culture:

1) Develop corporate values to align employees with business objectives and the bigger picture. Employees need to be inspired by something greater than themselves, so help them understand how their contributions affect the overall strategy.

2) Create a recognition program to reinforce behaviors that drive results. By consolidating recognition efforts with an online program, geographically dispersed employees feel more connected with your company. Recognition helps reinforce company culture — not the other way around.

3) Abolish the top-down hierarchy that’s typical at most corporations, and encourage leaders to be more approachable. When it’s clear that leaders are listening, it facilitates communication and creates an environment where employees feel free to voice their opinions. Host “lunch-and-learn” sessions or fireside chats where leaders and employees can discuss topics in an open, informal environment. Soliciting employee feedback often yields insights that help organizations operate more efficiently and effectively.

4) Let employees know their contributions matter. In “10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You,” leadership consultant Mike Myatt noted that more than 70% of employees don’t feel valued by their employers. You can turn this around in your company by introducing public recognition into your culture. Create monthly luncheons to recognize top performers. Encourage leaders to recognize employees during team meetings. These are simple steps that can make a big difference.

5) Reconsider “years of service” programs that aren’t tied to business objectives or employee engagement. Annual feedback doesn’t cut it anymore. Ideally, employees should receive recognition or feedback at least once a week, yet almost 60% of employees say that doesn’t happen. Create a positive culture of reinforced behaviors by introducing frequent feedback to complement the annual review.

Beyond The Basics

Don’t stop with only 5 steps! While these tips will put you on the right path, you won’t gain that “small-company” feel without also recognizing that culture happens organically, over time. Ultimately, your people will create your culture. Give them the freedom to express themselves. Commit to an evolving process, and see how your culture takes shape.

Image Credit: Pixabay

Engage Your Workforce, No Coddling Required

“Doesn’t everybody love their job?”

During the heat of a #TChat event last week, our partners at TalentCulture challenged the Twitter community with that tongue-in-cheek question. And now I suggest an appropriately tongue-in-cheek response: The answer is no.

So, how do we fix it? And should we fix it?

Employee engagement moves business forward, and should be a priority for any human resources professional. But as the prevailing sentiment among #TChat participants indicated, coddling disengaged employees is not an HR function. Nonetheless, if your employees feel that they aren’t respected or their work doesn’t matter, you need to deal with larger issues than engagement scores.

It’s important to recognize employees for their contributions — in part to increase engagement, but mostly because it’s a vital factor in business success. Several years ago, Gallup estimated that disengaged employees cost the U.S. economy $370 billion annually. High employee disengagement leads to high employee turnover — which, in turn, means increased recruiting and training expenses.

So, if your company is looking to increase overall engagement in a sustainable way, it’s essential to help your workforce understand the meaning and importance of their contributions.

3 Sources of Positive, Tangible Engagement

1) Executive Sponsorship  If your C-suite dismisses the importance of engagement, that will ultimately be reflected in the attitude of managers and employees. Engagement needs to be a priority at the highest levels. Executives who live company values are leading by example. Prove to all levels of the workforce that workplace culture is purposeful — not accidental — and everyone becomes invested in making it the best it can be.

2) Clear Communication  Get the team on the same page by articulating company goals and clarifying how individual goals relate to the bigger picture. True engagement — the result of a satisfying job and not office perks — can only be achieved when employees see how their individual contributions fit into the organization’s mission, values and objectives.

3) Individual Relationships  A great first step in helping employees feel respected is actually demonstrating respect on a personal level. Employees who feel anonymous are at risk of becoming disengaged, and dragging down others’ productivity and engagement. In large companies, it can be challenging for leaders to build relationships across their span of control, however this is essential. Different people respond differently to different motivators. The key to motivating employees is to understand each person well enough to recognize the factors that will help them develop and perform at their best.

For more information on building a culture of engagement, download our 2013 Guide to Recognition.

Image Credit: Pixabay

Recognition: Meaning and Motivation #TChat Recap

(Editor’s Note: Please welcome one of Team TalentCulture’s new editorial interns, Ana Mijailovic. She’s an accomplished university student with mad writing skills, and we’re thrilled to add her perspective on the “world of work.”)

After a week focused on recognition in the workplace — what have I learned? It’s clear that today’s workforce is increasingly disengaged, and lack of recognition is a primary culprit.

So, how can we turn that around? On one hand, a simple “thank you” is free and easy to share, anytime or in any situation. On the other hand, it’s not so free or easy for organizations to practice recognition consistently and effectively.

Case In Point

My first job was at a hospital as an office assistant. At first, I loved working there. I was excited to start making my own money, to cash my own paychecks. The tasks were fairly simple — filing patient charts, filling out medical billing sheets, making copies, everything you would expect from an administrative assistant. The repetition was actually relaxing at first, and my boss constantly acknowledged my speed and work ethic. However, after after several years, my productivity slipped. I met expectations, but without the original energy and speed.

A Problem of Motivation

What’s my point? Even when recognition “looks right” on the outside, it doesn’t necessarily empower employees. Although I loved my boss, my work environment and my colleagues, I was bored. Why? To quote the movie “Office Space,” it was “a problem of motivation.”

Motivation is largely intrinsic. In that situation, no salary increase or external encouragement could motivate me further. What I needed was a challenge. I had mastered the required skills. I had proved my competence. I was ready to reach for the next level, but that option wasn’t made available.

This isn’t uncommon. Managers are often so focused on immediate goals, they forget that many employees want to grow and develop. Offering them a new challenge is a form of empowerment. It demonstrates trust. It demonstrates good faith in the future. It demonstrates commitment to employee success. For those of us who value growth, it’s a promise that helps us keep striving to reach our full potential.

Key Takeaway: Be Mindful and Meaningful

The larger lesson is this:  Every individual is motivated by something. For recognition that really matters, managers should consider what each employee values most, and tailor recognition accordingly.

But don’t just take my word for it. Check the ideas below from this week’s guests and #TChat events. There’s inspiration and advice for employers and employees, alike!

#TChat Week in Review

SAT 5/18

Stan Phelps and Max Brown

Watch video hangouts in the #TChat Preview post…

Setting the Stage:  “Recognition Done Right: 9 Points of Light.” One of our expert guests, Stan Phelps, framed the week’s topic with real-world recognition examples from his new book, “What’s Your Green Goldfish – Beyond Dollars: 15 Ways to Drive Engagement and Reinforce Culture.”

SUN 5/19

#TChat Preview:  Our community manager, Tim McDonald, served up “sneak peek” video interviews with Stan and our other guest, S. Max Brown, Principal of Leadership Directives at Rideau Recognition Management Institute. See what they think matters most about recognition now in “The Business Wisdom of Recognition: #TChat Preview.”

MON 5/20

Forbes.com Post:  TalentCulture CEO, Meghan M. Biro examined startling workforce statistics and suggested remedies in her Forbes column, “Employee Engagement is Every Leader’s Imperative.”

TUE 5/21

TChatRadio_logo_020813

Listen to the #TChat Radio show

Related Post:  Achievers CEO, Razor Suleman, brought a unique twist to our blog by bridging two back-to-back topics in his post, “Workspace Design: Form, Function and Positive Feedback.”

#TChat Radio: Stan and Max joined our hosts, Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman for a 30-minute deep dive into issues and opportunities surrounding recognition and organizational culture, while #TChat-ters chimed in on the Twitter backchannel.

WED 5/22

Related Post:  Career management blogger, Ritika Trikha, offered different point-of-view, with advice for employees who aren’t getting the recognition they deserve, in “Where’s the Love? Recognition DIY.”

#TChat Twitter: The highlight of every week! With Stan and Max leading the way, hundreds of community members gathered around the #TChat feed for an open, thoughtful exchange about workplace recognition. The conversation was so popular that we trended on Twitter again. (It’s becoming a habit!) Were you along for the ride? If not (or if you want a refresh), see highlights in the slideshow below:

#TChat Twitter Highlights Slideshow: “The Business Wisdom of Recognition”

[javascript src=”//storify.com/TalentCulture/tchat-insights-the-business-wisdom-of-recognition.js?template=slideshow”]

Closing Notes & What’s Ahead

SPECIAL THANKS: Again, thanks to Stan Phelps founder of 9 Inch Marketing, and S. Max Brown, Principal of Leadership Directives at Rideau Recognition Management Institute. We’re inspired by your insights and passion for the power of recognition!

NOTE TO BLOGGERS: Did this week’s events prompt you to write about workforce recognition? We’re happy to share your thoughts. Just post a link on Twitter (include #TChat or @TalentCulture), or insert a comment below, and we’ll pass it along.

WHAT’S AHEAD: Next week — if you are fascinated by social business practices (who among us isn’t?), you won’t want to miss this! We’re exploring enterprise community management, with special guests, Maria Ogneva, Director of Product Marketing at Salesforce Chatter Communities, and Jeff Willinger, Director of Collaboration, Social Computing and Intranets at Rightpoint.

Until then, as always, the World of Work conversation continues each day. So join us on the #TChat Twitter stream, or on our new LinkedIn discussion group. And feel free to explore other areas of our redesigned website. The lights are always on at TalentCulture, and your ideas and opinions are always welcome.

Ana Mijailovic-001Enjoy your Memorial Day weekend…and we’ll see you on the stream!

(Author Profile: Ana Mijailovic is a student at Boston University studying Economics and Business Administration. Her experiences in the classroom and in the workplace have taught her the importance of teamwork, collaboration and leadership in organizations. She is one of four bright, community-savvy interns who are contributing to the TalentCulture mission this summer.)

Photo Credit:  Stock.xchng

 

Recognition Done Right: 9 Points of Light

(Editor’s Note: We’re thrilled to share this excerpt from the book, “What’s Your Green Goldfish – Beyond Dollars: 15 Ways to Drive Engagement and Reinforce Culture” by Stan Phelps. For more information about Stan and his “Goldfish” series of business management books, see the end of this post.)

On the 9 INCH journey to the heart of your employees, the 4th INCH involves RECOGNITION.

“You matter. These two words can change your mood, change your mind, and have the power to change lives and the world if we understand and leverage them in the right way.”  –Angela Maiers, TED Talk, June 2011

Recognition fuels a sense of worth and belonging in individuals. No rocket science here. As humans we crave acceptance. Dale Carnegie spoke of the importance of recognition nearly 80 years ago, in his landmark guidebook, “How to Win Friends and Influence People:”

“Be lavish in your praise and hearty in your approbation. A drop of honey gathers more bees than a gallon of vinegar.”

Recognition Resonates

In a recent survey, 35% of workers and 30% of chief financial officers said frequent recognition of accomplishments is the most effective non-monetary reward. Thanking people for their hard work and commitment is key to making them feel appreciated.

Shifting a Mindset

Most managers take an, “if, then” approach to recognition. Positive psychology expert, Shawn Achor believes this paradigm needs to change, “…from thinking that encouragement and recognition should be used as rewards for high performance as opposed to thinking that encouragement and recognition are drivers of high performance.”

9 Examples: Recognition Done Right

Let’s look at 9 companies who give a little extra when it comes to employee recognition:

Kudos and Shout-Outs

Every week The Nerdery agency compiles a video of shout-outs, with employees publicly praising their fellow nerds for going above-and-beyond. Five shout-out recipients are chosen for free lunches the following week. The weekly shout-out video is played for all at the Friday afternoon Bottlecap Talk, where the agency celebrates the successful launch of a recent project with a show-and-tell demo led by the rockstar developers who made it happen.

Custom Awards

Rackspace created a special award for employees who are fanatical about serving customers. It’s simply called The Jacket. It signifies fanaticism and hence is a straightjacket. Only one employee wins the jacket at a time.

Decision Lens awards top-performing salespeople with custom-made action figures designed to resemble the employee.  According to Co-Founder John Saaty:

“It’s a humorous way to acknowledge the great efforts of our sales team, and something that’s more memorable than the usual plaque or something like that.”

Executives at Zappos pick a monthly “hero” and award them with a parade, covered parking spot for a month, a $150 Zappos gift card, and a cape.

Immediate Recognition

American Express has a Prize Patrol. A group of four or five leaders get together and surprise their coworkers with flowers or a gift in front of their colleagues to celebrate their accomplishments.

Take Note: The Best Things In Life Are Free

A recent study confirmed that the cost of recognition awards has only minimal impact on employee perception of appreciation. 57% reported that the most meaningful recognition is free. Just look at some of these quotes to judge the impact:

Former CEO of the Campbell Soup Company, Doug Conant, is a big proponent of the power of handwritten notes. In Doug’s words,

what's your green goldfish cover“Look for opportunities to celebrate. My executive assistants and I would spend a good 30 to 60 minutes a day scanning my mail and our internal website looking for news of people who have made a difference at Campbell’s. Get out your pen. Believe it or not, I have sent roughly 30,000 handwritten notes to employees over the last decade, from maintenance people to senior executives. I let them know that I am personally paying attention and celebrating their accomplishments. (I send handwritten notes too because well over half of our associates don’t use a computer). I also jump on any opportunities to write to people who partner with our company any time I meet with them. It’s the least you can do for people who do things to help your company and industry. On the face of it, writing handwritten notes may seem like a waste of time. But in my experience, they build goodwill and lead to higher productivity.”

Long before he became CEO of iProspect, back as an analyst at Bain Capital and KPMG, Robert J. Murray had an idea on how you should run a services business.

“One thing that always surprised me in prior work experiences is when your assets walk out the door each day, why aren’t companies doing more to value the people doing the business?”

Mr. Murray thinks he’s found the answer to that, and many of his employees agree. His formula:  hire competitive people, promote early and often, and give constant feedback — including  notes of encouragement he calls “iProps.”

Recognizing Milestones

The tenure program at Sweetgreen called Shades of Green has blown up into a competition and become a status symbol among employees. Every teammate gets a free shirt — the longer you’re with Sweetgreen, the darker your shirt. Who knew a free t-shirt could help shape company culture? After you’ve been with Sweetgreen for a year, you also get a pair of green high-top Converse sneakers. At two years, you get a t-shirt and a neon green iPod Nano Touch. After three years, you get a lime-green Sweetgreen bike.

The diamond program Brady, Chapman, Holland encourages generosity in daily work life. When a BCH employee does something exceptionally well for a client, a fellow employee or the community, an acrylic diamond is tossed in a jar. When the jar is full, they celebrate by playing a game or going to a sports bar.

Do these ideas inspire you to think creatively about recognition in your organization? How could recognition be more meaningful where you work?

stan phelps headshot with ruler(Author Profile: Stan Phelps is the Founder of 9 INCH Marketing, an organization that inspires leaders to think differently about business — challenging them to value customer experience as a competitive differentiator and the importance of employee engagement in building a strong corporate culture. Stan helps brands explore new opportunities, showing them how to be more successful in tomorrow’s changing world, and working with clients to create experiences that are memorable, meaningful and on-brand. Driven by client objectives and inspired by bold vision, Stan and his team get results through programs that win big. Visit Amazon.com to learn more about his books “What’s Your Green Goldfish?” (employee engagement insights) and “What’s Your Purple Goldfish?” (customer engagement insights).

 

Business and the Spirit of Sharing: #TChat Recap

Good vibrations. Could you feel them all around yesterday? It’s not just because the holidays are upon us, but because it was 12-12-12 – a day of harmonic convergence. Astrologers proclaimed peace across the universe. The Concert for Sandy Relief rocked Madison Square Garden. And the TalentCulture “world of work” community joined virtual hands around the Twitter stream to align the social responsibility stars.

Live from New York, #TChat moderator Meghan M. Biro, and community manager, Tim McDonald, steered the flow of conversation while sharing holiday cheer with the innovative folks at NYC’s Internet Media Labs. It was a great capstone in a week at TalentCulture that focused on corporate responsibility, social impact and the spirit of the holiday season.

SUN 12/9
Meghan’s Forbes.com post:  “5 Traits of Leaders Who are Ready for Social Good”

MON 12/10
#TChat weekly preview post:  “The Grinch & The World of Work”TalentCulture #TChat Video window of GoogleHangout with Mashable Community Manager

TUE 12/11
Google+ Hangout videoMeghan Peters, Community Manager at Mashable, talked with Tim McDonald about simple ways that companies can make a difference.

#TChat Radio program: Meghan Peters and Brian Sirgutz, SVP of Social Impact at The Huffington Post, discussed issues and opportunities in social responsibility with hosts Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman.

WED 12/12
#TChat: The Wednesday night chat crew took the Twitter stream by storm for a spirited discussion about organizational giving and the greater good.

TChatRadio_logo_020813

Listen to the recorded show now…

So, what have we learned from all this interaction? Did we discover more about why and how business should give back to employees and the community at large? Were we inspired to do more in our organizations and communities?

As I mentioned during last night’s chat wrap, the energy was fun and inspiring, quirky and cynical. Just like a slice of society – all in one happy fruitcake. That’s #TChat! Here are a few takeaways to review and pass along. (Remember – sharing is caring!)

To see full highlights from yesterday’s #TChat session, watch the Storify slideshow at the end of this post.

On the meaning and value of corporate responsibility:

“I almost hate the term ‘social good.’ Just do good. Always. To everyone.” jocelynaucoin

“#Socialgood has become far too trendy + hip leaving it as an obligation for most orgs” MillennialTweet

“I want someone’s definition of #socialgood? A holiday party, Christmas cards, community giving?” megburkett

On commitment to giving:

“Giving at Christmas shows you have the holiday spirit. Giving year around shows you have a giving spirit.” Beverly_Davis

“If you feel like you *have* to give thanks during the holiday season, you’re doing it wrong.” brentskinner

“In many cases the need is greater outside the holiday season, when people aren’t thinking about it as much.” pamelamaeross

On demonstrating gratitude to employees:

“Here’s a thought: integrate gratitude into everything you do every day with everyone.” DawnRasmussen

“Are we making this too complicated? I received a box of Christmas cookies today… and I’ve been smiling all day.” YouTernMark

“Homemade baked goods open hearts!” ReCenterMoment

“Gratitude: Send a email to employee and cc in your +1 – thanking them for specific accomplishments” levyrecruits

“Recognize that 1 size does not fit all. Know ur folks- u’ll know how to express gratitude that does them justice.” MillennialTweet

On leading by example in the community:

“No one should wait for permission, or a title on a business card, to lead/inspire others to do to good.” YouTernMark

“Projecting an image is called marketing…doing is called being a professional…” levyrecruits

“Leaders fall short when they promote #socialgood activities but only on employees own time” AlliPolin

“Matching contributions to charitable organizations of ees choice is a way to encourage good and it is not forced.” TomBolt

“Gr8 examples of enterprise contribution yr rnd: gatesfoundation & many offshoots, initiatives by dell, ge & many others” justcoachit

#TChat Radio Image from BlogTalkRadio

Click to hear this week’s #TChat Radio interview

For me, the top takeaway this week came from The Huffington Post’s Brian Sirgutz. He asked a simple question that is essential to socially conscious individuals and organizations, alike:

“How do people ‘catch’ empathy?”

If we understand how to reach individuals in ways that move them to change themselves for the better, then we can plant a seed that will eventually change the world. And someday perhaps the old phrase, “I already gave at the office” will slip into oblivion – for good.

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NOTE: To see specific highlights from yesterday’s “work life balance” #TChat session, watch the Storify slideshow at the end of this post.

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Closing Notes & Highlights Slideshow

SPECIAL THANKS from TalentCulture to Meghan Peters, Community Manager at Mashable and Brian Sirgutz, SVP of Social Impact at The Huffington Post – guests of this week’s Google+ Hangout and BlogTalkRadio shows. Your depth of knowledge and community leadership is inspiring.

NOTE TO BLOGGERS: If this #TChat session inspired you to write about corporate responsibility and social good, we’re happy to share your thoughts. Just post a link on Twitter (at #TChat or @TalentCulture), or insert a comment below, and we’ll add it to our archives. There are many voices in this community, with many ideas worth sharing. Let’s capture as many of them as possible.

WHAT’S AHEAD: Join us next week, as we look ahead to the New Year by looking “Back to the Future.” Specifically, we’ll look at last year’s predictions about human capital management, hr and learning technologies to determine how far we’ve come. And then we’ll peek at the road ahead! Tune in to #TChat Radio on Tuesday, Dec 18 at 7:30pm ET. Then join the #TChat Twitter discussion on Wednesday, Dec 19, 7-8pm ET to share your ideas and opinions. Look for a full preview early next week via @TalentCulture and #TChat. Thanks!

Image Credit: Niklas Wikstrom

#TChat INSIGHTS Slide Show: Business and the Season of Sharing

[javascript src=”//storify.com/TalentCulture/tchat-insights-the-grinch-and-the-world-of-work.js?template=slideshow”]

#TChat INSIGHTS: The Grinch & the World of Work

Storified by TalentCulture World of Work · Thu, Dec 13 2012 06:40:42

Who’s ready to kick off #TChat ? The one and only @MeghanMBiro at #TheLabNYC http://pic.twitter.com/qFPd9NKQTim McDonald
“@jocelynaucoin: And then the heavens parted for #TChat http://pic.twitter.com/msLepuYW” AHH I can hear the sounds effectsMegan Rene Burkett
Q1: Devil’s advocate: Does it even matter to stakeholders for an org to express the season’s sharing spirit? Why? #TChatMeghan M. Biro
+1 “@melissa_lamson1: A1 Of course stakeholders should. If we connect Social Responsibility & the Bottom Line they’ll care. #TChat”Claire Crossley
A1: Expressing the season’s sharing spirit is a great way to bring artificial barrier btw work and life down #tchatSusan Mazza
A1: Depends on how the organization shows their appreciation. If you send me a Holiday Card Fake Signature~Save your $$$ #TchatLisa Fields
@MeghanMBiro A1: it shows the human side of the organziation & how the employees are treated. When morale is low, so is production. #TChatOrnella Grosz, CFEd®
A1: #CompanyCulture #tchatprettypinkponies
A1. I believe leaders fall short by not showing up for events or taking time to humanize a bit with all employees #TCHATChris Fields, MLHR
A1: Also, is your company, or the organizations you support a good fit for yourself? #tchatprettypinkponies
A1. Leaders don’t project an image of doing #socialgood. They just do it. #TChatTalent Generation
A1: Paying attention to what leadership values helps us become informed consumers, stakeholders, investors, et cetera… #tchatprettypinkponies
keep the great answers coming & don’t forget to use A1, A2 etc. when responding to the questions! #TChatTalentCulture
MT @MarcyLField: When a core value, actions are fr heart of the org & occur thru out the yr making a diff. for all stakeholders. #tchat A1Susan Mazza
A1: As we move forward purpose=profit because orgs will have to contribute in new ways to drive engagement & sales. #tchatIrene Becker
A1: Stakeholders will care when the work directly benefits them. Good leadership connects and elevates the needs of followers. #TChatAndrew Henck
A1. Sharing is caring and caring is the secret sauce for transforming the bottom-line (and everything else.) #tchatMichael Clark
A1. it can give employees a nice break which can boost morale and spirits (and it doesn’t have be overly expensive to do so) #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
A1: Social good isn’t seasonal – it’s year round #tchatJen Olney
A1: If it’s a Small Business perhaps the group could determine a non-profit that could use some Holiday help. Bonus Team building #TchatLisa Fields
A1: Sharing a post I wrote, Goodness to Greatness Leadership 7 Steps from Me to We http://bit.ly/JjMQBH Hope u enjoy it #tchatIrene Becker
@meghanmbiro A1: It builds goodwill with both customers and employees. It should definitely matter to them. #TChatCream.hr
A1: Knowing which charities an organization invest in helps me diversify my own volunteer activites & contributions. #tchatprettypinkponies
A1: I’d rather be given a Kiva gift cert than pizza & a white elephant for 60 minutes #tchatAlli Polin
A1. Organization’s can use the holiday spirit as a catalyst for giving employees what they want the most: recognition for hard work. #tchatMichael Clark
#tchat A1: It matters b/c orgs must put their values into action to be credible and enduringMichael Leiter
When a core value, actions are from the heart of the org & occur throughout the year making a difference for all stakeholders. #tchat A1Marcy Field
A1: Spirit matters and we know the diff between fake sharing and sharing for real heartfelt reasons. #TChatJanis Stacy
A1) how you deal with charity all year speaks volumes about your corp culture. People are not naive #tchatJim Ducharme
A1: No, it doesn’t matter, unless there’s an open bar at the — ahem — “holiday” party. Now *that* is sharing. #TChatBrent Skinner
A1: Employees that are genuinely celebrated feel it every day & esp around the holidays & reflect the feeling to customers #tchatAlli Polin
Yes! “@talemetry: A1: The companies that get it right don’t wait until the holidays to share the spirit of giving and good will. #TChat”Claire Crossley
A1 The way we want to be appreciated is so Different. Does the organ or Leader Customize their Holiday Cheer #TchatLisa Fields
A1 – Too many biz ‘save up’ charity for this time of year. That fact alone nearly eliminates the sense of goodwill. #tchatJonathan Barrick
A1. Expressing a sharing spirit is an individual moment-to-moment choice (just like the rest of the year.) #tchatMichael Clark
A1: Holiday sharing makes good biz sense. It shouldn’t be all about profits, IMHO #tchatDaisy Wright
A1: Some orgs use giving to cover up naughty behavior during the year. You have to be consistent in your actions for it to count #tchatJen Olney
+1 “@melissa_lamson1: A1 Of course stakeholders should. If we connect Social Responsibility & the Bottom Line they’ll care. #TChat”Claire Crossley
A1: If an organization invests in causes I support, I’d probably be more loyal to the org. How about yourselves? #tchatprettypinkponies
A1: Expressing the season’s sharing spirit is a great way to bring artificial barrier btw work and life down #tchatSusan Mazza
A1: It should matter because happy, engaged employees greatly impact the bottom line and the stakeholders investment #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
Agree if we include 12 months 2 MT @RRojo619: A1: Should matter, if employees R content and feel appreciated theyre more productive. #TchatLisa Fields
A1: The companies that get it right don’t wait until the holidays to share the spirit of giving and good will. #TChatTalent Generation
A1: Well, no one really likes a grinch! #tchatEarly Careerists
A1: I think it most important for corps to culturally match with stakeholders, so depends on stakeholders. Yes in USA at least. #tchatJanis Stacy
A1 Of course stakeholders should. If we connect Social Responsibility & the Bottom Line they’ll care. #TChatMelissa Lamson
A1. Expressing a sharing spirit happens individually, in teams, departments, across organizations, with customers. #tchatMichael Clark
A1: It matters to me, baby. Merry Frickin’ Christmas. #TChatKevin W. Grossman
A1: Sharing and celebration is always good for the soul – it fuels the kind of passion that sources the extraordinary #tchatSusan Mazza
A1: What matters to customers/clients should matter to the stakeholders…and customers/clients value sharing ALL YEAR #TChatNancy Barry-Jansson
A1: Not so much in some of the orgs I’ve worked for. It was have a mug, some candy & get back to work #tchatAlli Polin
A1: Should matter, if employees are content and feel appreciated they’re more productive. #TChatRobert Rojo
A1. It should matter stakeholders help mold and shape org culture and cultural sensitivity and tolerance is part of the season #tchatChris Fields, MLHR
MT @gingerconsult: A1: The holidays are a chance to show an org is human but it shouldnt just happen during the holiday… #tchatJennifer King
A1. Expression of the season’s sharing spirit is an individual choice moment-to-moment (just like the rest of the
year.) #tchatMichael Clark
A1: Depends on how the organization shows their appreciation. If you send me a Holiday Card Fake Signature~Save your $$$ #TchatLisa Fields
A1 It would hope it matters; if I’m a stakeholder in an org, I hope I am because our ‘philosophies’ jive #TChatClaire Crossley
A1. random or planned events (holiday related or not) can just increase engagement throughout the organization as a whole #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
A1 meh…”We wish all Goodwill and a Happy Holidays” – then they mess with ya the next 11 months #tchat’Steve Levy
A1)Great leaders know the true value of sharing (all times of the year)..this means stakeholders. Yes it should certainly matter now. #tchatRed Zone Resources
A1) You can get to know a lot about a company’s culture during the holiday season #justsayin #TChatnancyrubin
A1 – It sure should, but not limited to just this time of year. Successful biz’s should give back to communities that helped them. #tchatJonathan Barrick
A1. Charity begins at home – in your community! #TChatDave Ryan, SPHR
A1: Many investors support organizations that support their own values. #tchatprettypinkponies
A1. We have internal and external stakeholders in organizations. #tchatMichael Clark
@TalentCulture A1. The only season that should matter to stakeholders are quarterly earnings calls. #TChatMatt Charney
A1: The holidays are a change to show an org is human but it shouldn’t just happen during the holiday – should be year round #tchatJen Olney
A1 It matters ~ showing you are REAL people caring about REAL things #tchatCASUDI
A1. Sharing during the holiday season harms on one, #Tchat 4 that matter it doesn’t hurt anything year round!Dave Ryan, SPHR
A1. Depends upon whom we consider to be stakeholders. #tchatMichael Clark
A1: Yes. It demonstrates to investors who you are and what you value. #Connection #tchatprettypinkponies
A1: I would hope the values of the “holiday season” would be found in an org culture year round. #TChatAndrew Henck
A1 Don’t think it matters unless perhaps the company is doing poorly. #TChatMelissa Lamson
A1 Yes, I think it’s important. Not expressing holiday spirit demonstrates coldness, bordering on egocentricity. #TChatEnzo Guardino
A1: It depends on what the stakeholder gets out of it. #tchatRob McGahen
A1 No, I don’t really think it matters unless perhaps the company is doing poorly. #TChatMelissa Lamson
Q2: Where do #leaders fall short in projecting an image of doing #socialgood during the season or at any time? #TChatMeghan M. Biro
A2. Dear leaders: It’s more about connecting and caring than the $$$ holiday bonus. #tchatMichael Clark
A2 They also fall short when they miss opps to model giving behaviors. #TchatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A2 Orgs fall short if not integrated into vision, strategic direction. Social good culture isn’t formed by one-offs #TChatClaire Crossley
A2. Get it straight: The more you give the more you get, one way or the other. #tchatMichael Clark
A2 Leaders should lead by example – not expect to dictate it down – if they lead the others will follow #TChatPaul Hebert
A2: When you homogenize gratitude it loses its meaning and value — embed in culture not thru a program #tchatSusan Mazza
A2: Let’s face it. Most employees DO not feel valued + do not work in csr focused orgs. This will change-big orgs can model the way #tchatIrene Becker
Another reason why I left a corp job. “@TomBolt: A2: If employees feel like somebody is “keeping score”, leadership has failed. #TChat”billallemon
A2: We have enough problems evaluating employee performance in a timely manner much less add arbitrary “social conscience” measure #TChatTom Bolt
A2. Dear leaders: It’s more about connecting and caring than the $$$ holiday bonus. #tchatMichael Clark
A2: CSR initiatives also speak to employee engagement, constituent engagement and loyalty…they are the way forward #tchatIrene Becker
A2 They also fall short when they miss opps to model giving behaviors. #TchatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A2. Leaders underestimate the power of a positive words, gestures and actions. #tchatMichael Clark
A2: America has always shined at giving! American corporations can now lead the way. CSR speaks to a better future #tchatIrene Becker
A2: Leaders fall short when they promote #socialgood activities but only on employees own time #tchatAlli Polin
A2: They fall short when they latch on to the word “or” in the question. #TChatBrent Skinner
A2. We have a tendency to internalize our positive emotions towards others and externalize our negative reactions towards others. #tchatMichael Clark
A2: In ON Canada volunteerism is now mandated as part of high sch. curriculumn. Wonderful results that extend to orgs too #tchatIrene Becker
A2 An organization’s holiday social good effort should meet tangible & intangible needs. #tchatJoe Sanchez
A2: The delta between what the company does between Jan-Nov shouldn’t be that much smaller than what they do during Dec #TChatPaul Hebert
A2: Leaders fall short when they are the “show horse” rather than the “work horse.” #TChatJon M
A2: If employees feel like somebody is “keeping score” on them, leadership has failed. #TChatTom Bolt
A2: A leader I know started a community giving task force so he could put it in the newsletter. One soup kitchen & done #sad #tchatAlli Polin
#tchat #A2 Leaders fall short when they have competing priorities. Balance is a tough disciplineMichael Leiter
A2: i.e. contributing to causes that support ‘x’ yet have practices that speak to the contrary.re: Agreed. @CareerTips2Go #tchatprettypinkponies
A2: Actions speak louder than words #TChat and I go back to if you are authentic @ReCenterMoment (sip EggNog) people KNOW and FEEL itLori~TranslationLady
A2. When it comes to engaging, sharing, caring, a little goes a long way. #tchatMichael Clark
A2) Fall short every time they ‘try’ to project #socialgood. Heartfelt sentiment is something that you shouldn’t have to ‘try’ to do. #TchatPhil Komarny
A2: Social good has to be genuine or it’s sniffed out a mile away, seasonal or not. #tchat #tchatAlex Theis
A2: Leaders fall short when they do not include volunteering as part of the program just cutting a check doesn’t cut it #tchatJen Olney
A2: I believe that orgs will also start to include more volunteerism, or reward it as part of corp culture ane emp. engagement #tchatIrene Becker
A2 – many leaders are sociopaths – don’t understand the idea of giving without getting – don’t comprehend charity and caring #TChatPaul Hebert
A2. Expand the definition of #socialgood to include kind words, emotional connections and positive choice making. #tchatMichael Clark
A2: Gr8 examples of enterprise contribution yr rnd: @gatesfoundation and many offshoots, initiatives by @dell @ge and many others #tchatIrene Becker
A2 Leaders fall short when their behavior does not match the “spirit” of those within the organization. #TchatMarla Gottschalk PhD
A2: When they don’t do any #socialgood during the holiday season or year round. #TChatKevin W. Grossman
A2: Org’s fail when they try to turn expressions of gratitude into a “program” or only focus on it once a year #tchatSusan Mazza
A2: Actions that don’t align with CSR-related words do more harm to employee engagement than not mentioning it in the first place! #tchatCassie LP
A2) Fall short when there is no follow up to a big corp announcement that “good is being done.” Show results of time, donation, etc. #tchatinTalent Co
nsulting
A2 – #Leaders fall short when they focus 2 much on the “bottom line” & 4get that their customers are people, not products! #TChatDr. Antoine D. Moss
A2 Orgs fall short if not integrated into vision, strategic direction. Social good culture isn’t formed by one-offs #TChatClaire Crossley
A2: Leaders need to be authentic in their giving & avoid making it a spectacle. People see through this fast. #tchatEarly Careerists
A2: Many leaders don’t tell the story of why or motivation so the sharing seems mechanical/ political. We believe passionate! #TChatJanis Stacy
A2: Leaders fall short when they do not walk the talk. Some only pay lip service. #tchatDaisy Wright
A2 leaders fail at doing #socialgood if it’s just a once a year thing. It should be a value, not an annual task. #tchatJennifer King
Even if motives are displaced it’s always good to do good. Sometimes actions have to lead our hearts. A2 #tchatJocelyn Aucoin
A2. Leaders fall short by not taking the time to get to know those under their charge, and how these times affect each individual. #tchatChance Casas
A2 I keep thinking “Undercover Boss” – “social good” has little meaning unless there’s a change that folks can see #tchat’Steve Levy
A2. Many leaders (and everyone else) fear the transparency created when we authentically reflect another’s greatness. #tchatMichael Clark
A2: #Leaders fall short in projecting #socialgood when it is only about the #image and #onceayear season
A2: Years ago dozens of my co’s employees bonded over Christmas in April. Leaders & newbies hip to hip #socialgood #tchatAlli Polin
A2: Ask the question: does (fill in the blank w/ the social good effort) meet tangible needs? #TChatAndrew Henck
A2. Is it ok to use EGO and LEADERSHIP in the same sentence? #TChatDave Ryan, SPHR
A2 This year we are giving your Xmas bonus to OUR favorite charity! #tchatCASUDI
A2: Inconsistency. #tchatprettypinkponies
A2: It rings a bit hollow when you only do it once a year instead of all year round, doesn’t it? #tchatRob McGahen
A2)”Portion of proceeds” promotions always make me wonder. Why not just say what the portion is….or give a lump/significant amount. #tchatRed Zone Resources
A2: If you act like the Grinch all year long and only show your heart at the holidays your motives may be questioned #tchatSusan Mazza
@meghanmbiro A2: I think it’s a matter of donating time vs. money. Employees who are encouraged to do volunteer work excel. #TChatCream.hr
A2: They fall short when the employees know they are not sincere! #TChatRobert Rojo
A2: Leaders fall short when they are inconsistent in what they do or words don’t match actions. #TChatJon M
A2: When #socialgood is mandated and is a photo-op for leadership instead of out of the desire to do/give #tchatAlli Polin
A2: Sorry, but I’d hope leaders wouldn’t be “projecting” an image of doing good, but influencing others to live it. #TChatAndrew Henck
A2 – when someone asks what’ #TChatPaul Hebert
A2 Social good has to be Authentic. Cheap, nasty and second-thought celebrating is often too evident. #TChatEnzo Guardino
A2: Leaders fall short when they make it about themselves and not about the cause they support #tchatJen Olney
A2 Projecting an image is called marketing…doing is called being a professional… #tchat’Steve Levy
A2: When they make token efforts at the holiday season to ‘reward’ employees. #tchatRob McGahen
keep the great answers coming & don’t forget to use A1, A2 etc. when responding to the questions! #TChatTalentCulture
A2) Leaders lead by example and not by intention or motivational posters :) #tchatJim Ducharme
Q3: What can #leaders do year ‘round to give credibility to end-of-year, seasonal shows of #socialgood & sharing? #TChatMeghan M. Biro
A3) sounds like doing good is really not as important as being good in a corporate karma sense ;) #tchatJim Ducharme
A3: Making #socialgood a team building project – promote it as a way to bring employees together and do good in the process #tchatJen Olney
A3: Reward and recognize others who give back. #tchatprettypinkponies
re: Agreed. Recognition and rewards. A3: @DarkMatterCon @jmass #Tchatprettypinkponies
A3. We can all do a better job of receiving. Strengthen that. #tchatMichael Clark
A3 – Leaders should be authentic all year long…it should be in their DNA to promote #socialgood regularly. #tchatDr. Antoine D. Moss
A3: I appreciate that my financial advisor asks clients what charities matter to them & gives. Works @ work too #tchatAlli Polin
A3: Organizations don’t have #feelings. #tchatprettypinkponies
A3. You’re all leaders, look how much you’re giving here now without any expectation of return. #tchatMichael Clark
A3: I like it when a company has a charity or social movement that it focuses on throughout the year, instead of just vol around xmas #TChatTheJobChaser
+100 @kathyherndon @Beverly_Davis: A3. Giving at Christmas shows you have holiday spirit. Giving yr around shows u have giving spirit #tchatSusan Mazza
“@AshLaurenPerez A3 why does “social good” have to be so stuffy? don’t make it seem like obligation-make it seem like social occasion #tchatSusan Mazza
A3 the problem with only focusing on #socialgood at this time of year is the need is year round. Needs to be culture #TChatPam Ross
A3: Leadership sets the tone – if leaders aren’t authentically concerned the org won’t be either. #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
A3. We can all catch an positive energetic boost during the holidays and end of the year. #tchatMichael Clark
No, not much, I agree! “@ReCenterMoment: A3 Not much worse than insincere emotional expressions of appreciation. #tchat”Claire Crossley
A3: Ask employees what matters to them instead of dictating the only way of giving #socialgood #tchatAlli Polin
A3 leaders need to lead a culture of social good within the workplace and community. @jodysteinhauer does this really well! #TChatPam Ross
A3. Recognize people for recognizing people. #tchatMichael Clark
@pamelamaeross Hi Pam! A3) sharing the message of #social good all year round and recognizing employees who demostrate this. #tchat #tchatJennifer King
A3: Make it possible for people to bring passions to work even if uncomfortable (old org wouldn’t let AIDS Care come speak) #tchatAlli Polin
A3) Greed and short sightedness ultimately erodes everything…history is very clear. #tchatIrene Becker
A3 Not much worse than insincere emotional expressions of appreciation. #tchatMichael Clark
A3) I disagree CSR is an oxymoron. Purpose = Profit. Sustainability is creating value for others. Current recession result of greed #tchatIrene Becker
A3. why does “social good” have to be so stuffy? don’t make it seem like an obligation- make it seem like a social occasion #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
Agreed @ClaireSMBB A3 Leaders/orgs shd celebrate/give in small ways all year long, end the year celebrating all of those & more! #TChatMarcy Field
A3: Three C’s: care, connect, compensate well #tchatAlex Theis
A3: It’s too easy to plaster your logo on collateral. Engage those NPO’s around you, learn their needs + do what you can to meet them #TChatAndrew Henck
A3. Giving at Christmas is shows you have the holiday spirit. Giving year around shows you have a giving spirit. #tchatBeverly Davis
A3: Give (even praise) to those who deserve it all year and giving more at the EOY is icing on the cake #TChatLori~TranslationLady
A3. Too often, the
season’s giving within organizations happens in a one night party with dinner and open bar ( if you’re lucky.) #tchatMichael Clark
A3: Rising to the Challenge Before Us http://bit.ly/LtSwAc America can lead the way in csr. Time to lead forward #tchatIrene Becker
‘@Redzonejobs: A3) Pick a cause, visibly give time, money, etc consistently all yr round culminating in more giving/show real impact #tchatSusan Mazza
A3: Matching contributions to charitable organizations of employee’s choice is a way to encourage doing good and it is not forced. #TChatTom Bolt
A3. invite others to do social good with you- make it a company outting… keep it fun #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
A3 #tchat So much comes down to believing in your values enough to live themMichael Leiter
re: A3: How can an organization demonstrate appreciation for others’ behaviors? @jmass #tchatprettypinkponies
A3 leaders need to BE the moral compass of their group, division, company – it’s binary: Either they are or they aren’t #tchat’Steve Levy
A3) Provide opportunities for employees to volunteer in ways meaningful to them and share ways to participate in corp projects #TChatnancyrubin
A3. set an example and let your employees rise to the occasion #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
A3 – and a questions – how many companies crowdsource their socail resp. with their employees? Cool way to get buy in #TChatPaul Hebert
A3: Encourage employees to give back during the season or year-round. Allow them to take a day to volunteer. #TchatMark Van Baale
A3: Create an internal/external culture + reputation of social engagement + community stakeholders will give you credibility in Dec. #TChatAndrew Henck
A3: Let people talk about their community #socialgood activities at work. It’s not a time sink, it’s a value add #tchatAlli Polin
A3: Empower employees to give back while at work. #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
A3: The actualization of change in relation to csr starts with one change done consistently that will + impact the entire sys. #tchatIrene Becker
A3: Scrap phoney United Way campaigns and other fake charity drives for the appearance of good. #TChatTom Bolt
A3: Create opportunities year round for employees to give back to the community and reward their efforts #tchatJen Olney
A3: Leaders can recognize people that give at work and to the community. #tchatAlli Polin
A3: Give time in the hols to cause they’ve given air-and-volunteer time to over the year – consistency, value & authenticity is key! #tchatCassie LP
A3) Leaders should get in the trenches of social giving and not just endorse/deliver the company checks during the year. #TchatinTalent Consulting
A3. If leadership doesn’t create a consistent culture of recognition and caring, employees will not believe #tchatMichael Clark
A3. Set goals at the beginning of the year/ provide updates throughout/ and results toward the end. Consistency #tchatChris Fields, MLHR
A3 Leaders/orgs should celebrate/give in small ways all year long, end the year celebrating all of those and more! #TChatClaire Crossley
A3. Do things quietly & enjoy the personal rewards. Ethics & Integrity r what u do when no one is watching #TchatDave Ryan, SPHR
A3: Taking care of your EMPLOYEES year round is also #socialgood !!! #TChatNancy Barry-Jansson
A3: Leaders can donate their time and invite people to join them #tchatAlli Polin
EVENING all :-) A3 The year end discussions are not interrogations but idea integration #tchatJohn Kosic
A3: Great leaders can know their employees and work with them year round on important social issues. #TChatJanis Stacy
A3: The Q answers itself. Be giving & give thanks all year long; theoretically, u won’t even have 2 @ Christmas. #TChatBrent Skinner
A3: Aren’t there ppl (or deps) that focus on community giving & sharing in most big orgs? Small orgs could do it, too #TChatNancy Barry-Jansson
A3 Quarterly reminders emphasizing a project. #TChatMelissa Lamson
A3) sharing the message of #social good all year round and recognizing employees who demostrate this. #tchatJennifer King
A3) Pick a cause and visibly give time, money, etc to it consistently all year round culminating in more giving & showing real impact #tchatRed Zone Resources
a3: Walk-the-talk all year and people will see you’re genuine during the holidays. #tchatSalary School
A3 – Donate time. If you want to save your big $ giving for the holidays, then donate time & volunteer throughout the year. #tchatJonathan Barrick
A3) sounds like doing good is really not as important as being good in a corporate karma sense ;) #tchatJim Ducharme
A3 – social consciousness must be part of the everyday before it can be highlighted in the season. #TChatPaul Hebert
A3: Leaders should be consistent in their generosity and message. The ‘missionary of the minute’ leader is always pegged as fake. #TChatTom Bolt
A3: Instead of a token year-end effort, make it a year-round thing. #tchatRob McGahen
A3. Leaders must track internal and external #socialgood just as meticulously as the financials. #tchatMichael Clark
A3: Celebrate people who commit acts of social good and sharing for who they are and what they are providing, not just their actions #tchatSusan Mazza
A3 Social good has to be consistent 24/7, and, where & when possible, cover the cultural spectrum. #TChatEnzo Guardino
A3. encourage employees to do #socialgood – maybe even tie them with contests to keep employees motivated to do it on their own #tchatAshley Lauren Perez
A3: Do more than sponsor an event or write a check. Send your folks out of the office during the workday. #TChatAndrew Henck
A3: Be consistent…Always! #tchatEarly Careerists
a3) Delgate responsibility, set main goal with waypoints and recognize and encourage effort. #tchatJim Ducharme
A3: Reward and recognize others who give back. #tchatprettypinkponies
A3 Make sharing and #socialgood an everyday event #tchatCASUDI
A3: Be consistent with social messaging year round. #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
A3: Making #socialgood a team building project – promote it as a way to bring employees together and do good in the process #tchatJen Olney
A3. Do the same thing all year that they do at the end of year. #TchatDave Ryan, SPHR
A3 – connect the day-to-day to the seasonal events – make it part of the Corp DNA #TChatPaul Hebert
A3: How about do #socialgood year round? #tchatRob McGahen
A3: Partner with organizations and groups and engage in Social Good efforts throughout the year. #tchatAmy Vernon
A3: Make sure they take care of their employees as well as they take care of themselves. After all, it’s bonus time. #TChatTalent Generation
BOOM! Q4: What are traditional vs. innovative ways for #leaders to express gratitude? What’s a good mix? #socialgood #121212concert #TChatMeghan M. Biro
A4) Pay for employees days off when volunteering time. Encourage social sharing of charitable messages. Neither cost $ to employee #TChatTim McDonald
A4: There are no cute tricks to expressing gratitude, but a few new channels for its delivery. Thank you, tech. #TChatBrent Skinner
A4: Make it personal. Keep it real. Show you care. Let them know they matter. — never about the form, always about the impact #tchatSusan Mazza
A4, time is more valuable than pay (to a degree) #tchatTom Spiglanin
A4. Forget titles and positions, lose your fear of engaging people. #tchatMichael Clark
A4 Nearly 40% of e’ees don’t feel they are recognized enough. Recognition, recognition, recognition. Continuous! #tchatJustin Angsuwat
A4: Give people what THEY want, not just what
YOU want… find out what matters #connect #tchatAlli Polin
A4. Everyone must be given fundamental insights into the cycles and rhythm of human performance. #tchatMichael Clark
A4: Seem traditional was thanks, handshake and a “good job”, now not being layed off is showing “gratitude”. We can do better. #TChatJanis Stacy
A4: Saying I appreciate you should not be reserved for the end of the year.Be genuine & be generous with appreciation #tchatAlli Polin
A4. Choosing to be a positive force is the great equalizer of human performance. #tchatMichael Clark
“@MillennialTweet A4: Recgnze that 1 size does not fit all. Know ur folks- u’ll know how to express gratitude that does them justice. #TChatSusan Mazza
A4. Stop holding yourself back. The moment you see good, speak UP. #tchatMichael Clark
Yes! “@ReCenterMoment: A4. Like great teachers, leaders should always be watching for and recognizing positive performance. #tchat”Erin Colleen Goodell
A4: Seem traditional was thanks, handshake and a “good job”, now it seems not being layed off is the show of “gratitude”. #TChatJanis Stacy
A4. Engage one-to-one, moment-to-moment, in real-time IRL. #tchatMichael Clark
A4: Please preserve the sanctity of “sharing” – and make it a gamification-free zone ;) #tchatExpertus
A4 (Just 4 Fun) Cash, Liquor, Furs, Expensive Autos, Gambling Trips, Viagra and recognition #TchatDave Ryan, SPHR
A4: A good, old fashioned “thank you” always works. #tchatBright.com
A4: Make it personal. Keep it real. Show you care. Let them know they matter. — never about the form, always about the impact #tchatSusan Mazza
A4: Let team members nominate each other for recognition from leadership… a lunch, coffee or time spent w/leader #tchatAlli Polin
A4. Where and how are you concentrating your moment-to-moment attention and energy? #tchatMichael Clark
A4: Recognize that one size does not fit all. Know your folks + you’ll know how to express gratitude that does them justice. #TChatAndrew Henck
A4 All research points to frequent feedback & recognition. New social technologies enable us to do it right! #tchatJustin Angsuwat
A4. What you put your attention on grows. What you remove your attention from shrinks. #tchatMichael Clark
A4. Like great teachers, leaders should always be watching for and recognizing positive performance. #tchatMichael Clark
A4: I went to a catering meeting for our holiday party & gave our fabulous admin @EliseGilmore33 a gift card to the store upon return #TChatLori~TranslationLady
Down with job titles! MT @markvanbaale: A4: dont let ur title make you prideful. Personally thank ur employees. #tchatJocelyn Aucoin
#Tchat A4 Orgs who produce good will in their local community showcase their genuine nature offline: Gratitude is amplified by social mediaALEX BOTTOM
A4: Every ee has a goal, why don’t you find that goal and help them achieve it. #TChat i.e. higher ed, sales, networking, etcRabih Najjar
A4 When planning employee engagement events, see if there’s a link to social good – like volunteering as team at food bank #TChatPam Ross
A4: There’s no formula (i.e., no “right mix”) 2 expressing gratitude. Do it whenever u mean it. Use lotsa channels. #TChatBrent Skinner
A4: Don’t just give $$ – make sure they know why they matter & are appreciated #tchatAlli Polin
A4: I’d assume that “innovative ideas” aren’t widely executed, right? Doesn’t the latter = tradition? #TChatAndrew Henck
A4)Bring those impacted by company volunteerism in to meet those who cared enough to help/contribute. Make it human. #connect #tchatinTalent Consulting
A4: If you’re a CEO or president of a company, don’t let ur title make you prideful. Personally thank ur employees. #TChatMark Van Baale
A4: How do you know you have a good mix? Watch and listen – do people around you incl you feel appreciated? #tchatSusan Mazza
A4: Be mindful of those around you. See how they live/work + what needs they have. Respond accordingly w/ gratitude. #TChatAndrew Henck
A4 – send a note that says “you’ve still got a job” – the anti layoff #TChatPaul Hebert
A4 – Want an innovative way to appreciate? Give them something nostalgic. Connect to childhood. Means you need to learn about them. #TChatJonathan Barrick
A4) Pay for employees days off when volunteering time. Encourage social sharing of charitable messages. Neither cost $ to employee #TChatTim McDonald
A4: Make time for 1×1 time that starts with: I appreciate you because… #tchatAlli Polin
A4: Show up. Be present. #tchatprettypinkponies
A4: Traditionally: a crackin’ Christmas party and a positive outlook on the New Year. #TChatTheJobChaser
A4: The best know that personal touches, handwritten and from the heart leave their mark on others #tchatJen Olney
A4. Leaders must create and engage a strategic plan for becoming a positive force of recognition and #gratitude. #tchatMichael Clark
A4: Don’t know about the mix, but a pat on the back and a ‘thank you’ means a lot to most ppl. #TChatTom Bolt
A4 take a moment and listen observe and respond to those not at shareholder level @tamcdonald @MeghanMBiro #tchatJohn Kosic
A4: Find ways to involve everyone vs. use a committee to “put on a show” #tchatSusan Mazza
A4: Be more original than handing out gift cards – make it personal and leave a lasting impression #tchatJen Olney
A4 Look at all of your partners/vendors. good example – check out @Zoealliance #socialgood #tchatPam Ross
A4: Gratitude should certainly go beyond financial reward #TchatScott M. Hutcheson
A4: I could submit people on my team & their story to the CEO/President & they got a personal note of thanks #tchatAlli Polin
A4: Innovative or not, just make it heartfelt and honest. Appreciation is not just for the holidays. #tchatPhil Komarny
A4) Getting on vid or PA system in office is traditional/tired, as is mass thx email. Leaders GO where emp actually sit and say thx! #tchatRed Zone Resources
A4. The most innovative way for #leadership to give back is to engage-connect-share-care with each and every employee. #tchatMichael Clark
A4 no reason to be fancy but your boss can always write you a nice LinkedIn recommendation -even if it makes u more recruitable #tchat’Steve Levy
A4. Saying Thanks a job well done publicly and privately #TChatDave Ryan, SPHR
A4: A specific thank you for a specific accomplishment – shows the leader is engaged and aware of contributions. #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
A4: Authentic expressions of gratitude are as contagious as laughter – use social technology to fuel the contagion #tchatSusan Mazza
A4: Let your “world of work” express its holiday self, within reason of course. I want a “Rock of Ages” Nativity scene on my desk. #TChatKevin W. Grossman
A4: Give options beyond $$. Set boundaries & ask what’s important to them #tchatAlli Polin
A4: Get creative by shining a light on employees. Used to print a cookbook with employee recipes. Sent to every client. #tchat #twoferBryan Chaney
A4 Traditional would be plaques, award ceremonies, ‘an exercise’ imo. Innovative, for me, can be as simple as an unexpected thank you #TChatClaire Crossley
A4: There are no cute tricks to expressing gratitude, but a few new channels for its delivery. Thank you, tech. #TChatBrent Skinner
A4: Does my heart good to see an executive serving at the local food bank! #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
A4 Gratitude: Send a email to employee and cc in your +1 – thanking them for specific accomplishments #tchat’Steve
Levy
A4: Meaningful expressions of gratitude opens hearts in any form – traditional or innovative – choose whatever is natural for you #tchatSusan Mazza
#Tchat #121212concert A4 say a heartfelt thank you!alinalara
A4 – just pay it forward – in any way that makes sense #TChatPaul Hebert
A4: Send a thank you note to your staff members family noting how proud they should be. #tchatEarly Careerists
A4) never give your staff fruitcake! #tchatJim Ducharme
A4: “Thank you” never goes out of style. #TChatTalent Generation
A4 – who are we expressing gratitude for? to whom? Emps? Others? Vendors? Clients? the world? #TChatPaul Hebert
A4 Tech and Tradition can mix. Orgs have to demonstrate gratitude in line with normal operating standards & possibly exceed them. #TChatEnzo Guardino
A4: Traditional: year-end. Innovative: year-round. #tchatRob McGahen
>> Anyone? LOL >> Q5: How is technology helping orgs to express gratitude? What are the pros and cons? #TChatMeghan M. Biro
A5 tech helps spread messages way faster (pro). A con is tech can be overused & become impersonal if not balanced w/ face-to-face! #tchatJeff Waldman
A5. Look at us here now engaging-connecting-supporting across the world. #tchatMichael Clark
A5: Given a choice? Pick up the phone, walk to someone’s desk. Tell them thanks & you matter. Tech is fast, IRL connects #tchatAlli Polin
A5: Beware of over-relying on technology. Make sure u express gratitude in a way that creates meaningful connection #tchatSusan Mazza
A5. Strengthening our capacity to receive, expands our desire to give. #tchatMichael Clark
A5: Good witch/bad witch – social channels amplify stories & msgs of “good” works. But can cross-over to forced/contrived self-promo #tchatExpertus
a5) seen today, email appreciation to a team from VP, copied to all cognizant parties including all team members’ line mgt. #class #tchatTom Spiglanin
A5 a con w/ tech is if it’s used for someone who is not comfortable being recognized publicly – need to fit the channel w/ the person #tchatJeff Waldman
A5: “Technology” has connected me to countless causes, needs and orgs to channel gratitude + support (i.e. @Kiva @WorldVision @IJMHQ) #TChatAndrew Henck
A5: We have the ability to reach out and touch more with the platforms, for that we can all be grateful #tchatJen Olney
A5: A note of thanks on email can be saved & shared easily. CC used well! #tchatAlli Polin
A5 Can develop an online form to nominate other employees. Recognition from fellow employees means a lot to workers. #TchatHeather Rothbauer
A5: Ecards make it easy and cheap… get it? “cheap!” #tchatNeil MacGregor
A5)Overall technology is good but can make the interaction/expressions of gratitude seem less personal. Again..connection is good. #tchatinTalent Consulting
A5) If you’re real tech is your timeline of goodwill through the year. Create a culture page on your site – show em some soul. #tchatJim Ducharme
A5. Oh, the wonderful places we will go united via #tech #tchatMichael Clark
A5: Employee appreciate via #SocialMedia is a great way to recognize good deeds. #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
A5: Personal use Tech gifts are cool!! IPad? Also tech helps expand awareness. But showing gratitude needs be personal. #TChatJanis Stacy
A5: Those with smart phones can text donations – but not everyone has a smart phone (newsflash) #TChatNancy Barry-Jansson
A5: Tech can help us express gratitude real-time. On a biz trip & can IM my team member to recognize good I heard about #tchatAlli Polin
A5) network-based technology increases agility to recognize achievement; challenge is keeping it personal, need to be genuine #tchatTom Spiglanin
A5: A nice, simple note of personal thanks from a leader/manager via email to employees can be done w/today’s tech. #TChatMark Van Baale
A5 Some good info like the NYC cop buyt the boots gets sent around the world quickly #TchatDave Ryan, SPHR
A5: Tech makes gratitude easier, but less personal and authentic. #TchatScott M. Hutcheson
A5 tech gives ppl more options to recognize but is only 1 option of many! #tchatJeff Waldman
A5 – tech has made it too easy – reduces the “personal.” Made it efficient at the cost of effective #TChatPaul Hebert
A5. #Tech + #Community + #SocialGood = Saving our beautiful planet. #tchatMichael Clark
A5) Technology helps gratitude go viral for one thing! :) #tchatRed Zone Resources
A5 tech can help share recognition broadly, publicly – BUT can’t be the only way – doesn’t replace IRL genuine Thank You #TChatPam Ross
A5 tech helps spread messages way faster (pro). A con is tech can be overused & become impersonal if not balanced w/ face-to-face! #tchatJeff Waldman
A5: (insert cliche comment on the “human touch” that is needed) #TChatAndrew Henck
A5. Look at us here now engaging-connecting-supporting across the world. #tchatMichael Clark
A5 Too much tech is distancing Orgs and gratitude has less value than before. Done tastefully, the pros outweigh cons #TChatEnzo Guardino
A5 #Tchat Paper greeting cards thru snail mail are unlikely to be a spam scam but ecards . . .Michael Leiter
A5: #Tech speeds up communication and engagement #tchatKathy Herndon, GPHR
A5: Just more opps to do so. But do tech right, or you’ll be right back @ seeming inauthentic again. #TChatBrent Skinner
A5 Tech flattens an org, but not the holiday spirit. Real comms, and real feelings across the org are made easier by tech. #tchatNeil MacGregor

#Nifty50 & Showing #Gratitude Social Media Best Practice

Today, I have two amazing reasons to be grateful: Cheryl K. Burgess (@ckburgess) and Pam Ross (@pamelamaeross) have nominated me for the “#Nifty50 Women in Technology on Twitter for 2012” and “The Five HR People You Meet on Twitter,” respectively.

Social media is fast and always changing. The pace of it all can be distracting. But it is essential to take a step back and take time to express gratitude — better yet, #gratitude. Showing #gratitude is a best-practice in social media. Here’s why:

  • It humanizes the business and separates the business aspect from the person behind the business.
  • Stronger relationships are built through appreciation and positivity toward one another.
  • #Gratitude is one of the reasons why social media business is developing rapidly as people connect with each other at different levels!

I’m just as much a mentee as a passionate mentor, I am learning much, much, much from all the generations every day — this whole business of social media works on the foundation of “Reverse Mentoring.” It is an honor to be nominated to these lists and recognized by other mentors in the same business. I heart Social! I’m very grateful to the amazing friendships, weekly inspiration and connections I have gained along the way.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart. I never take my valued relationships for granted. This made my week!

Image Credit: WoodleyWonderWorks on Flickr

Perks Don't Kill Potential, People Do: #TChat Recap

I’ve been in the dentist’s chair two times in the last two weeks. There’s one scheduled for next week, too. Ugh. This exercise is tough on the teeth, but even more wearing on the wallet. Of course I could never really tell the latter to my colleagues who work within the walls of a formal workplace, where life in the bullpen and dental benefits are business as usual.

No ma’am, I wouldn’t dare utter a word of these woes of mine. Doing so would risk a barrage of comments like, “Well you get to work in your pj’s,” and, “At least you can make an appointment for any time you want.” True. Can’t argue with that. “But at least you get benefits,” I’d retort, using in my inside voice.

What does that mean, anyway — benefits? As Cyndy Trivella said in last night’s #TChat, “doggie daycare reimbursement and free dry-cleaning no longer cut it,” especially when career perk couture includes in-office massages and a workplace Nintendo Wii. Organizations are no longer in a war for talent. No, that would be too obvious; they’re instead operating in stealth mode, ninja recruiting with weapons of mass relaxation.

Innovation and entrepreneurship paired with good old-fashioned hard work have created a new era of “fringe” benefits. When I say fringe, I mean like the sci-fi TV show, where each episode unfolds another twist in the mystery of unexplained phenomena. In the real world, sci-fi is replaced by “start-up” and is a matter of fact.

As an entrepreneur I get that I won’t be able to access the Area 51 of benefits. This is my reality — but I also get some pretty sweet perks… like having a voice. Despite all the fancy tricks organizations are throwing around these days, it seems like they aren’t necessarily getting Recognition 101: Listening right. At least that’s what the #TChat community told us last night.

So the not-having-a-dental-plan thing isn’t sounding all that terrible now. I almost feel guilty saying I also get to travel to fantastic places on occasion (my recent Bermuda tan is a dead giveaway). And then there’s my upcoming trip to Chicago in early August for the 2012 Illinois State Society for Human Resource Management Conference.

OK, technically we’ll be outside of the city, but it’s to collaborate with TalentCulture co-founders Meghan M. Biro and Kevin W. Grossman to host a live #TChat, so it’s still awesome. We’ll be part of the perk that the conference is (for many). And literally, we’ll be giving people a voice — a mic, speaker, the whole shebang — on a topic that’s about giving talent a voice (again, literally).

After all, that’s what its about — creating the space to ask what #TChat-ter and thought leader Vala Afshar says are the most important questions: “What do you think?” and “How can I help?” Then, its up to us, all of us, to “listen loudly.”

Community is the collective voice of #TChat and you exercised your voice last night, as you do every week. Thank you! To see what we mean, check out the slide show below. If you missed the preview, you can read it here. Stay tuned for additional information on our exciting collaboration with #ILSHRM12 and more, and if you’re attending, be sure to give us a shout-out in the stream and in person!

Image Credit: Stock.xchng

 [javascript src=”//storify.com/TalentCulture/tchat-insights-give-me-a-break.js?template=slideshow”]

#TChat INSIGHTS: Give me a Break

#TChat INSIGHTS: Give me a Break

Storified by TalentCulture · Wed, Jul 18 2012 17:35:41

Only 60 minutes until #TChat! Preview: http://su.pr/1YbqQe http://pic.twitter.com/H4sC7lAC #workflex #usguysTalentCulture
Here I am w/ @ittechexec getting ready for back-2-back #tchat & #tcfchat gr8 forums for our techies! http://pic.twitter.com/7bCraow3rezlady
Q1: Extreme perks—are these examples of strong #leadership or something else (or both)? #TChatSalima Nathoo
A1: Don’t really have 1st hand recent experience with EP’s but would think in recovering economy it is necessary for retention. #TChatTom Bolt
A1: Extreme perks are a way for employers to be competitive and attract the best. Look at Silicon Valley’s competition for coders #tchatBright.com
A1: They are great examples of ways orgs try to put employees first in order to retain them & keep the environment comfortable #tchatJoshua Barger
A1: EP can be a short term fix but when the well runs dry, what is your next trick? #tchatJen Olney
A1: extreme persk seem to be more of a recruiting strategy I think. Candidates are in limited, well..the ones that comp want #tchatPlatinum Resource
A1 It seems the motivation behind “extreme perks” reflects the strength (or not) of the leadership ~ does that make sense? #tchatCASUDI
A1: In the right circumstance, both. If ur bribing an unhappy employee then no, if ur rewarding ur team then, yes #TChatBrandie McCallum
A1: Leadership has to be on board, friend has a 4 story slide @ his work, if ldrship didn’t encourage that it’d never exist! #tchatJess ‘Babs’ Bahr
A1 Workplace perks don’t have to be ‘extreme’ to be effective. Start w/”thank yous” and work up. #tchatSam Fiorella
A1: Opposite is not true: No EP’s does not necessarily indicate weak leadership. #TChatTom Bolt
A1: Compensation comes in many forms beyond cash. #tchatRob McGahen
A1 Not my area of expertise-but I would say this trend is the result of smart and innovative leadership/staying ahead of the curve. #TChatJanine Truitt
A1: With strong demand for extremely specialized skills, it’s strong leadership to offer extreme perks to attract and rtn these folks #tchatRichard S Pearson
A1: Extreme Perks can be seen as good leadership because they just want to make sure that they keep the the best employees #tchatJumpstart HR
A1 EP are good ex’s of strong, along w/ innovative, leadership & culture imo. Strong bc they recognize importance of ee’s #TchatClaire Crossley
YES! MRT @CzarinaofHR: A1 I would say this trend is the result of smart and innovative leadership/staying ahead of the curve. #TChatCyndy Trivella
A1. Leaders should be compensated/pai d well but have the sense to know what is too much #TchatDave Ryan, SPHR
A1: It seems such perks started as a way to reward best talent: Good Leadership! Have perks become the only way? Sustainable? #tchatMark Salke
A1 With cash compensation being scarce…it’s only natural that orgs find other innovative ways to reward & retain their employees #TChatJanine Truitt
Focus on retention not just attraction! MT @JumpstartHR: A1: EP good leadership b/c they want to make sure to keep the best employees #tchatJess ‘Babs’ Bahr
A1: It depends, sometimes extreme perks can be an example of poor #leadership, in other cases they are #motivating. #tchatBusinessWorldRising
A1:both? seems like some “perks” are really just treating ppl like adults w a brain & not worker bots who shd feel lucky 2 b employed #tchatErin Hommeland
#TChat a1: people spend a lot of time at work these days, EPs can attract candidates because their employer can make life a little easierAshley Lauren Perez
A1: Extreme perks = tricks often used 2 get ppl hired and keep them, but don’t look behind the curtain, Dorothy! #TchatStephen Van Vreede
A1 – I personally think paid for education, paid training courses, heath and fitness related perks are best – help emp. and co. grow #tchatRichard S Pearson
+1RT @JumpstartHR A1: Extreme Perks can be seen as good leadership becoz they just want to make sure they keep the the best employees #TChatPadma Mohanram
A1: If co can’t afford EP’s it is def not leadership. Incentives can be special T-shirt or coffee mugs. Attention is appreciated #TChatTom Bolt
A1: Torn on this one — how do #leaders look when times get tough & they must scale back the extreme perks? #TChatBrent Skinner
A1: Extreme perks on 1 side show desire to retain. On the other lack of sincere work ethic. #TchatBeverly Davis
A1: Ham at Christmas, turkey at Thanksgiving–not extreme perks but employees thought giver was best boss ever #TchatCareer Action
A1: Nothing beats the feeling of surprising an employee with an extreme perk #TChatSean Charles
A1: Supply donuts on Friday morning and watch “sick day” numbers drop!! #tchatSam Fiorella
A1: shows generosity and investing in the employer beyond just short term. #tchatPlatinum Resource
A1 Leaders keep an ear to the ground & know what would work in their culture as well as what is being done across their industry #TChatJanine Truitt
A1: Extreme perks can back fire. Give 2 much 2 soon & expectation for future rewards can get out of whack #TChatSean Charles
A1 “Extreme perks” may not necessarily be the ones most valued by employees. Leaders need to know what’s valued. #tchatJoe Sanchez
A1 Life is so busy for ee’s- an org that offers possibilities that will make life easier is bound to be the employer of choice #TChatJanine Truitt
Q2: Most of the economy is lagging. Is the tech market really all that different? What’s driving the generosity? #TChatSalima Nathoo
A2: The ever growing and changing demand for the next best thing is driving the generosity #tchatBusinessWorldRising
A2: Has to do with income and profitability. Tech usually leads and talent costs more. #TChatTom Bolt
A2 imo, budget alignment due to culture/sector difference. Recruiting & hi-turnover costly; spend $$ on retaining ee’s #TchatClaire Crossley
A2: If generosity becomes seen as entitlement it will be difficult to cut out EP’s when things go sour. #TChatTom Bolt
A2 Current generosity is a focus on keeping the best talent IMO > not all bad! #tchatCASUDI
A2: BIG Perks are a result of BIG competition, not BIG corporate generosity. #justsayin #tchatSam Fiorella
A2 – I’d suggest part of the generosity is that the industry grew in a new generation; more trad biz r trying to figure it out. #tchatJudi Samuels
A2: Just following up to Q1, really I think it’s a tool to stand out and attract the best talent. The benefits pay for themselves #tchatJoshua Barger
A2: #tech market can’t decide if there’s a talent shortage in US. Definitely is for select tech #jobs, so comps attracting talent #TchatStephen Van Vreede
A2: Perhaps lots of lessons learned from the tech bubble bursting. People are being smarter. #tchatRob McGahen
#TChat a2: they understand that all ppl r different and try to be innovative about offering alternative work environments. They take chancesAshley Lauren Perez
A2: It’s the People in the Tech Market that are differ, they are more creative, kno their staff #TChatBrandie McCallum
A2: Tech is 1 industry that is resistant to fluctuations in economy. A driving force for the economy & therefore makes its own rules #tchatP
latinum Resource
A2. If you got big profits – you can have big perks #NoProblem #TchatDave Ryan, SPHR
A2: I suspect market for talent is like any other… supply and demand drives pricing (comp and perks) #tchatCLOUDTalent
A2 Many orgs are turning to tech to improve inefficiencies and manual processes in an effort to streamline and get lean #TChatTeala Wilson
A2. #tech market is diff for ppl w/much needed, hard-2-find skills. Comps aren’t being generous; their eager to attract/retain. #tchatSheree Van Vreede
A2: In short, market forces driving #tech job market and perks offered. Always pesky fundamental truth of supply vs demand #TchatStephen Van Vreede
A2: It’s risk & reward – I’m willing to invest in big perks now so that EE productivity will pay them off in the long run #tchatBright.com
A2 The generosity in tech is driven by the in demand jobs and the cream of the crop talent they have to attract. #TChatJanine Truitt
A2: The tech market is always in demand and if they want to retain their employees, they have to be generous #tchatJumpstart HR
A2: It’s more about recognition. Recognize that ppl want to be appreciate in diff ways. Regularily. We make you $$ so pay it forward #tchatPlatinum Resource
A2 A lot of tech ppl worked for companies that sucked & didn’t appreciate the nerds, so they started a company and made it awesome #tchatJess ‘Babs’ Bahr
A2. Generosity seems to be an outcome of the evolution of sustainable employee engagement #TChatSalima Nathoo
A2: Creativity in tech is knowing what makes your folks tick, doesn’t have to be large, just has to inspire #tchatJen Olney
A2: Generosity comes from shortage of developers & engineers w very specialized skillsets: simple supply & demand despite bad economy #TchatWendy Beecham
A2: Money! People with big pockets are still investing heavily in Tech right now #Oracle #SalesForce #TChatSean Charles
A2: Tech industry knows how to tailor their perks. As long they are specific & relevant they are seen as generous. Pass the donut plz #tchatPlatinum Resource
A2 The tech industry is a different animal altogether. They are an industry driven by innovation so their perks must follow suit. #TChatJanine Truitt
A2: Tech market needs highly skilled workers, who are therefore in high demand. So, yes, it’s def diff. #TChatBrent Skinner
A2 – best perk stock options!!! Surprising how they motivate and attract talent!!! #tchatRichard S Pearson
A2: Since the dot com boom days, extreme perks have become part of the fabric of this industry’s culture. Candidates expect them. #tchatDave Ellis
Q3: How can companies in a competitive market for talent exercise #innovation in attracting and retaining talent? #TChatSalima Nathoo
A3: Attracting: Fast-track the hiring process so that black holes don’t suck the life out of the program. #TChatTom Bolt
A2: Supply and demand. Tech talent is limited. Competition is therefore stiff. May the best indoor playground win! #TChatJoel Peterson
A2: big skills gap is killing jobs and economic growth but those with skills and their tech employers are quite well #tchatJohn T. Lawrence
A3: Retaining talent: Promote a culture that listens to employees and respond…even if the answer is no, say something. #TChatTom Bolt
THIS -> MRT @czarinaofhr: A2 Tech industry is diff animal altogether, an industry driven by innovation so perks must follow suit. #TChatBrent Skinner
A3: Offering an exciting and enjoyable workplace b/c they need to be able to picture themselves working there #tchatJumpstart HR
A3 Doing that extra for your employees whether EP or inspiring them to make a difference :-) Best perk= making a difference! #tchatCASUDI
A3 Perks can be costly but not always necessary if orgs are innovative; sometimes it *is* the small things that matter! #TchatClaire Crossley
A3: The key is to tailor your brand and your perks to the talent types you want to attract #tchatBright.com
A3 Letting go of old insecurities around how an ee should be rewarded. Employers need to be accepting and willing to bend a little. #TChatJanine Truitt
A3: Make an effort to fill the individual needs of the employee; Just b/c no one else uses MS Project doesn’t mean I don’t want it! #tchatJess ‘Babs’ Bahr
A3. Ignite innovation at the personal brand level. Hire those who identify themselves w/innovation then let them unleash it. #TChatSalima Nathoo
#TChat A3: have employees create and suggest their own perks and let them be awarded it when they reach goals they set or themselves & teamAshley Lauren Perez
A3: innovative co attract/retain talent by allowing employees, who are also customers, speak to what’s next for the co #TChatBeverly Davis
A3: Be creative, and generous, with compensation packages. People will love you. #tchatRob McGahen
A3: Maintain a culture that rewards… excellence, loyalty, teamwork, innovation etc. Not just perks for the sake of perks #tchatDave Ellis
A3: Being purposeful when hiring: look beyond skills to fit- if they really fit and are committed 2 mission= retention + loyalty #TchatWendy Beecham
Straight to my heart MT @CASUDI A3 Doing extra 4 ur ees whether EP or inspirng to make a difference :-) Best perk=making a difference #tchatDeb Maher
A3: Even if there are extreme perks, not being able to wake up and be excited to go to work would not retain even the best talent #tchatJumpstart HR
A3. To fuel innovation – we must excepting of failures #tchatDave Ryan, SPHR
A3: Employee involvement in the process is huge – if you are offering perks that no one takes advantage of – are they really perks? #tchatJoshua Barger
A3 Really get to know your target candidate. Show up in places they wouldn’t expect to find you (But dont be a creepy stalker either) #TChatTeala Wilson
A3: Create the culture that attracts talent to seek out your company, not just for $$ but for innovation and leadership #tchatJen Olney
A3: Priority 1: value existing emps + retention of top performers, elim of poor performers…then attracting easier, less frequent #tchatStephen Van Vreede
A3: Attracting top talent is automatic when you build company that people WANT to work for. Simple as that. #tchatSensei Marketing
A3: Monetary compensation is primary, but for #innovation in #retention & #engagement, think beyond $$$ #TChatBrent Skinner
A3 Many orgs expect ee’s to do more w/ less of everything from resources to compensation and as a result employees are less engaged. #TChatJanine Truitt
A3: Let your team know everyday that they matter. It’s all in the experience not the outcome. #TChat #YouMatterSean Charles
A3: attract – w/ benefits/value. retain – w/ continuous recognition & value in the process + perks sporadically = #happyemployee #tchatPlatinum Resource
A3: In some industries monetary only goes so far – for some, it’s the culture, environment, and engagement in unique projects #tchatBright.com
#tchat a3: ask candidates what attracts them to the company and build off of that.Ashley Lauren Perez
A3: Innovation ok but not really necessary. Pay fairly and treat ppl w/ excellence. What more is needed? #tchatStephen Van Vreede
A3 If you’re a company that can’t afford a perk let alone an extreme perk try saying “thank you” once in awhile. It still works. #TChatJanine Truitt
A3: Leadership needs to be on purpose. Recognize >> Reward >> Repeat! #TChatSean Charles
MRT @CzarinaofHR: A3 If U R at a CO that can’t afford a perks try saying “thank you” once in awhile. It still works. #TChat <#TrythisDave Ryan, SPHR
A3: flex work schedules, open workspaces, open communication, casual dress and be willing to
pay for the best when u find them #tchatJohn T. Lawrence
#TChat a3: even if I didn’t get hired by a company, I’d be willing to network w them if it meant giving them ideas to help them & employeesAshley Lauren Perez
Q4: A healthy economy begets dynamic compensation & benefits for employees. How does HR technology figure in? #TChatSalima Nathoo
A4: Flexible and responsive HR tech will keep employees in the know and comfortable with the culture. #TChatTom Bolt
A4: HR also needs to learn how to collect, analyze and deliver big data to upper management…not poss w/o tech. #TChatTom Bolt
A4: working remotely! Why this isn’t standard is beyond me. We have the tech & capability. Would solve a lot of unemployment #tchatPlatinum Resource
A4: Using HR tech for performance reviews that provide the best perks to employees that contribute most to company’s success #tchatJumpstart HR
A4: I don’t agree with statement that “healthy economy begets dynamic compensation & benefits…” Is that based in fact? #TchatStephen Van Vreede
A4 Through the magic of #hrtech HR gets to tie what they know about employees needs to the business strategy-good ol’ hr analytics. #TChatJanine Truitt
A4: #HRTech can help to retain your top talent through social recognition programs. #TChatSean Charles
A4: Companies can afford more expensive #hrtech solutions, e.g., mobile tech for retail floor worker recognition. #TChatBrent Skinner
A4: This is an interesting one – using big data to determine needs and to analyze utilization of existing benefits perhaps #tchatJoshua Barger
A4. You can’t outsource or techify/digify/socialize (yes I made up words) pure human incentive. Or can you? #TChatSalima Nathoo
A4: #HR should be careful not to hide behind #tech. Easy to disengage from ppl #TchatStephen Van Vreede
A4: social 360 perf review program floats best talent to the top, kills good ol’ boy culture and inspires all #tchatJohn T. Lawrence
A4: It improves the work environment beyond compensation for all. #tchatRob McGahen
A4: HR Tech should include internal social networks for productivity, retention…& eventually new acquisitions. #tchatSam Fiorella
Q5: Are we cruisin’ for a bruisin’? Or is extremism in perks this time different than last time? Why or why not? #TChatSalima Nathoo
A5: Diff because not all companies are enjoying improved business or recovery from recession. #TChatTom Bolt
@SocialSalima A5: extremism is never a good position. #tchatSven Tilburg @ 40FS
A5: BTW, high profile executives with visible unrealistic perks are not good practice in any time. #TChatTom Bolt
A5: Bruisin comin…History teaches 1 thing…that we fail to learn from our mistakes =) #TchatStephen Van Vreede
A5: Comps. are conscious of the budget implications of these perks. If it becomes too much and not maintainable, things can be cut #tchatBright.com
A5: For some companies EP are about looking good NOT being good, they need to reflect the good culture not lack of #tchatJess ‘Babs’ Bahr
A5 Balance is necessary. Re: perks I think consistency is a must but over-rewarding is against the law of human conditioning. #TChatJanine Truitt
A5 imo, not extreme only rare & culture-based. Signing bonus (as @DebAMaher ment’d) costly but different perk & culture #TchatClaire Crossley
A5: Hopefully orgs have learned to do more with less since 2008 and make attractive perks w/out putting them in the red #tchatJoshua Barger
A5: *Extreme Recognition* is the silver bullet. Without it $$$ will only take you so far #TChatSean Charles
A5 Companies are stretching ee’s too thin and haven’t even scratched the surface of offering proper perks. Let’s get back to basics! #TChatJanine Truitt
A5: Perhaps because the rest of the economy is struggling, that thought will linger in perk extremists’ minds. #TChatBrent Skinner
A5: Co that do good always do better. Focus on doing good and you will grow big. Focus on being big and you’ll be so big you’ll fail #tchatBeverly Davis
A5 What is considered an extreme perk? This would change depending on diverse backgrounds and values #TChatTeala Wilson