When to Walk Away From a Job Offer: 7 Red Flags

If you’ve been job-hunting for a while now, you may want to jump at any job offer you can get. However, it’s important to evaluate the offer before making any rash decisions. Consider any red flags that may have come up during the process to determine whether the job is right for you. Here are a few to watch out for:

It’s a big step down. In today’s economy, you might think that taking a job that you’re overqualified for isn’t so bad. But it can make employers think that you’re not resourceful enough to find an appropriate job for your experience and qualifications. You might have to be flexible in your salary requests, but don’t accept a title well beneath your qualifications. Know your worth and determine your bottom line before heading into an interview.

The company offers you the job—immediately. This may be an indication that the organization has experienced a lot of turnover in the position and desperately wants someone to fill the spot. While waiting for the right job offer can be frustrating and costly, it’s often worth the time to be at a company that’s the right fit for you.

The hiring manager seems to be concealing information. If you’ve asked questions about your daily responsibilities or your supervisor and have received the run-around, the hiring manager might not be telling you everything you need to know about the opening. Some employers might do this in fear that you’ll find the position unattractive—so be sure all of your questions are answered before signing a job offer.

You can’t see yourself working in the environment. If you can’t see yourself working in a particular company’s culture, it might not be the best fit for you. You’ll be spending much of your time at the office and you need to feel comfortable in order to put your best foot forward.

Something inside of you says it’s not a good idea. Your gut feeling is often the best indicator of when something is right for you. If you’re feeling uneasy about any step of the process, step back and re-evaluate the offer before putting anything in writing. Do this by asking more questions of the employer, doing some additional research or talking with former and current employees if possible.

There aren’t any available growth opportunities. No room to move up at the organization? You might want to continue looking if the employer says that promotions are atypical. Ask questions about how the hiring manager moved up in the firm and how promotions are typically handed out to determine the company policy.

You don’t think you would get along with your potential colleagues. Conflicting personalities and work styles can make for an unpleasant workplace to say the least. Observe the culture of the company when you head in for an interview and evaluate how well you get along with the hiring manager initially. If you feel that you might be uncomfortable or unhappy in this work environment, it’s probably best to look for a better opportunity.

What else should job seekers watch out for before accepting a job offer?

IMAGE VIA Flickr

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